Videogame / Five Nights at Freddy's 3

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You will never be ready for Fr—wait, you're not Freddy...

"As always, remember to smile; you are the face of Freddy Fazbear's Pizza."

Congratulations! Welcome to your new job as the security guard of "Fazbear's Fright", the newest and spookiest horror attraction in town! This haunted restaurant is based on the tales of that infamous "Freddy Fazbear's Pizza" place from nearly thirty years ago; it even features real artifacts recovered from the various pizzerias, which will help make this place a frightfully good time for the whole family.

The attraction opens in a week, so your job is to give things a test-run and make sure all that ancient wiring doesn't cause the building to burn down or something. Electricity concerns are so thirty years ago, and your handy-dandy terminal can reboot any system that happens to malfunction. You might want to make sure the ventilation system keeps chugging, since people have been known to hallucinate some crazy things when deprived of fresh air. We've also given you control of the audio system so you can create extra ambiance. Oh, and you can't spell "security guard" without "security", so you can seal off the vents to prevent any Air Vent Escapes.

Oh. And keep this close to your chest, but we might actually be able to get one of the original animatronicsnote  and have it installed before the place opens. How cool would that be? ...Wait, where are you going?

Five Nights at Freddy's 3, a horror-themed strategy game, is the third entry in the Five Nights at Freddy's franchise and a direct sequel to Five Nights at Freddy's 2; it was released by creator Scott Cawthon on the 2nd of March 2015. You can currently buy the game from Steam and the App Store.

Much like the second game, teaser images for FNAF 3 began showing up on creator Scott Cawthon's website in the weeks before its reveal; these were followed by a brief-yet-frightening trailer. The day after the game's release, Scott put up an image of Freddy Fazbear's hat sitting alone in a spotlight, which implied FNAF 3 was the Grand Finale of the series...

...until the 22nd of April, when the hat disappeared from the image. Five days later (of course), Scott officially announced this game's direct sequel, Five Nights at Freddy's 4 (then reported to be the last game in the series, until it wasn't).


Five Nights at Freddy's 3 contains examples of the following tropes:

  • 100% Completion: Playing the game's five nights normally will actually get you the "bad" ending. You have to replay the game and complete everything within the secret hidden minigames to get the "good" ending.
  • Air-Vent Passageway: Is used by Springtrap as another way to get around the building rather than walking between the rooms, though you can seal them to thwart this (but only one vent can be sealed at a time). They're actually justified and justifies the hallucination: they're so wide (and have cameras in them) because Fazbear Fright wanted to replicate the old places, i.e. the pizzeria in 2. And judging by the absence of fans or a way to get outside air in, they're terribly inept.
  • Alone with the Psycho: This time around, it's you and a literal Killer Rabbit. Par for the course, really, but at least now the animatronic is almost alone, too. Played much more literally this time around, as instead of a bunch of vengeful children's souls, the spirit possessing Springtrap is an actual Serial Killer.
  • And I Must Scream: This mini game suggests that this is the fate of Shadow Bonnie, as the minigame is triggered by clicking on a darkened Toy Bonnie figure in your office.
    • As we learn later, the Murderer is now in Springtrap and has spent the last few decades locked in a room in an abandoned Pizzeria, which more than qualifies for this trope.
    • Let's not forget the dead children, whose souls have been trapped in some grim purgatory depicted in the hidden minigames for who knows how long.
  • And Now for Someone Completely Different:
    • Ironically, a game in a series titled Five Nights at Freddy's doesn't actually star Freddy; rather, it stars a not very new animatronic called Springtrap.
    • For the first two nights, there's a "Phone Dude" that talks to you in the voicemails. He's much more laid-back than Phone Guy, even though he ends up passing the mic to give you some pre-recorded voicemails from the original Phone Guy.
    • For some of the hidden minigames, you get to play as some of the older animatronics such as BB, Mangle, Toy Chica, and even the Puppet.
