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Series: The Adventures Of Shirley Holmes
Elementary, my dear Bo.

"You cops just keep getting younger and younger!"
— Some homeless woman to Shirley.

A Canadian kids' show from The Nineties about Shirley, the great-grandniece of the legendary Sherlock Holmes, who solves crimes in the fictional town of Redington, where she lives with her father Robert, a British diplomat, and her grandmother Peggy.

Shirley's Dr. Watson is Bo Sawchuck, a street-smart former gang-member whom Shirley meets in detention; she helps him get out of trouble and they become best friends and sleuthing partners. Likewise, her Moriarty counterpart is Molly Hardy, a scheming, sociopathic mastermind of a teenage girl that is admired by everybody who doesn't know her true nature.

The show aired for four seasons in YTV. It was well received by both the audience and the critics, winning several awards during its run. It aired in over 80 countries, and was dubbed in eight languages. There was buzz of a movie possibly being made, but it never materialized. As of now, there hasn't been an official DVD release.


The Adventures Of Shirley Holmes provides examples of:

  • Alien Abduction: "The Case of the Alien Abductions" featured a faked one. Still, you have to wonder how Peggy got that mark on her.
  • Amateur Sleuth: Shirley.
  • Blondes are Evil: Molly.
  • Born Detective: Shirley, by virtue of being a Holmes. Even her father Robert tries to get in on the sleuthing action a few times.
  • The Chessmaster: Molly, in many of her plots and plans.
  • Clear Their Name: Shirley has to do this two times. In the pilot, she has to prove against the belief of police and school that Bo isn't the arsonist in the neighborhood. She does it again when her father gets accused of abusing his diplomatic status to sell information to another country.
  • Con Man: Brian in "The Case of the King of Hearts."
  • Diplomatic Impunity: Robert Holmes was once accused of abusing his diplomatic status to sell information to another country. In another episode, it was believed he was harboring a suspected murderer (a woman who turned out to be innocent). The police officer interrogating him acknowledged he couldn't arrest Holmes but warned he could lose his job over that. That risk was quite real.
  • The Ditz: Alicia, but she can be quite smart sometimes, too.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: The only time Molly genuinely cares about someone is when she learns that her horse has to be put to sleep. The look on her face is gut-wrenching. Not that this makes her show the slightest bit of gratitude to Shirley for saving said horse.
    Molly: Of course you realize nothing's changed.
  • Everybody Hates Mathematics: Bo and Parker, especially. In "Calculated Crime," Sussex Academy suddenly eliminates math from its curriculum...
    Bart: Do you know what that means?
    Bo: Yes. I'm having the luckiest day of my life, possibly of anyone's life, ever.
  • Good with Numbers: Matt. He went to a special school for genius kids and everything. Bo is a complete aversion, Matt even helps him with the answers in a math-based Game Show so he'll be able to get in as well.
    Bo: Some geniuses! They can't even count.
    Matt: They're calculating pi.
    Bo: Oh.
  • Heir Club for Men: As revealed in the intro, Sherlock Holmes expected a "young man" to solve his puzzle. Shirley didn't seem to mind.
    • In "The Case of the Rising Moon", a Princess was being targeted because some of her subjects didn't like the idea of a woman being their ruler.
  • Insufferable Genius: Shirley is a downplayed version of this: She doesn't mean to appear arrogant and is, in fact, a genuinely nice person, but her inquisitiveness and intelligence are often a source of annoyance to others.
  • Kid Detective: Of course. Even more so in the Winklemania books, where Shirley is eight.
  • Left the Background Music On: The background music from one scene of Shirley spying on a new student in "The Case of the Rising Moon" turned out to be a student playing a flute.
  • Lovable Nerd: Bart has quite a few admirers among the fandom. Also Matt.
  • Love Martyr: Stink for Molly, at least in the beginning.
  • Missing Mom: Shirley's mother, Joanna, went missing in Rwanda before the show started. Shirley finds her and rescues her in the season three finale.
  • Nice Hat: Shirley has a plethora of them, they're her signature look.
  • Not Allowed to Grow Up: The producers named a growth spurt in the cast as a reason for cancelling the show.
  • Obfuscating Stupidity: Peggy Holmes has shades of this sometimes. Some other times, she's more of a Bunny-Ears Lawyer. Also Shirley often "disguises" herself as a ditz when she's trying to find clues.
