Troubled Production / Web Original

  • The That Guy with the Glasses anniversary Massive Multiplayer Crossovers:
    • While the Brawl wasn't as bad, it still had problems. In a blog post, Lindsay Ellis said that the reviewers had yet to form the sense of camaraderie that there was in later crossovers, plus, among other things, an unnamed reviewer (implied to be That Aussie Guy) spread lies about Lindsay's sex life.
    • Kickassia. Almost everyone involved was injured somehow, the worst being cameraman Rob Walker getting a nasty leg injury on the first day, but he was still quite a Determinator as he kept cramming himself into tight places and waiting until filming was over to seek any medical attention. Also, Lord Kat twisted both his ankles, which forced his role to be severely reduced, and the extremely tight four day filming schedule meant that the climax had to be significantly trimmed down, with scenes like Spoony revealing himself to still be Insano never being filmed.
    • Suburban Knights was even worse, with the weather causing so many problems that Doug Walker was fully prepared to scrap the whole thing, until everyone banded together and convinced him they were willing to get the film done whatever it took.
      • Thankfully, injures were minimal compared to Kickassia. However, the few that did happen created controversy shortly before SK came out. During filming, Elisa of Team NChick was duct taped to a wall and got a little overheated. Somehow this got interpreted as "crucified upside-down" and one of the site's biggest critics used this info to try and "ruin" TGWTG. Thankfully it didn't go anywhere.
    • To Boldly Flee had the smoothest production time, but it wasn't without its problems. The biggest hurdle was the majority of the cast filming a 3-hour film in the span of a week, leaving little time for rest. Doug was forgoing sleep and food to finish filming and was getting very emotional while filming his scenes. This was partly due to him incorrectly assuming that he was putting the other actors through too much stress. Post-production was also troublesome, as there were problems uploading the files. This resulted in each part being released every three days rather than once a day as the previous two specials. The stress everyone goes through and the Troubled Productions are why Doug swore off big crossover events and why The Uncanny Valley was an anthology.
  • That Dude in the Suede's review of the 4th Pokemon movie had to be this for sure. Jesuotaku and Suede were already quite busy beforehand, making scheduling recording quite hard. Not all the details have been made clear, but the suicide of former Channel Awesome contributor JewWario had to have made production awkward. The final cut of the review featured JewWario's voice for about the first 3 minutes. It is unknown if it is all of the audio he had recorded or the episode, and he had to be written out using some clever dialogue. His voice is clearly someone else trying to do an impression of him during the last few seconds in order to get him out of the review.
  • Episodes of The Time... Guys come out very infrequently. Going by the apparent age of the cast and by Word of God, filming can only take place during school breaks. This has actually worked out well; newer episodes usually come out as shorts instead of the less tolerable twenty-minute epics they were originally.
  • On a smaller scale, the big crossover review between The Nostalgia Critic, Spoony and Linkara for Alone in the Dark (2005). To begin with, Doug Walker had lost his voice the day before Spoony and Linkara arrived in Chicago (hence the use of text-to-speech). Secondly, construction work was being done outside Doug's house, so they had to film the review in Doug's basement. In addition, they didn't decide which Uwe Boll movie to review until the day they started writing. Spoony gives the scoop here.
    • Similarly, not as bad as the other examples, the MAGfest review of The Last Airbender turned out to be incredibly difficult and rushed. A detailed explanation of all the problems and issues is in the commentary, but, for starters, that shot of the DVD case with The Last Airbender in it hitting the ground which lasts less than one second? It took them something like fifty takes to get that one shot.
    • Doug Walker and Lewis Lovhaug have both referred to their crossover review of Superman IV: The Quest for Peace as a cursed review. Several introductions were filmed and scrapped (in one instance, the footage filmed around the same time as the Alone in the Dark (2005) review was lost), and it kept getting pushed back after Walker did a Top 11 countdown of the stupidest moments of the Superman film series.
  • It was mentioned that a few stories in the Metamor Keep universe fell flat on their faces because of this. One author suffered a brain aneurysm, and another came down with pneumonia.
  • The Fan Film series BIONICLE: The Next Generation currently resides deep in Development Hell because of this. It started out as an ambitious 3D animation film project on the BZ Power forums, shortly before the forum server crashed. The project was moved to a new site, and it was decided that instead of feature-length films, they would make a series of shorts. The modeling had to be started over because the older models suffered from problems. Then, the project leaders left one by one, along with many other disillusioned members. When the BZPower forum came back, the community branded the project a futile undertaking. Since the team struggled with the 3D CGI, they split into different animation groups. Only the 2D team managed to get a test video done, effectively proving that the 3D angle has been doomed from the start. The new project leader then tried to sort out the whole thing and start over with more realistic goals, before leaving to pursuit a more fruitful endeavor. Currently, it seems that the project's fate rests in the hands of the still-working 3D team.