  • Animated Armor: Springtrap is more of an animatronic suit than a suit of armor, but it is possessed by the Purple Man and even has his rotting corpse in it.
  • Arc Words: "As always, remember to smile. You are the face of Freddy's Fazbear's Pizza."
  • Artifact Title: Aside from the name of the place and a random encounter with him, Freddy Fazbear himself doesn't actually show up. That doesn't stop him from jumping you anyway, along with the other Phantoms.
  • Artificial Stupidity: It looked like we were gonna have another go at this trope at first, since the first look at the map only showed what amounted to a linear hallway with only one avenue of attack. Then the brightened map came out and we saw the hidden vent leading to the office, showing that Springtrap can attack both from the door and the vent. And, considering his inhabitant, it's no surprise that this guy's a bit brighter.
  • Artificial Zombie: Springtrap is literally the reanimated corpse of the Murderer, likely both possessed and driven by the suit's parts connected to his nervous system. This is a major contrast to the other animatronics, which, despite the hints that they're stuffed with corpses, have their usual endoskeletons with no hint of human material inside.
  • Asshole Victim: The Purple Man, whose death is not only contributed to by the ghosts of the children that he murdered, but also directly caused by Springtrap killing him iron maiden-style.
  • Big Bad: Springtrap, the Fazbear brand's last surviving animatronic, and by far the most dangerous. Bonus points for the fact that the Purple Man — body and soul — is inside that suit, thus making him the Big Bad of the whole franchise.
  • Bittersweet Ending: You might need to think about it; the good ending shows that the spirits of the children who were murdered in the Freddy Fazbear businesses have finally moved on to the afterlife, having gotten revenge on the man who took their lives away. Initial reaction is "yay!", right? But think about it; this crusade has caused nothing but misery for so, so long. The animatronics that used to entertain and make children happy — even these children, themselves, once upon a time — are now feared and possibly even loathed. One person is even known to have had his frontal lobe torn off of his brain and at least one Night Guard is dead. Sure, they have been able to come to terms with what happened to them, and move on, but at what cost?
  • Bloodier and Gorier: The first two games were mostly devoid of explicit violence, but not only are there organs visible inside Springtrap, and blood directly shown in the endings, but three hidden images let you see just exactly what's inside Springtrap...
  • Bloodless Carnage: Averted with the Purple Man's fate. Despite it being depicted in the Atari-style retraux cutscenes, when he meets his fate inside Springtrap we explicitly see blood spurt from the animatronic.
  • Body Horror: Springtrap has the eviscerated and crushed body of the Purple Man inside it, and there are select pictures that sometimes appear on startup (although it's rare) as well as a secret in-game screen that show you glimpses of the Purple Man's body inside the animatronic.
  • Breather Episode: Night 1 can serve as this to veterans of the Freddy games. You are in absolutely no danger and the night passes quickly because of Phone Dude's four-hour call and the fact that nothing can harm you. Springtrap and the hallucinations don't begin plaguing you until Night 2.
  • Broke Your Arm Punching Out Cthulhu: The Purple Guy managed to destroy the animatronics...but that only set the spirits possessing them free and allowed them to finally take their revenge on him.
  • The Bus Came Back: As mentioned above, the new owners salvaged what was left of the toy animatronics from 2, leaving the possibility that they will return very real. And they do, in most of the secret minigames and hallucinations.
  • Call Back: Once again, a decayed rabbit-like animatronic is slumped against the wall in the trailer.
    • When you trigger the Puppet hallucination, it just stares at you...just like it did to Freddy.
  • Chekhov's Gun: 395248. It appears during Chica's mini-game sequence, and using it on the wall panels in the office (between the box and the desk, it's ordered like a phone) will take you to the Golden Freddy minigame.note 
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: The first game had more dark, grey and blue colors associated with it, the second used a lot more reds in their images, this game's color? YELLOW AND GREEN.
  • Continuity Nod: A box lies in the corner of the new office; it's filled with the toy animatronics' heads, Mangle's hand, Foxy's hook, Toy Bonnie's guitar, and a paper plate doll. It's mostly unimportant, though that doll moves.
