WMG / Goosebumps

     The Books 

In 50 years, the Goosebumps series will be studied in school literature courses.
Whole doctoral theses will be written on how these stories are masterpieces of the horror genre ranking with Edgar Allan Poe's work and The Martian Chronicles.
  • We can hope, can't we?

The events from "The Cuckoo Clock of Doom" are responsible for the Goosebumps 2000 series already ending in January 2000.
And for Goosebumps Gold to have been planned for a whole year later. After all, when 1988 never existed, you don't find that many twelve year old protagonists in 2000.

Goosebumps Horrorland is Goosebumps Ultimate Universe.
More or less the same things that happend in the main Goosebumps univers happend there, too, but they happend much later and some (like, The Haunted Mask II) didn't happen at all. Some of the reprints share this universe, like the version of The Cuckoo Clock of Doom where the year that gets erased is 1998 instead of 1988.

I Live In Your Basement is the REAL end to the Series.
The REAL Twist is that the Entire Series is All Just a Dream by Keith. Anything written after that is just more dream scenes.

All Goosebumps titles exist in a multiverse like The Dark Tower.
The mascot Curly the Skeleton can travel between worlds a la Rod Sterling. He was the voice saying "Goosebumps, viewer beware you're in for a scare" in the opening theme of the TV show.

The Series is meant to be a Parody of the Horror Genre
It makes sense. Doesn't it?
  • Except of course when the stories actually are scary, right? Fridge Horror is quite common. The earlier stories are more of the type with an emphasis on direct horror. And there are the CYOA "Give Yourself Goosebumps" that in the same book may be a parody with one ending, a subversion with another, a double-subverted discussed parody that then subverts its parody nature by becoming a Dangerously Genre Savvy ending...and even just a couple endings that are played perfectly straight. Not to mention the use of ghostwriters, meaning canonical dissonance.
  • Who ever said horror parody can't be scary? Let's remember Scream is both horror parody and scary horror film.

The girl on the front of The Curse of Camp Cold Lake is meant to be Sarah, not Della
She fits the description of Sarah a lot better along with being perfectly opaque, unlike see-through Della. And the surface looks like clammy cold white skin more than bone. Perhaps Sarah was killed by the snake, her body dumped in the lake to hide the evidence, but whatever magic was in the lake kept her from decomposing too much and somehow her soul stayed with her body/corpse and we got what we see on the cover today. As a result, she'll either be Nightmare Fuel or Fetish Fuel or perhaps just Ugly Cute in her own way.

The world where "Attack of the Mutant" takes place is Earth-Prime.
The creator of the Masked Mutant is psychically tuned to the Mutant's universe, what he thought was his imagination was actually events that really happened. The Masked Mutant created an interdimensional portal which sent him to Skipper's world.

The body-switch agency in "Why I'm Afraid of Bees" does actually illegal experiments with humans.
The reason there is no money involved is that they just want to test the switching method to make money later on. Of course this is forbidden, so they aim on kids who are naive enough not to ask and of course don't ask for their parent's permission.

"Be Afraid - Be Very Afraid" is a never-ending loop because the book and card game are a trap.
The wizard character created a reality warping card game and book which sucks unsuspecting individuals inside when they start to play the card game, and when it reaches a certain point, he gives the card and book set to someone else to keep the story going. The book gets longer or shorter depending on how many people are inside and whether or not they survive. For no other reason than For the Evulz.

Wally is actually Mr. Wood.

In Slappy's Nightmare, another dummy, Wally, is introduced as his twin for Jimmy O'James to use for his show while Slappy tries to learn An Aesop about doing something nice for a change. Same cold blue eyes, same expression, looks exactly like him, except his hair color is never mentioned. In the first book, aside from their different outfits and the trademark chip on Slappy's lip, the only thing that could differentiate them otherwise is their hair color. Slappy is a brunette; Mr. Wood is a redhead. Therefore, it is possible that it's the same dummy, different name (and his brief appearance can be due to either the Goosebumps 2000 books being a separate series, or the All Just a Dream ending).

And a little on that note...

Slappy is a redhead in the show because the puppet was really intended to be Mr. Wood.

As noted above, Mr. Wood is a redhead, and Slappy is a brunette. Note that there has never been an episode made for Night of the Living Dummy; it just starts with the second book. I have yet to find confirmation, but it's possible that there was meant to be an episode for the first book, but it was cancelled for some reason (possibly because Mr. Wood is notably the more violent twin), and the puppet built to be Mr. Wood was just recycled as Slappy. The creators of the show were just too lazy to give it a quick paint job to be more accurate to the book.

The world in Welcome To Camp Nightmare is the real setting of the entire series.
The Goosebumps series takes place in a horrifying Alternate Universe where various supernatural beings and mutants struggle for control of Earth. Camp Nightmare takes place in the future, where humanity has finally become aware of these dangers, and hyperspace travel to alternate earths is accessible. Camps such as Nightmoon are organized so children can prepare to look for a better world.
  • Also, the various Crazy scientists seen throughout the series (Brewer, Deep, Hawlings, The Shopkeeper) are secretly researching weapons for the government to combat these supernatural menaces. After all, a bunch of deflatable green ogres wouldn't last 10 minutes against genetically engineered, carnivorous super plants.