  • Official Couple: Shirley and Matt.
  • The Prankster: Stink.
  • Punny Name: Molly Hardy. Say it fast enough, and you'll get it. Incidentally, the Winklemania books had Molly Harty.
    • Not to mention Shirley herself - of course she could have been as good a detective even if her parents had named her Jane or Sarah or whatever, but that wouldn't sound as punny.
  • Recap Episode: "The Case of the Puzzle from the Past."
  • Screwed by the Network: In the United States, FOX Family Channel (now ABC Family) only aired the first two seasons on Saturdays and Sundays before it stopped airing the show. To add insult to injury, the episodes were usually aired out of order.
  • Shout-Out: In "The Case of the Dead Debutante", Alicia mentions that she learned how to cast spells on people by watching Buffy.
  • Side Kick: Bo.
  • Small Name, Big Ego: Molly's major weakness. "The Case of The Broken Oath" is a good example of this. Molly creates an anonymous internet account using the name "Y" and blackmails up-and-coming rock band Oath into performing the terrible song that she wrote. When Shirley gets a copy of the lyrics to the song, she discovers that the first letter of the first word in each verse spells out "Molly Hardy." When Shirley confronts Molly, she points out that if she could have gotten away with the scheme if she'd resisted the impulse to literally put her name on it. Molly ends up getting away with it anyway, by blackmailing Shirley with the threat of exposing her detective work (which would obviously make it much more difficult).
  • The Sociopath: Molly is directly referred to as one by a psychologist who analyzes her as part of her attempting to get an important job at the United Nations. Needless to say, she becomes obsessed with trying to find and destroy all the copies of the psychologist's report.
  • Spin-Offspring: Shirley is Sherlock Holmes' great-grandniece, presumably descended from one of Sherlock's older brothers.
  • Stuffy Brit: While he's far from being emotionless, Shirley's father is a quiet, reserved man who enjoys his morning tea, some posh activities and never goes overboard with showing his emotions. Come to think of it, Shirley herself sometimes has shades of this as well. Well, considering their family history.
  • Sympathy for the Devil: At the end of "The Case of the Crooked Comic", Shirley says that she feels pity for Molly, because she's so empty inside that she'll never know true friendship.
  • Those Two Guys: Parker. Well, he's only one guy but he doesn't really fit in that other trope as much as he does in this one.
  • Tomato in the Mirror: In "The Case of the Left Thumbprint", someone steals a valuable decoder from Shirley's home. Shirley suspects that the same someone left a dead bird on her bed, put a sheet over a dollhouse, and set fire to some incriminating evidence, but they didn't. The person who did those things was Shirley herself. The stress of her father being suspected of theft caused her to sleepwalk and unconsciously leave clues to the mystery that she would find once she was awake.
  • Ungrateful Bastard: Shirley saves Molly from being burned to death by Elyse and stops her Morality Pet horse from being put to death due to a fake case of rabies. Does this change Molly's attitude towards her? Nope.
  • Viewers Are Morons: A possible reason why "Detective" was added to the show's title when the series was broadcast in the U.S. Because no one would assume anyone named Holmes could be a detective.
  • Villain with Good Publicity: Molly. Up to the very end she's got everybody convinced she's a model student. Only Shirley and Bo see her sociopathic side, initially.
  • Visionary Villain: It's implied that Molly plans to use her job at the United Nations, her budding social media presence and other connections to end up controlling the tastes and trends of her entire generation.
  • What Would X Do?: In "Mysterious Message," Shirley gets herself locked inside a safe while looking for her grandmother. Bo, Bart and Alicia think she's been kidnapped and set out to look for her, and to decide how to go about this, they wonder "What would Shirley do?"
  • Wicked Stepmother: In "The Case of the Rising Moon", a princess was fearing for her life and believed her stepmother was the culprit. Subverted when it's revealed the stepmother was innocent and the plot had been engineered by people who didn't want a woman to rule their nation - the stepmother's son was the next in line to inherit the throne, which gave the princess a reason to believe her stepmother was guilty in the first place.

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alternative title(s): The Adventures Of Shirley Holmes
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