    • A secret screen shows Springtrap pulling his head off, in a similar fashion to the secret poster showing Freddy pulling his head off in the first game. Unlike Freddy, however, you can see exactly what's inside Springtrap's head. It isn't pretty.
    • Similar to the first game's poster that spawns Golden Freddy, posters of Freddy can be seen to change into posters of Springtrap.
  • Creepy Changing Painting: Posters of Freddy can rarely change into posters of Springtrap, in the same art style.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: Wearing the hybrid suits incorrectly, as described by recordings of Phone Guy, will result in your body being crushed and impaled at once. We see this happen to the Purple Man in the game's ending, and it's not pleasant.
  • Darker and Edgier: Oh, hell yes. Not only does Springtrap look far worse than any of the previous animatronics (that's not even getting into the fact that Springtrap has a rotting human corpse inside the suit), but Fazbear's Fright in general appears abandoned and bleak. Justified — somewhat — in the sense that the new owners of the place are turning it into a horror attraction.
  • Death Glare: The trailer has Springtrap doing an extremely unnerving one to the viewer while twitching violently and slumped against a wall.
  • Demoted to Extra: The old cast have become props for the horror attraction. Even, it seems, Freddy and the Puppet.
    • Not that they're, ah, gone or anything. Phantom versions of them can show up at any given moment and jump you at will. And even then, they're directly responsible for the game's events, as they took their revenge on the Murderer and left him trapped in Springtrap.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: For the children, at least. After decades of suffering, the spirits of the dead children are finally put at rest. The Murderer is slain in a most brutal fashion (and his reanimated corpse is seemingly set on fire and burnt to ashes), the guard of the third game survives all six nights, and the ghosts of the children are finally set free, symbolized by the bright eyes of the animatronics finally dimming.
    • Played literally straight too. The game makes you work for the Good Ending by finding the mini-games, finding all the missing children within them, getting the last mini-game and serving the cake to the last child , and then beating the game.
  • Easter Egg: The hidden minigames that must be completed to get the Good Ending.
    • You can still honk Freddy's nose on the drawing in the office.
    • Someone pointed out that if you take the map screen and turn it upside down, it resembles Scott Cawthon's avatar from his game There Is No Pause Button!. Check it.
    • If you read the blurred out text surrounding the newspaper in the neutral ending after beating Nightmare mode; it's trivia about the making of the first game.
  • Failure Is the Only Option: The interactive cutscenes after each night, which are all the same but with a differing animatronic. You must follow Shadow Freddy throughout the rooms, and eventually you'll try to exit a room upwards only for "ERROR" or "ERR" to appear. The Purple Man will then come and destroy the animatronic.
    • Sometimes, you won't even be at that point, but the Purple Man will still jump you.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • An announcement on Steam Greenlight contained the message "My name is Springtrap." Sure enough, when you finally unlock the Extra Screen, the game officially names the new animatronic as Springtrap.
    • In many ways the truth about Springtrap has been foreshadowed since the first game. A suit that is apparently wearable, hidden even to the employees and in this game, the recordings state that the suit can injure and maim if put on. In the ending, The Purple Man puts on the suit in a panic and it kills him.
    • Sometimes when on the main menu, a couple of pictures can appear, showing a horribly mutilated corpse inside Springtrap. And as the night 5 ending shows, it's the murderer's corpse.
    • In the first night, Phone Dude says that much of the wiring comes from the original installment and is decades old. Over the week, the electronics get more and more twitchy and unreliable. In the second ending, Fazbear's Fright goes up in flames.
      • To add to this, the Phantom Animatronics look like they've been burned, possibly foreshadowing Fazbear Fright's inevitable demise.
    • The second night, Phone Dude decides to play some cassettes he found. Said cassettes are of Phone Guy from the first game explaining how to wear and operate the animatronic suits. Hinting at the true nature of Springtrap and what's inside it.