King Jellyjam was formed from Kraang Mutagen
In this case, the substance merged the snails and Jelly, as well as endowed it with budding Psychic Powers, similar to Dr.Rockwell and the Rat King. His existence was never revealed to the public since undercover Kraang agents carried away his body.
  • Or alternately, the campers he eats turn into the snails excreted from his skin.

The Masked Mutant was created by the typewriter in The Blob That Ate Everyone.
Or alternately, since the power was in Zackie's mind, not the typewriter, he was born from the imagination of another lightning-strike victim.

The Masked Mutant planned for Skipper to defeat him.
Think about it. He knows full well he's a comic character created to appease a certain youth demographic, and he's not happy because he has no real control over his life. When the Mutant confronts the boy and reveals he'll have to kill him, he shows signs of remorse, even apologizing. The reason he targeted Skipper in the first place was because he knew the villain's weakness-why wouldn't he know that himself? His plan was to scan the kid into the comic world, fake his death, and then run free in real life while Skipper became his successor.

Both of the origin stories for Monster Blood are true.
After all, there's no rule saying a witch can't cast a spell on a dangerous military experiment. The military made it grow and make anything that consumes it grow; Sarabeth just made it obey her.

Slappy is Caesar.
His partnership with Susan apparently worked out so well that he grew to prefer working with young girls.

After the events of Attack of the Mutant, Skipper becomes a Toon.
He turns into ink. Self explanatory. 'Nuff said. Of course, he's probably a different breed from the Toons in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, considering that the comic book characters in this story can be hurt by things other than Dip.

The Shopkeeper from Haunted Mask and Dr. Brewer are alchemists,with the Unloved/mutant plants being Homunculi/Chimeras
How else would they be able to create life so easily? Also,the Shopkeeper's disfigured face and the real Dr. Brewer's transformation into a flower? Truth's idea of a joke.

     The Movie 

The Masked Mutant will make a surprise appearance in The Movie.
He'll turn out to be disguised as one of the Protagonists.
  • Jossed, The Masked Mutant does not appear as any one of the protagonists but Hannah is from "The Ghost Next Door"

Ryan Lee will play Zach and Hannah's platonic best friend
And he'll disappear halfway through the movie.

Hannah is from the books too.
Either she's an original, non-Goosebumps creation that Stine made, or she's based on one of the monsters - possibly the dog-children from My Hairiest Adventure.
  • Considering she's Zach's next door neighbor, she could be Hannah, the main character from book #10, The Ghost Next Door.
    • Confirmed, she is the girl from "The Ghost Next Door"

Somebody will try to wish the Abominable Snowman back into the book
But they'll get Clarissa from Be Careful What You Wish For to do it and it'll screw up, causing the other monsters to be unleashed.
  • Jossed: Slappy is the one who unleashes all the monsters. R.L. Stine is the one who gets the Abominable Snowman in the book initially, but Slappy releases it again

Some of the monsters will be on the heroes' side.
Quite a few from the series are relatively non-malicious,and some books have supernatural entities as the protagonists(Ghost next Door,My Hairiest Adventure,How I Learned To Fly).
  • Jossed: All of the monsters appear to be after the main characters and the townspeople.
  • Actually, confirmed. Hannah is technically one of Stine's monsters.

The Jack Black portrayed Stine is an impostor.
Besides the whole "magic manuscripts" business and his fictional daughter,the real R.L Stine has been confirmed for a cameo. To elaborate, it could be he's really the Masked Mutant, who can somehow cross into reality. He may have escaped from his book, usurped Stine's identity, taken on Hannah from Ghost Next Door as a "daughter" and eventually tricked Zach into unlocking the books so he could gather a monster army.

Some Hidden Villain manipulated Zach into finding the manuscripts.
  • Jossed, he finds them when concerned for Hannah.

A similar thing happened with Rod Serling, with the recordings of his scripts containing the monstrosities (physical and moral) of his works.
  • See the Twilight Zone episode "A World of his Own"

R. L. Stine isn't human.

Came to mind after reading the segment above about The Blob That Ate Everything and the typewriter above, but the reason R. L. Stine can use the typewriter to create literal monsters is he isn't human. He's a humanoid being with supernatural powers that allow him to create his monsters, and the typewriter is disguised alien technology.

The Sequel will have a child with similar powers to Stine's
They'll be bullied and alone, like Stine was, but they'll find solace in the Goosebumps books. They'll be able to bring the monsters out of the books, no manuscript or typewriter required, and control them to send them against their enemies.

Hannah wasn't the only character Stine allowed to stay in the real world
Considering how quite a few of the monsters(and non-human protagonists) were portrayed in a sympathetic light, and how many are missing from Slappy's mob, they may be living in secret across the country with Stine keeping watch on them. Some of them might be laying low out of fear(The Beasts,Plant-Brewer), respect(The Masked Mutant,Clarissa,) or because they look up to him like a father, similar to Slappy and Hannah (Erin and Marty, The Sadler ghosts, Della, Keith).
  • Confirmed in a way. Stine accidentally left the Invisible Boy out of the new story. He and Hannah are the only confirmed monsters to still be in the real world.

The Masked Mutant will be the Big Bad of the sequel.

Curly the Skeleton will appear in the sequel.

Horrorland will be the setting for the sequel.

The Hannah from the end of the movie is actually the Masked Mutant.


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