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YMMV: Scrabble
YMMV Tropes related to the Board Game:
  • Broken Base / "Stop Having Fun" Guys / Scrub: A case where everyone, with few to no exceptions, is either a "Stop Having Fun" Guy or a Scrub. There are essentially two types of Scrabble players; those who play competitively, and those who don't. Learning to play competitively makes it all but socially impossible to play with those who don't, as you won't even be able to agree as to what dictionary to use; a non-competitive player would want to use a general-purpose dictionary, because they view the competitive player bringing in a wordlist they've never heard of, with words obscure enough to not even appear in some "unabridged" dictionaries, to be unfair, while a competitive player would strongly prefer the official tournament wordlist/dictionary and would resent having to "guess" which of the words they learned is in that general-purpose dictionary and which aren't. The "double challenge" rule doesn't help, as one with a significantly better vocabulary (or better knowledge of the dictionary used) can bully the other by making words up and mixing them with real-but-obscure words, daring them to challenge; considered a legitimate tactic in tournament play, but would all but ruin a casual game that already has a significant skill difference. The gap can be somewhat bridged by allowing use of a two-letter-word list, and softening or removing the double challenge rule.
    • Electronic players versus tabletop players. Many traditional players hate the electronic versions, particularly the current app (available cross-platforms on desktop, facebook and various smart phones and tablets). While mostly similar, several changes to traditional play exist:
      • Players have the option of a computer "teacher" to show you a better play you could have made. While most likely that play will be unusable next turn, it can be seen as a "cheat" for the player.
      • The auto tile shuffler. While you can shuffle your tiles by hand in the tabletop game, the ease you can constantly do this is frowned on by traditionalists. To a lesser extent, the built in dictionary, again, totally legal in both, but easier to look up words with this vice a paper dictionary.
      • It's impossible to know if you're opponent is cheating unless they are in the same room. There are many word descramblers and even virtual boards online a person can use to get the best play.
      • The biggest though is the lack of challenges. You can't play a word not in the dictionary (so this aspect of the game is completely absent), which leads into the other half of this issue: there's nothing stopping you from continually trying to play various combinations of your hand until you get something usable.
      • While still generally the same game, being good at the electronic version will probably not get you any respect from a lot of "real" players due to this. Though it should be noted many of the top players in the world do play it and love it for these reasons and like it as a training tool for tabletop play.
  • Game Breaker:
    • Q and Z — each worth 10 points — can become this if either is placed on a bonus tile.
      • Merely placing one of these on a Triple Letter tile guarantees more than 30 points from that tile alone.
      • Triple Word score spaces placed not far from Double Letter spaces along the perimeter of the board. If properly played, these two letters alone can be worth 90 points — or possibly 270 points under even more unlikely circumstances.
    • To a lesser extent, the J and X tiles, which are both worth 8 points.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: The game is very popular in Senegal.
  • The Scrappy:
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: The rule change permitting proper names ruffled a few feathers in the United Kingdom, except it was widely misreported by the media and only appears in a newly launched variant of the game. The rules of the original game haven't been changed, so words beginning with capital letters are still invalid.

YMMV Tropes related to the Game Show:
  • Accidental Innuendo: A female contestant selected two "P" tiles and said, "Chuck, I guess I'll have to take a 'P'." Cue uproarious laughter from Woolery and the audience, and a quick trip to Dick Clark's Bloopers specials.
  • Awesome Moment: Any time a contestant gets the word from just the clue, without adding any extra letters...ESPECIALLY in the Sprint rounds.
  • Growing the Beard: When the show switched from straddling to self-contained on September 29, 1986, at the start of The $100,000 All-American Scrabble Tournament, followed by the addition of the Bonus Sprint round on December 29 of that year.
  • Replacement Scrappy: Steve Edwards, who hosted the 1990 pilot.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: Many fans' opinion of the 1993 revival, which had a smaller set and much lower budget, among other things. A rather bad change was that the money from bonus squares went into a Bonus Sprint Progressive Jackpot (which began at $1,000) instead of directly to the contestants, reducing their desire to hit them immediately...much to Woolery's dismay.
  • What an Idiot:
    • Sang, the record holder for most time spent in the Sprint round, about 87 seconds, in part due to overeager buzzing in and blowing one word with only one letter missing. His opponent bombed on at least two of the same words.
    • One year earlier, John set the record for most time spent in the Sprint round, 62.9 seconds...AND HE WON!!, thanks to his opponent, Lysa, blowing it.note  You have to see it to believe it.


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