    • If you look closely at Springtrap's jumpscare when he gets you at the right side of the office, you can briefly see what appears to be part of the killer's jaw inside his mouth.
    • Springtrap's physical appearance has some foreshadowing: he's golden and due to decay, his face seems to have a constant smile on it. The Murderer wore a yellow suit during his murders and was always depicted with a big grin on his face.
    • Unlike the previous animatronics, Springtrap's always making sure to hide as much of himself as possible, only going for it when it's too late. Turns out he's had a lot more experience with this whole "murdering" thing before.
    • "Yeah, I wasn't joking about the fire, that-that...that's a real risk."
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: Mangle continues in this role among the animatronics. A Phantom Mangle hallucination can be triggered, but the Phantom is not in the Animatronics section of the Extras menu, nor does it actually visually jump scare the player. (Audibly, though...)
  • Grand Finale: Though the fourth one was billed as "The Final Chapter", this game fits the spirit of it more. We're told what happened to the murderer: He's Springtrap, the final animatronic. He is (hopefully) destroyed in a fire that burns down Fazbear Fright which, aside from a few things that will be sold at a public auction, took down most of the pizzeria's history with it. The children's ghosts are also finally at peace, and are able to move on to the afterlife. All in all, it seems that Freddy Fazbear's Pizzeria has been permanently put down. So, technically, it is the Grand Finale, though only chronologically.
  • Golden Ending: The Good Ending, which takes quite some work to achieve. You have to uncover various Easter eggs to access hidden minigames that you must complete by occasionally breaking the game's rules and leaving its boundaries.
  • Guide Dang It: You can avoid almost every single jump-scare/hallucination if you know what triggers them and what you can do to counteract it. Phantom BB, for example, always pre-empts his jump-scares by changing the image on your camera to a close-up of himself. If you switch to a different camera feed before lowering the camera screen, you avoid the hallucination.
    • The game gives you clues on how to access the hidden minigames, but the actual steps involve playing with the environment in ways you should not be able to. And on top of that, each minigame has a hidden "win" condition that is required for the Golden Ending.
  • Hallucinations: One of the dangers in this game is, if the ventilation system goes out, you'll start hallucinating and seeing things like a Balloon Boy jump scare. The Puppet also makes an appearance, though it does not jump you. It simply stares, effectively blocking your view of everything for a long time.
  • Harder Than Hard: Nightmare Mode, which is this game's version of Night 6. Completing it unlocks you the extras, which includes the animatronics' Jump Scare animations and a cheat code menu among other elements.
    • One of those cheats is 'aggressive' which, combined with Nightmare Mode, makes a challenge equivalent to the 4/20 and 10/20 modes of the preceding games.
    • The Good Ending is much harder to get than the Bad Ending, which you get merely by playing the game's nights normally. To get the Good Ending, you have to find hidden Easter eggs by essentially breaking and bending the game's laws. It's nigh impossible to do without a walkthrough to guide you.
  • Heel–Face Turn: The spirits of the dead children had been controlling the animatronics in previous installments, and it was entirely clear that they were malevolent forces. Tragic Monsters, yes, but still the villains of every piece before. This time, Springtrap is being controlled by their murderer, a sidequest involves freeing their souls, and the only way the old animatronics antagonize you at all is in the form of Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane hallucinations.
  • Hell Is That Noise:
    • The first game's jumpscare noises were derived from a child's scream (SKREEEEE-). The second game had the animatronics emit a mechanical roar instead (REEEAAAAH-). This game? A horrific zombie-like screech that sounds NOTHING like what a robot should sound like. (RHUIIIIAAAAH-) This turns out to be appropriate, as the Murderer's corpse is inside it.
    • Phantom Mangle's static, which can and will act as a Jump Scare.
    • The disorienting industrial noises heard at the beginning of each night (at the "12:00 AM - NIGHT X" title card).
    • The grating buzz that plays throughout The Puppet's hallucination.
