Video Game / Agent Under Fire

The fourth licensed James Bond game from Electronic Arts, that was released in 2001 for sixth generation consoles.

Bond is sent to a rescue CIA agent Zoe Nightshade, which sets off a chain of events that uncovers a sinister plot for world control.

This game has the examples of:

  • A.K.A.-47: Almost every weapon in the game. A few examples:
    • Wolfram P2K — Walther P99
    • IAC Defender — Desert Eagle
    • Koffler & Stock KS7 — Heckler & Koch MP5
    • Munitions Belgique PS100 — FN Herstal P90
  • Barbie Doll Anatomy: There's a scene in which you sneak into a bathroom and can see a womannote  showering. If one uses a gun with a scope, you can zoom in from far enough away that you don't activate the trap (she's a projection, to create a disguised door) and you can see that she fits this trope, having no nipples.
  • Big Bad: Adrian Malprave and Nigel Bloch. Malprave is the senior partner but takes little part in the action while Bloch is the Final Boss, mirroring Renard and Elektra's relationship in The World Is Not Enough; Bloch even looks like Renard. Given that Agent Under Fire was originally supposed to be a PS2 adaptation of The World Is Not Enough...
  • Bond One-Liner: If you choose to push The Jackal off instead of shooting her to death, M calls asking what happened. Bond's response? "She's fallen for me." That's just one of many.
  • Chair Reveal: The original Reginald Griffin's corpse is revealed this way.
  • Cloning Blues: The world leaders and Zoe Nightshade are subject to this
  • Convection Schmonvection: Averted in the underground rail shooter level. Bloch opens the floor to reveal a lava pit, and the player slowly loses health to the heat.
  • Crosshair Aware: The snipers have some very conspicuous laser sights. You get shot if you happen to cross them.
  • Dropped a Bridge on Her: Malprave's death. No close-up, no one liner, just blows up with the factory.
  • Elite Mook: The clone of Griffin, who takes 3 shots from the dart gun before going down, as opposed to the 1 every one of the soldiers took.
  • Evil Laugh: You know it's the clone of Bloch if half of his dialogue consists of going "Mwahahahahaha!"
  • Evil Plan: The bad guys are going to kill world leaders and replace them with clones that answer to them.
  • Faux Action Girl: Zoe Nightshade. She spends half the game captured, and in one level, it is entirely possible for her to be taken hostage by the bad guys twice.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Malprave detonates the warheads within her Alpine base to self-destruct in a last attempt to kill Bond. She instead is blown up in her own office after failing to evacuate while Bond jumps to safety. Truly a case of Death by Irony.
  • Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy: The mooks are like this, due in part to every automatic weapon having horrendous accuracy past five meters or so. They can usually hit reliably with most handguns... after a few shots... assuming they live that long.
  • Jetpack: Bond uses a really bizarre jetpack. At first, it seems to act like a typical jetpack, capable of decelerating a fall, but it only lifts him up a few feet in standard gameplay. What's more, it seems to run on nothing more than compressed air—it can be refilled at any refill station. Later on, Nigel Bloch gets one of his own, and it works on a similar principle to Bond's.
  • Jiggle Physics: Malprave in her introductory scene.
  • Malevolent Mugshot: Adrian Malprave, a CEO with a penchant for figure-hugging outfits, glares down at Bond from a stained glass window hanging over her desk.
  • Mega Corp.: Malprave Industries.
  • Mundane Made Awesome: R finishes listing the (impressive) combat upgrades to Bond's car with "and of course, a refrigerated beverage holder."
  • No-Gear Level: You can actually prevent this from happening, if you find a keycard before you enter the submarine in the Poseidon level.
  • Oil Slick: One of the gadgets in the driving missions.
  • See-Thru Specs: They allow Bond to see hidden panels.
  • Shoe Phone: The game has a cell phone that also comes with a laser, a password cracker, a switch activator, and a grapple hook that can somehow extend for 10 meters or more.
  • Shower Scene: There's one in the sixth mission. Turns out, it was actually R.
  • Stealth Mission: A couple, Bad Diplomacy and Cold Reception, which are coincidentally back to back.
  • Super Drowning Skills: The oil rig level, Bond can fall into the ocean if he's not careful, leading to a lost life. This would be justifiable to an extent if it was averting the Soft Water trope, but since he starts the level on some pipes just feet above the surface, and ends the level falling into a pool of water, there is no excuse.
  • Tactical Suicide Boss: Nigel Bloch, both times. If he didn't drop his rocket launcher in the final battle, all he'd have to do is float there with his jetpack until the withdrawing floor beneath you finally collapses and drops Bond into the pit. Earlier, he'd have been invulnerable if he hadn't called in the mooks that helpfully provide you with the rocket launcher when killed, nor would there have been a problem if he had chosen not to stop the fans protecting the air vents above the geothermal power station. On top of this, Bond never would have been able to locate and destroy the cloning facility had Bloch not shoved him into the pool that leads to it and instead shot Bond in the head while he was Distracted by the Sexy.
  • Unexpected SHMUP Level: The second mission. The first mission is standard FPS controls. The second? Rail shooter. Then it's a driving mission.
    Bond: (to Zoe) Keep a flying grip on the wheel, I'll hold them off!
    • Gets more strange on the second driving mission, as halfway through the mission, you go from driving your Cool Car to a Tank on rails through the streets of Bucharest.
  • Would Hit a Girl: Bloch does this to the tied up clone Zoe Nightshade when we first see them.
  • Yodel Land: An Alpine base holding the original world leaders is the last level.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/AgentUnderFire