Spaceship Slingshot Stunt

The Crew of the Cool Starship is on the verge of a planet's gravity well or near an Unrealistic Black Hole. Perhaps they are too close for the engines to escape gravity's grasp. Perhaps an enemy ship is closing them. All seems lost...

Then the Ace Pilot makes a suggestion: Head straight for the planet / black hole! The rest of the crew look at him as if he was mad, but follow his plan, and like magic, they pick up speed and wind up shooting out of the gravity well at incredible speed using gravity to perform a slingshot maneuver (also called Gravity Assist or Gravitational Slingshot) and escape!

Of course, pulling a successful Slingshot maneuver would require some precise maneuvering and calculations, but often in fiction, it's entirely possible for the Ace Pilot to just eyeball it.note  Because the pilot is just that good.

Invariably, when the move is first suggested, almost everyone is incredulous, and it always fools the enemy. Almost like no one has ever heard of a slingshot maneuver before, or is able to spot when the other side is about to perform one. And, of course, the maneuver is always used as a last-ditch desperation maneuver, rather than a standard tactic or move.

Often used as an Establishing Character Moment if it occurs early in the work, to show the Ace Pilot's skills. If calculations are made, it might act as such a moment for The Smart Guy, too.

The closest thing in real life to what the pilot does is entering an unstable orbit. But no matter what, that black hole is definitely pulling you in, and if you can't generate enough force to escape the gravitational field directly, you're probably screwed.

In Real Life, gravity assists are a well-known and often-used phenomenon and have far wider applications (and limitations) than those depicted in fiction. The Other Wiki does a good job explaining the ramifications.

See also Gravity Sucks, Unrealistic Black Hole, and Space Friction, which may factor into the maneuver. Sometimes combined with a Wronski Feint if the enemy is tricked into following and can't escape.

Examples:

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    Anime and Manga 
  • In the Endless Waltz OVA to Mobile Suit Gundam Wing, Quatre uses the gravity exerted by Venus to fling his ship back to Earth, because they are low on both time and fuel.
  • Irresponsible Captain Tylor. Emi and Yumi get caught in a gravity well on their maiden flight, so Kojiro talks them through this manoeuvre, only to find their course intersects with an asteroid field on the other side of the planet.
  • Both the Earth and Martian forces in Aldnoah.Zero make use of slingshot maneuvers during space combat, but that's not the impressive part. The impressive part is Slaine firing off two volleys of bullets at a seemingly anonymous patch of sky before the battle, only for the bullets to slingshot around the Earth and come down to shoot his ally Saazbaum In the Back at the climax of the episode, with just enough time between the volleys for Slaine to explain his treachery to the disbelieving Saazbaum.

    Comic Books 
  • In one issue of Kid Gravity, a Disney Adventures comic, Kid Gravity uses this to escape a black hole, with his nemesis wondering how such a feat is even physically possible. Upon returning to school Gravity is punished for breaking the laws of physics.
  • In one of the Futurama comics Leela did this with the Planet Express ship to avoid being late to class, unfortunately destabilizing the star she sling-shot around.
  • An aquatic version in Prince Valiant, involving Val's trireme becoming caught in the whirlpool Charybdis from Greek Mythology. One of their rowers turns out to be a fisherman from the area in his day job, and he advises them to row with the current, which allows them to accelerate out. They later make use of this to wreck the entire Roman navy in a Wronski Feint.

