YMMV / Pokémon Ranger

  • Angst? What Angst?: The Pichu from Dolce Island in the aftergame are still as cheerful as ever despite their home island being vaporized.
    Man: They sure don't look like they lost their home island.
  • Anticlimax Boss: Giant Crobat, while definitely a cool idea, is executed in a way where it is simply not difficult especially compared to its fellow Societea bosses Ditto and Regigigas. It is a sky battle, meaning that there is no rage mode, and while the player can't use any Poke Assists, it can't break the line except through attacks. This also means that its large size actually works against it, being a bigger target to only partially circle. It also has very low health and very easy to avoid attacks (Just don't get hit by those attacks).
  • Breather Boss: Spiritomb in Shadows of Almia, after Kincaid's Drapion, mainly because of two things: between those two you can get Steel-type Partner Pokémon and you also unlock Power Charge.
  • Complete Monster: Purple Eyes from Guardian Signs is the nefarious leader of the Pokémon Pinchers and a true sociopath who eclipses even the Societea in cruel ambition. Kidnapping and brutalizing Rand before the plot and pulling the strings behind Red Eyes and Blue Eyes, Purple Eyes debuts in the midst of holding Rand's family hostage and torturing his young daughter Nema. After he's sold as a lost cause by Dr. Edward, Purple Eyes raids the parts of the Golden Armor from the other Societea members, usurping Dr. Edward's position and controlling Mewtwo into finishing him off—gleefully brushing off Rand's apparent sacrifice once he takes the bullet. Once he's defeated, Purple Eyes allows himself to die with the full knowledge that without the Golden Armor's power, the fortress he and the Rangers are on will plummet into the ocean and create a tsunami powerful enough to wipe out Oblivia and everyone in it. Purple Eyes truly comes into his own in the story's last extra mission; after repeated interrogation, Purple Eyes snaps and decides the only logical course of action is to exterminate all humanity and recreate it as its supreme god, attempting to goad Arceus into killing off all humans whilst leaving himself as their sole survivor. One of the franchise's earliest examples of an Omnicidal Maniac and bereft of any redeeming qualities on top of that, Purple Eyes is the nastiest villain to ever grace the Pokémon Ranger franchise.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: The Go-Rock Quads in the first game. They even reappear in both subsequent games as guest stars, though they're Demoted to Extra in the third.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Both gendered protagonists together in all three games. Though in Shadows of Almia, Protagonist/Keith is also significantly popular.
  • Foe Yay: The manga adaptation has this... interesting scene between Solana and Tiffany.
  • Fridge Logic: How exactly is Team Dim Sun supposed to use a Wailord as a cargo ship? Gut it and use its innards as a storage device?
    • Porygon-Z can be found in the past in the third game. Porygon-Z!
    • Mewtwo is in an ancient temple. Probably placed there by Edward, but that brings up the question of how he set up that machine in such a short time...
  • Game Breaker - In the second game, the steel-type assist prevents targeted Pokémon from attacking. Halfway through the game, you obtain a steel-type partner Pokémon. Do the math.
    • The Psychic-type assist is also very powerful, being able to immobilize just about anything for extended periods of time. Grab Mime Jr. as your partner, and laugh all the way to the end of the game.
    • Early in the third game, you can catch a Xatu. Its assist is extremely powerful, and briefly prevents the opponent from attacking. Just put it in a corner or behind an attacking Pokémon, and you've won.
  • Goddamned Bats - Golbats and Crobats in the caves will not leave you alone. Generally, any aggressive Pokémon that is faster than you, such as Houndoom, would qualify.
    • Some fights for the final mission might count, like three Gabite. They're not much as difficult as annoying, since half of the time they will run over your line (and as such, the otherwise gamebreaking Shieldon won't make it a piece of cake). Your best bet is probably to use Steel-type assist and spam the hell out of it with small balls, and then quickly encircle it before the bar drops down.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: So, we had this Giant Crobat boss. Few years later, Generation VI and Mega Evolutions come.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: Show of hands - who played the first game without the intention of getting that Manaphy egg for the Gen IV games (assuming you didn't get the game second-hand and got screwed over by the previous owner already swiping that cart's egg)?
  • Memetic Mutation: TARGET CLEAR!!
  • Moral Event Horizon: The Societea cross this when they VAPORIZE Dolce Island! And where to begin with Purple Eyes...
    • Probably when he beats Rand and has Nema and Leanne kidnapped. And that is before we even see him for the first time.
    • Kincaid crosses it in Shadows when he leaves you, many Pokémon and several subordinates on a ship that will sink in four minutes.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: The fact that the Ranger Net bonus missions can only be played once per cartridge, not once per playthrough, but only once per actual physical copy of the game. While this is obviously done to keep the Pokémon limited, it also completely destroys the game's resale value, since who wants to play a used copy with all the endgame prizes taken from it? This has also made Manaphy one of the most elusive Legendary Pokémon to obtain in any of the games, as a result.
  • Surprisingly Improved Sequel: Most people think that both the story and gameplay were improved in the second and third games; Shadows of Almia replaced the capture system with a friend meter (at the cost of some of the game's difficulty; hence the "most"), and Guardian Signs allowed the reuse of friend Pokémon over and over again under certain conditions as well as making Quests less tedious by allowing you to pick up Quests as you find them rather than taking them one at a time.
  • That One Boss: Drapion. Not only Drapion hits quite hard, but low on HP he turns red, spamming with gas cloud giving not much time where you can freely circle him. Additionally, the fight's preceeded by two Rhyhorn and three Stunky, and you have to do all three in a row. And this is before you get the handy Shieldon. Even these Drowzeenote  on the ship may not be enough of help and you may need to repeat fight.
    • Rampardos is also this for some. It's a massive step-up from the previous bosses and has three very strong attacks that can quickly drain your styler.
    • Salamence from the original game. His attacks hurt, he has one of the highest loop count in the entire game, and making any loops is hard (since there's only that much time he's in the air and landing counts as an attack; on top of that, circling him on the ground is harder, since he has a habit of beaming you when you try to loop). Oh, and he doesn't give a damn about your partner's assist, even though he isn't immune to Electric-type.
    • Also from the original game is Steelix. The good news: it doesn't actually attack. The bad news: it doesn't have to. Stellix is the only Pokémon in the game that deals contact damage, and quite a chunk of it at that. It's also the biggest Pokémon in the game bar none, and your maximum loop size at that point is just barely able to contain the whole thing. To top it off, Steelix never holds still and has a fairly high loop count.
  • That One Sidequest: If you consider the Past missions in Guardian Signs to be one big sidequest adventure, then it's this because of how insane several of them are, especially when playing alone.
    • For those Shiny Hunters aiming for the Manaphy Egg in the first game, this can be the biggest challenge. Essentially, you have to complete the Manaphy mission (which itself is not this trope), then transfer the egg to Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, then trade to another game, and hope it's shiny. If it isn't, well, you have to play through the whole damn game again on another cartridge.
  • Underused Game Mechanic: Downplayed in Shadows of Almia. While the "Swimming on a Pokemon" mechanic is indeed used many times in the game, they mostly advertised the part where you do it on an Empoleon's back... something that happens only once in the whole game (Three times if you're going for 100% Completion, two if you already knew about a certain subquest before and take a short deviation when you go there for the first time), while for most of the time you surf on a Floatzel's back.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/PokemonRanger