    • The earlier Quest of the Toa fan-movie has met a similar fate. Production was well underway with a big buzz surrounding the would-be voice actors and the script receiving tons of rewrites due to plotting difficulties. Then, the animation files got lost, and the project, which had been aiming for a late-2006 release date, was canceled in 2007. It resurfaced a few years later with a new and improved models, but went under again in 2010. Given that it was to be made by one person who did everything from directing to modeling and animating, and the fandom had become distilled and disjointed by that time, this is understandable.
  • Production on The Game Overthinker stalled out in early 2013 due to a combination of snowstorms making it impossible to shoot the outdoor scenes that had been set up, and Bob Chipman committing himself to too many things at once (particularly an appearance at PAX East). He goes into more detail on the causes of the delay in this video.
  • A tiny version involving Rooster Teeth: one episode of "Let's Play Minecraft" ended up having being restarted from scratch when a brief power outage killed their X-Boxes and the recording footage was lost. One of the guys playing, Jack, was very distraught because he was in the lead in that episode's game and having to restart meant losing everything.
  • With Let's Plays in general, it's also common for somebody to lose footage or desync. GO! gets hit with this the worst, as everybody is playing separate games so they can't use someone else's footage to fill it in. It's not unusual to see somebody's footage replaced by a black screen saying "This footage was lost", even if they win.
  • Although a mild case, Roosterteeth's original web show RWBY received a two month delay for its third volume following the death of series creator Monty Oum in February of 2015. Usually premiering the first episode at RTX in August, the crew could only provide a trailer compromised clips from the first few episodes at the convention.
  • Another Dead Hero had himself a rough case of this with his first episode Children of the Corn III: Urban Harvest, which due to not only computer troubles with his editing software going haywire, but also the finished episode becoming so corruptible, he couldn't save it, making it a lost episode. It took him till a couple more months before he released his first official released review, part one of Necronomicon: Book of the Dead. Though, now he's kinda ran into this again, due to losing the camera he used to film the episode and the next two.
  • Death Battle suffered one when their animators' hard drive crashed when they were getting ready to compile the files for the Gamera profile section, also causing them to lose progress on the Zechs Merquise vs. Tommy Oliver battle. They had to push back the Zechs vs. Tommy battle and use Batman vs. Captain America instead.
  • The 2014 Mountain Dew Game Jam involving several famous indie developers and YouTube celebrities fell apart for several reasons:
    • The first bad sign was a contract that practically told the participants they would be subject to Manipulative Editing and that the Game Jam could not be shown publicly on YouTube, which came as a disappointment to the devs as they wished to show their viewers the making of a game.
    • While the concept of a Game Jam is that of relaxed, friendly competition, the participants had to deal with Matti Leshem, an overbearing producer sent by Mountain Dew and not reined in by Polaris until it was too late. Leshem was determined to turn the game jam into a reality show and would try to put people against each other, encourage prima donna behavior, and would only allow Mountain Dew and water to be drunk on set (and the water had to be drunk out of Mountain Dew bottles). Furthermore, Leshem demanded that the participants grin and pose dramatically every time they had a drink, constantly forcing them to do retakes.
    • The prizes were incredibly lame, which wasn't helped by Leshem's insistence that the participants cheer and clap enthusiastically when they were announced, again forcing them through several retakes.
    • The Youtube celebrities were only brought in for publicity and had little experience actually making a game, which, combined with arbitrary challenges, note  made it nigh impossible to actually get work done.
    • When Zoe Quinn and JonTron had a small disagreement and stepped outside to discuss it peacefully, Leshem and his camera crew surrounded them and tried to play it off as an intense, heated argument. When the two separated, they chased JonTron down and tried to coerce him into saying negative things about Quinn, which he refused to do.
    • Leshem tried to start a "Battle of the Sexes" by badgering the teams with sexist questions such as "Do you think you're at an advantage because you have a pretty girl on your team?" and "Do you think the teams with women on them are at a disadvantage?" and actually seemed disappointed when they didn't "play along".
    • Finally Leshem was expelled from the event, but the damage was done. Over half the developers quit and the jam was shut down after one day. Angry Joe recounts his experience in his Top 10 Gaming controversies of 2014 video, noting that the production costs ranged somewhere between $250,000 to $400,000 for a Game Jam that doesn't exist.