    • The awful sound, reminiscent of a dial-up modem, that assaults your ears every time the Purple Man destroys an animatronic in the end-of-night minigames.
    • The low whining noise that plays when one of the animatronics are in or near your office. Unlike the previous game, though, it doesn't sound like metallic whining, gets louder depending on how close the animatronics are, and is generally more subtle.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: By destroying the animatronics, the Purple Man frees the children's spirits, leading to his own death in the same fashion as his own victims.
  • Instant-Win Condition: It doesn't matter if Springtrap's in your office and lumbering toward you- you make it to 6 AM and you've won the night.
  • Interface Screw: The Phantom Puppet's jumpscare features him directly in front of you, staring at you for several seconds, much like one of the after-level cutscenes in Five Nights at Freddy's 2. While he is doing this, you cannot bring up the cameras or the systems reboot panel.
    • Getting jumped by most of the Phantoms will bring down your ventilation (regardless of whether or not it was fine before the scare). Mangle leaves the ventilation alone, and instead plays loud, garbled radio static (preventing you from hearing Springtrap if he climbs into the vents) while causing an audio system error. The Puppet will cause a ventilation error, in addition to blocking access to the monitors.
    • When the ventilation systems are out, you will occasionally black out for a few moments at a time. These blackouts can be used by Springtrap to get closer or strike if he's around the office.
  • Jump Scare: Even more than in the previous games. The Player Character can experience hallucinations of the now-retired animatronics randomly jumping at him. It's mostly harmless. Mostly.
    • After completing Nightmare Mode, you unlock the extras, where you get to see each animatronic's jumpscare animation (among other things).
  • Just Ignore It: The last thing you want to do when you see Freddy outside your window is stop whatever it is you were doing and stare at him. This is also how you deal with the rest of the Phantom animatronics through the camera, although you have to be more proactive in avoiding them.
  • Killed Off for Real:
    • Some fans believed the announcement of a third game meant Fazbear Entertainment had survived its closure following the first game. This game clarifies that it did, in fact, go completely out of business.
    • All of the animatronics from the previous games are now simply props for Fazbear's Fright. The original four animatronics from 1 are now light props and the like, while the remains of the Toy animatronics are just bits and pieces in a box in your office. It's revealed this is because the Murderer managed to destroy them...only to then be killed himself by their vengeful spirits, allowing them to finally rest in peace.
    • The reveal at the ending of the game, which shows that the Purple Man has been Dead All Along and haunting Springtrap.
    • A happier version of this occurs if you rescue all of the children in the minigames, then go to the "Happiest Day" minigame. You get to see all of the dead children with their animatronic masks on, then the children disappear, leaving only the masks, and the balloons above them float upwards and off the screen, implying that the spirits of the murdered children have finally gotten to pass on. You can watch it here.
  • Let the Past Burn: At the end of the game, the whole horror attraction goes up in flames, burning down the building and most of the objects in it, hopefully ending the Fazbear curse once and for all.
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane: The hallucinations of the older animatronics. Are they due to the spirits within them, extensions of the killer's ghost trying to hinder you, or just due to a mixture of fear and a lack of oxygen in the night guard's office?
    • Most of them could be attributed to the air, since the ventilation will always be down after a jumpscare. Mangle, however, crashes your audio without touching the ventilation systems.
    • This game in general though leans much closer to magic than the other two games when it confirms that Purple Guy's victims did indeed turn into ghosts, and the legacy of Freddy Fazbear is most certainly haunted.
  • Missing Trailer Scene: Played with. The twitching Springtrap scene does happen in the ending, but it's in the old school graphics mode. And thank god for that.
  • Multiple Endings: Unlike the last two games, there are multiple endings here. Beating the game normally reveals the fate of the Purple Man who is lured into a hybrid suit and crushed to death by the faulty mechanics. However, this gets you the Bad Ending where you're given a shot of the animatronic heads with the lights still glowing in their eyes, because, even though they've gotten their revenge, the spirits of the children are still haunting the robots. However, if you find and complete all of the hidden minigames and then beat the game, then the ghosts of the dead children are finally able to move on as symbolized by the heads no longer having the lights on. Likewise, beating Nightmare (aka Night 6) has you find out that Fazbear's Fright burned down and what little was salvaged will be sold at a public auction.