    Film 
  • In the Lost in Space movie, time travel has taught Professor Robinson that they can't escape the gravity of the collapsing planet — but he figures out that they can escape it by diving through it as it's breaking up. Another character (Major West) does the driving, though.
  • Real Life: Apollo 13's service module was too damaged to fire for a direct abort, and the lunar module engine didn't have enough power. Only a slingshot maneuver around the moon, assisted by the lunar module engines, could get them on a course for home. Granted, they were already on a semi-slingshot course, but since they'd left the 'free return trajectory' from earlier missions and would have missed Earth without it, it still likely counts. Depicted in the Apollo 13 movie.
  • Inverted with the aerobraking maneuver in 2010: The Year We Make Contact, used to reduce the Leonov's speed so it can enter Jupiter's orbit. Not that it's any less dramatic with a fire-enshrouded spaceship tearing through the upper atmosphere.
  • Kamen Rider Super Sentai: Super Hero Taisen has Kamen Rider Fourze and Red Buster and Blue Buster piloting the Double Rocket Drill Go-Buster-Oh around Saturn to slingshot around and deliver a Rider Kick onto Big Machine.
  • In Interstellar, the Endurance slingshots the black hole Gargantua in order to get up to the speed needed for the onward flight to Edmunds' planet.
    • It's worth noting, however, that Gargantua is not an Unrealistic Black Hole. It is very realistic, and the way the Endurance pulls off the maneuver is pretty much how it should be done when done with a black hole, simplified for the audience.

    Literature 
  • Used a few times in the Star Wars Expanded Universe:
  • Combined with a Wronski Feint in The Privateer by James Doohan and S.M. Sterling. The damaged light carrier Invincible has a Mollie flotilla in hot pursuit, so it heads for a recently discovered system that has a pulsar perilously close to the jump point. Since they're expecting it, they're able to slingshot around the pulsar and back to the jump point to escape. The Mollies aren't so lucky; they end up smeared across its surface with their very atoms crushed into degenerate matter.
  • In the Humanx Commonwealth novel The Tar-Aiym Krang, the protagonists use a neutron star as an FTL slingshot to escape pursuing AAnn, who refuse to follow due to the danger of the maneuver.
  • A strikingly realistic depiction of a gravity turn, a real-world technique for achieving a stable orbit, appears in The Last Hero of all books.
  • In the Star Carrier series Space Fighters' main drive system is a singularity drive, which generates a high-gravity field ahead of the ship to pull it forward. If generated to the side of a fighter, the drive allows for extremely tight high-speed turns via gravity assist. However this is extremely dangerous: the slightest perturbation of the turn, like, say, getting hit by gunfire from a Turusch Planet Spaceship, can send the fighter into a spin that will disintegrate it in seconds.
  • End Run features an escort carrier making a raid behind enemy lines in the Kilrathi home system of Kilrah that uses a gravity slingshot around a gas giant in the system to make an escape after sustaining significant damage during the raid. However, the configuration of the system and the nature of FTL travel in the Wing Commander universe means that the only escape path using that slingshot is a string of single-exit star systems before making it to a Confed held system.
  • In the Great Ship series, humanity claimed the derelict Greatship while it was streaking towards the Milky Way at a significant fraction of the speed light, and slung it around a red dwarf to put it in the galactic plane, where they turned it into a cruise ship of sorts by granting berths in exchange for technology, colonization rights, and pledges of assistance. At the climax of Marrow, the ship is seized as it slings around another star to keep it within the Milky Way; the mutineer attempts to direct the ship into the star to destroy the ship and release whatever is contained within Marrow, the planet in the ship's core
  • In Ciaphas Cain: The Last Ditch the ship carrying Cain and the 597th is damaged transiting from the Warp because the Geller fields keeping its denizens out glitched and let a daemon onto the bridge. They're forced to use their target planet to do a gravity assist and to slow down with the upper atmosphere in order to slow down enough to get everyone off the ship before it goes careening off into space.