  • My Little Pony: The Mentally Advanced Series constantly fell under this, thanks to constantly getting pinged for copyright infringement by overzealous Content ID claims, eventually leading to a Missing Episode. Then they tried only using screenshots to get around that and it worked...for a while until the claims came again, leading to another Missing Episode. By then, Greg decided to do it himself and rebooted the series with his own artwork...and that's when the audio started getting pinged. What's worse, according to Greg, it's by a copyright troll claiming on music in the public domain. That latest claim also threatens the Rainbow Dash Presents videos since they use the same outro.
    • Speaking of RDP, the more elaborate the video got, the likelier it got delayed. One video had intended for them to team up with some cast members of Friendship is Witchcraft, but the Witchcraft crew took offense at a joke and left in a huff, exacerbating the already bitter rivalry between the two. Equestria Primates, intended to be the Grand Finale to the RDP series, ended up scrapped altogether because there was no way they could finish in time (especially since Petriep, the artist, went pro) and it wasn't funny enough to justify continuing it. All that's left is a couple pieces of concept art on Petriep's DeviantArt and a video that showed the first four or so minutes of Equestria Primates. Despite reviving RDP for a one off-The Star in Yellow-and leaving open the possibility of more episodes, Equestria Primates is unlikely to be revived for the above reasons, and also because the voice actor for Jokermort is no longer available (due to breaking up with Greg).
  • Even though it's a little-known show 2Beats+, a music review show made by Shoegazer Productions, had an extremely troubled first season that can easily give most of the examples on this page a run for their money:
    • The show couldn't even get a smooth start. Creator Randy McNeely had just been kicked out of his band, Ocean Void, and talked about an idea for a web series with his best friend of 15 years, Alan Zuvy in summer of 2013. Alan, in an attempt to try to bring his friend out of his depression, talked to Randy about collaborating on the project. Randy accepted, but there was a problem. Alan was not the most enthusiastic music listener, and decided to part with the project in 2014, before shooting had even started. He would, however, appear in videos as one of the "henchmen".
    • Randy started searching for a new partner when Jordan Dansdil joined in late 2014. With both being inexperienced in the art of video-making, it was, as Randy put it "a rocky start". They struggled with shooting and the editing software. Early episodes of the series show remnants of the awkward process.
    • Footage would frequently go missing, leading to reshoots. At one point, Jordan can be seen having shaved from a reshot scene. Because both of them had full-time jobs, this caused a great deal of stress. Eventually, due to constant pressure from Randy to get the show from an amateur-level "hobbyist" videos to something that "could compete with some of the professionals" Jordan dismissed himself from the project after the 9th episode in April of 2015.
    • Randy started a second show for The Lost Media Wiki called The Lost Media Chronicles, which got dramatically more views and upvotes than the demanding 30-minute-long episodes of 2Beats+. This lead new viewers who subscribed to the channel for The Chronicles to view 2Beats+ as an annoyance. Randy would attempt to alternate between the 2 shows to appease viewers, but all this did was cause arguments between fans of both shows, as production times for each got longer as demand for both shows to increase in quality also went up.
    • Eventually Randy got a new creative partner, Trey Holt, and as the editing and production got cleaner, the same cannot be said about the technical issues. Randy's skits started getting more ambitious, leading to Trey having to get more creative with the editing. It doesn't help that Randy started creating an "over-arching storyline" that had recurring characters.
    • Then, the Radiohead review came, which was intended to be a season finale, and things got really dramatic. For starters, there was a character introduced that wore a mask and spoke with a Russian accent named "Tony" played by the guitarist from Randy's Ocean Void days. The finale was supposed to contain the "big reveal" with an epilogue explaining his experience with the band. Unfortunately, though, when Part 3 of Radiohead came, the actor flaked, causing Randy to have to re-write the video at the last minute and was forced to have to re-shoot footage. To make matters worse, right when production was starting to wrap up with the editing, Randy's laptop got stolen, leading to Trey being the sole video editor and even more footage having to be shot. On new years of 2016, Randy discovered 2 of his roommates (one of whom is a 2B+ cast member) had become drug addicts, and he had to, very understandably, shift his focuses elsewhere. This caused both part 3 and the epilogue of the first season to be postponed by over 2 weeks.
    • 2Beats+ continues to remain largely obscure, but the few people that watch it say it's great if you can get into the over-arching storyline and oddball skits. Time will only tell if it gains an audience and if Season 2 will be any less stressful than season 1.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/TroubledProduction/WebOriginal