    • Unfortunately, that includes Springtrap as well.
  • Mythology Gag: Not exactly a gag to this game's mythology, but to another of Scott's works. It's been 30 years since Freddy Fazbear's Pizzeria closed down, which is the same length of time of Earth's last transmission to Lun Infinus.
  • Next Sunday A.D.: This game's events take place in at least 2017 or maybe even farther than that. The first game's pizzeria stayed open until some time after Mike Schmidt was hired. As for the year, it's been guessed that FNAF1 takes place in 1994, judging from the amount of money you earn. So '3' possibly takes place at the farthest in 2024!
  • Nightmare Fetishist: At this point Scott has made Uncanny Valley, completely faceless, and just plain horrifying versions of Bonnie, the only animatronic he admits legitimately scared him.
  • No Name Given: Neither The Murderer, Phone Guy, Phone Dude, or even the protagonist have names.
  • No OSHA Compliance: Well, besides the killer animatronic. Barely functional equipment? Check. Ventilation shafts that go offline and cause hallucinations due to lack of oxygen (or worse)? Check. Purposefully old wiring that's stated to be likely to cause fires? And actually does in the Night 6 ending? Check, check, and check.
  • Nothing Is Scarier:
    • The Phone Dude is not lying when he says that Night 1 is there for you to settle in and get used to the new system. There are no computer errors, and Springtrap is brought in on Night 2, which is where the game begins proper.
    • In the previous two games, the Game Over screen showed what happened to the protagonist after the animatronics catch them. What does this game show? Nothing.
    • When the Phantom Puppet shows up, he merely fills the screen with his face. If you try to move, he moves with you. That's all he does.
    • Phantom Mangle's will just lurk behind the Office window, and make static noises. Then it drops out of sight and the hallucination ends.
  • Officially Shortened Title: The title screen lists the title as FNAF 3.
  • Off-the-Shelf FX: A rather unique version: the entirety of Fazbear's Frights is salvaged stuff from the old Fazbear Pizzeria from the first game. From the layout, to the props, to Springtrap itself. Unfortunately, it ended up too off-the-shelf, what with the faulty security and ventilation systems and the absurd wiring problems.
  • Ominous Music Box Tune: Heard during The Stinger (see below).
    • Also heard during the secret minigames.
  • Ominous Visual Glitch: In one of the hidden minigames, you control Shadow Bonnie. Whenever you go to move, it does so, but its body glitches terribly in the process. Shadow Bonnie actually glitches so badly that it goes into previous minigames as well as a void realm of purple.
    • At the end of each hidden minigame, once you complete it, the screen will glitch up and freeze for a good five or so seconds before it transitions back to the night you were on.
  • One Of These Is Not Like The Others: While most of the phantom hallucinations will merely jump you, the Puppet's hallucination will just sit right in front of you and stare you down. Mangle, similarly, is content with staring at you from the window and making noise, and is the only phantom that won't crash the ventilation.
    • Chica's jumpscare trigger is completely different from the others (It's triggered by staring at an arcade machine with a barely-recognizable, black-and-white image of her face on it, whereas all the others show up in "person" for their triggers), and many players fall for it several times before making the connection.
  • Paranoia Fuel: In-universe. The Phone Dude's talking of fire risk and the legacy of the company leads the protagonist to hallucinate the old animatronics with severe burn damage around the building. At least, that's one interpretation. The other is that the spirits of the children are influencing your hallucinations or that the hallucinations are the killer's ghost's attempts to hinder you to make it easier for Springtrap to kill you. The character sheet for the protagonist also speculates that he might be somewhat precognative and is seeing hints to the building's eventual fate.
    • The Phantoms can be this for the player as well, since you have to manage the technology, and the hallucinations (especially the Phantom Puppet) can give Springtrap some time to find you.