    Live Action Television 
  • Stargate SG-1
    • A slingshot maneuver around Jupiter is attempted by O'Neill and Teal'c in "Tangent," but the attempt fails as the rockets they used (the pair of Sidewinder missiles their Space Fighter prototype is armed with) lacked thrust.
    • At the end of "The Pegasus Project" the Odyssey successfully pulls one around a black hole, after goading a Wraith Hive Ship to follow them. They make it, while the Hive Ship has no such luck due to the Odyssey using the fact that the black hole is disrupting their systems to beam a nuke inside the ship.
  • Stargate Universe:
    • One of Destiny's shuttles attempts the maneuver around a planet to catch up to Destiny itself.
    • Destiny also performed an aerobraking maneuver around a Gas Giant to slingshot it into a Sun. It's later revealed that this was intentional and flying into stars is how the ship refuels.
  • Star Trek:
    • Warp-powered gravitational slingshots are used a method of time travel in the franchise, especially in Star Trek: The Original Series and Star Trek IV.
    • Conventional slingshots without time travels feature in Star Trek: The Animated Series episode "Beyond the Farthest Star" and Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Booby Trap".
    • One episode of Star Trek: Voyager had Janeway attempting to drive an alien force that had been experimenting on her crew off by flying between a pair of pulsars. Tuvok remarks that it's a far more reckless course of action than he'd come to expect from her. The aliens leave rather than face the pulsars, but Voyager flies through, counting on their momentum to help them escape. Once they're safe on the other side, Janeway remarks she didn't know Tuvok thought she was reckless, to which he responds, "Poor choice of words, Captain. It was clearly an understatement."
  • Andromeda starts this way. They attempt to slingshot around a black hole but sabotage leaves them stranded in orbit so close to the black hole that from their point of view a few seconds went by, while a whole 300 years passed in the rest of the galaxy.
  • Integral to the pilot of Farscape. Proving the feasibility of this maneuver is the whole reason John went into space with Farscape One. By the conclusion of the pilot, he proves his theory using Moya, with Aeryn Sun piloting and him doing the calculations on the floor, using the maneuver to escape the Peacekeepers. He performs the maneuver several times throughout the series, trying to recreate the accident that sent him to that part of space. The only thing he knows is that it involved this maneuver and a solar flare.

    Music 

    Pinball 
  • Done in Sega Pinball's Apollo 13 for the "Moon's Gravity" Mission, where the player can slingshot a pinball around the Moon up and over it (actually done via a magnet).
  • Stern Electronics' Orbitor 1 was a pinball game built around this trope, using a warped transparent playfield to allow pinballs to slingshot around bumpers and other obstacles.

    Real Life 
  • Apollo 13 was launched by NASA in 1970 as the planned third manned mission to land on the moon. An explosion in the oxygen tank of Apollo 13's service module rendered the spacecraft's core systems and main propulsion engine inoperable. Forced to rely on the limited power of the command and lunar modules, Apollo 13 used the Moon's gravity for a circumlunar return.
  • Slingshot manouevres around Jupiter and its moons were used to give the Voyager spacecraft the extra impetus and direction to go onwards to encounter Uranus and Neptune. Otherwise they would have run out of fuel and propulsive power and taken a lot longer to reach the outermost planets.

    Table Top Games 
  • Starfire, Nexus magazine #2 article "Incidents from the First Terran-Khanate War". When a Terran ship first encountered a ship of the Khanate of Orion, the Terran commander was under orders to obtain information about the other side before leaving. He altered course to make a tight high-speed parabolic course around a nearby Khanate planet so he could scan it and use the planet's gravity to return to the warp point at maximum speed. He had to fight (and destroy) a Khanate ship while performing this maneuver.

    Theme Parks 
  • Mission: SPACE involves a trip to Mars, started off with a slingshot assist around the moon. Even then, it takes three months to get to Mars, which is passed over by putting the crew in hypersleep for most of that trip.

    Video Games 
  • The Star Control games features top-down 2D maps where two ships at a time duke it out, usually complete with a planet in the middle to act as a hazard and a gravity well. Using the planet's gravity to slingshot yourself across the map (or to trap an enemy ship) is a cornerstone of the game's combat style.
  • A Difficult but Awesome way of saving fuel in Kerbal Space Program.
  • Also possible in Orbiter.

    Western Animation 
  • Used in Green Lantern: The Animated Series where Hal Pilots a ship Into a pinhole (miniature black hole), making it "skip" over the accretion disk like a stone over water which somehow lets the ship shoot out of the pinhole's event horizon towards safety. Made further confusing when earlier in the episode the gravity was strong enough to "spaghetti" the prow of the ship, yet when later they are much closer to The pinhole, skipping on its accretion disk, the ship suffers no structural damage.