  • Platform Game: The hidden minigames are designed as simplistic Atari-esque platformers.
  • Reality Ensues: All the horrors perpetrated at the Fazbear Pizzeria led to the company going under, the animatronics being scrapped, and everything associated with them becoming a source of public fear and urban legend.
    • The first Phone Dude that calls you tells you to watch out, since there's a probable chance that things could catch on fire. No talk is made of actually fixing these faulty wires. Guess what happens to the building in the Night 6 ending?
  • The Reveal: The "minigame" after Night 5 reveals that the Purple Man accidentally killed himself inside Springtrap in an effort to escape the five children's ghosts. Oh, and he's in control of it.
    • After completing all the minigames, the game reveals that, possibly with the assistance of the Puppet, the victims of the Purple Man finally found peace.
  • Running Gag: The "honk Freddy's nose" gag returns, this time activated by the Freddy cartoon poster.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: Springtrap was left trapped in a sealed room at the Pizzeria from the first game after being the instrument of the Purple Man's demise and having his soul trapped in it until the Frazbear's Fright crew found him and brought him to their attraction, unknowingly setting him free.
  • Sensory Abuse: Some of the Hell Is That Noise entries on this page border on this.
    • There's Phantom Mangle's static that it jump scares you with.
    • There's also the awful dial up-esque droning sound that plays when the Purple Man destroys an animatronic.
  • Sequel Difficulty Drop: Compared to the second game, the third seems to be easier, with only one animatronic. However, the game still has its curve-balls, such as having a new maintenance mechanic to take care of and relying on much more hallucinations to mess the player up. Furthermore, because Fazbear's Fright burnt down after the sixth night, there is no custom night. Justified, because there's only one animatronic to deal with, while the difficulty of the 4/20 and 10/20 modes was based on the A.I. of several animatronics.
  • Sequel Hook: The Night 6 ending says that everything salvaged from Fazbear's Fright after the fire will be sold at a local auction... Furthermore, it is implied that there was another branch of Freddy's out there while Fazbear Entertainment was still in business. Both of these may have been hints to Five Nights at Freddy's: Sister Location.
  • Signing-Off Catch Phrase: All the recordings you get from Phone Guy end with "And as always, remember to smile: you are the face of Freddy Fazbear's Pizza."
  • Series Fauxnale: The story wraps up what happened to the original animatronics after the events of the first game, along with the fate of the murderer, and it seems like that is where the story ends for this series... But then Five Nights at Freddy's 4 and Five Nights at Freddy's: Sister Location come around, showing that the series isn't quite over, though this is still chronologically the last game.
  • Staring Down Cthulhu: Springtrap won't move unless you're looking at him. Usually this doesn't help much given how your camera views go to complete static pretty often (allowing him to move around), but when he's peeking through your door and window you can stare him down until 6 AM or until the ventilation goes offline, you black out, and he kills you.
  • Surfer Dude: The new Phone Guy, judging by his tone, frequent tendencies to crack jokes, and overall enthusiasm.
  • Take That!: Maybe a small one (hopefully just a ribbing) at the fans who make cosplays of the animatronics, usually Foxy, pops up in the first night's phonecall in which Phone Dude says that they've found a Foxy head "Which we think to be authentic... then again it might just be another crappy cosplay."
  • Tempting Fate: In the Night 1 phone call, Phone Guy mentions that they had to make sure that everything works and nothing catches on fire.
  • The Stinger:
    • For the Bad Ending, the image of the four main animatronics' empty heads (Freddy, Bonnie, Chica, and Foxy, along with potentially Golden Freddy in the back) on a floor with their left eyes glowing bright (besides Golden Freddy, whose glowing left eye is bright enough to shine through both eye holes of the mask).
    • The Good Ending, meanwhile, has the exact same image, but the Golden Freddy head is gone and all of the other heads lack the glowing lights, leaving them as empty husks.
  • The Theme Park Version: The new "Freddy's" is now a horror attraction.
  • There Is Another: The phone calls reveal that Fazbear Entertainment had more than one restaurant running simultaneously while it was still in business.
  • Time Skip: The game takes place thirty years after the first game (and the final closure of Freddy Fazbear's Pizza).
  • Too Dumb to Live:
    • The security guard shows up every night to a building where the ventilation stops working every couple of hours, and, oh yeah, there's a killer robot out to get them. A robot taken from an establishment whose claim to fame is robots killing security guards.
    • At least in the first two games, the protagonists were basically trapped in the office by multiple animatronics, with no easy access to an escape route once they became active. But checking CAM 1 reveals that the building has an exit in the hallway directly outside the door, meaning that this game's fellow could simply leave the building at any time.
  • Totally Radical: The new Phone Guy from the first two nights speaks like a Surfer Dude. He then gives the floor over to pre-recorded audio cassettes of the original Phone Guy talking about how to wear and work the animatronic suits. However, as they're both voiced by the same person, it might have been done just to differentiate the two characters.
  • Trailers Always Spoil: Apart from the preview of Springtrap's jumpscare, the trailer has absolutely nothing to do with the game itself. It's referring to events that happen before the game that are only given context in the ending.
  • Tutorial Level: The first night. Unlike the last two games, nothing's out to get you. It's just the new Phone Guy going over exposition and how things work, allowing you to get used to new game mechanics. Justified as on Night 2, he vaguely reveals that the company found an animatronic before he runs off. Probably unaware that the thing can move.
  • Undercrank: The trailer's first look at the new animatronic shows it twitching against a wall. Similarly, its head twitches a lot on the menu.
  • Unperson: Golden Bonnie, who would go on to become Springtrap. After the first spring-lock fatality, Fazbear Entertainment dumped it in a safe room and tried to forget it ever existed (though we know from FNaF 2 that a certain someone remembered it was still back there). The company tried to do the same with Golden Freddy, but the murdered children made that a futile gesture.
  • Visual Pun: The box full of parts from the bright and colorful animatronics debuting in the second game? It's a toy box, of the Fazbear variety.
  • Wham Line: If you listen closely while Springtrap wanders the building, sometimes you hear... things. Further inspection reveals... Springtrap's speaking.
    Springtrap: ...help...me...
  • Wham Episode: The post-fifth night minigame, where we see the Purple Man finally meeting his doom at the hands of the children's ghosts. Also, we see that the Purple Man was killed inside Springtrap, the same animatronic that had been harassing and terrorizing you for the past five nights.
  • Wham Shot: The ending of the Night 5 minigame. Having been cornered by the souls of his victims, the Purple Man panics and tries to hide... inside Springtrap.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: The new Phone Dude appears for the first two nights to talk about the lore going on in the present. Then, he sends you tapes of the old Phone Guy, and never picks up the phone himself for the rest of the game.
    • We actually don't get any confirmation on what happens to Springtrap after the 6th night. If he burned down with the building when it caught fire or sold off at an auction. The only clue is seeing an image of him in the newspaper once you've brighten it.
  • Who's Laughing Now?: Once the Purple Man destroys the animatronics, the children's ghosts are freed and gang up on the Purple Man, leading to him going into and being crushed inside Springtrap.
  • You Are Already Dead: If you see Springtrap looking into your office from the door, or worse, actually entering the office while you have a monitor up, there's not much you can do except wait for him to get you. Even if you don't use a monitor, the vents will eventually fail, and you'll black out, allowing him to move in to kill you.
    • If you're quick enough, you can save yourself from a game over if Springtrap is looking through your door by triggering the audio in CAM 1; however, if you see him run past your monitor while it's up, then you're dead.
    • Phantom BB always toggles your camera to display an image of his head obscuring the video feed before you pull the monitor away and it jumps you. You can avoid the jump-scare by switching to a different camera feed before lowering the monitor.

the endnote 

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Videogame/FiveNightsAtFreddys3