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Mass Monster Slaughter Sidequest
Translation for the Funetik Aksent-impaired: "I want you to kill six snow moose."

"I do hate when games do this. Ask me to kill something new, but don't ask me to kill five of something when I had to kill a dozen of them to get here to get the quest to kill five. It's just... rude."

Sidequests are intended to give the player a break from the main quest, Level Grinding, or both. This is especially common in MMORPGs to give the player an alternative to simple, mindless grinding. So what better way to do that than give them a quest that... is simple, mindless grinding?

A Monster Slaughter Sidequest is a quest to kill a certain number of a given monster or monsters. Why any monsters of these types didn't count as kills before the quest is rarely addressed. Nor usually is how the quest giver knows how many you've killed (or why they care).

Despite the name, this does not necessarily have to be a Sidequest. This may be required for the progression of the main game itself. This type of quest is often a type of Fake Longevity.

This quest can be combined with Twenty Bear Asses, either as part of the same quest or occurring in the same game. These are sometimes also called "Pokémon Missions": Gotta Catch Them All!

Supertrope to Rat Stomp, one of the most common starting quests of this type in Western RPGs.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Action Adventure 

    Eastern RPG 
  • In Final Fantasy X, the Monster Arena gives you a quest to capture 10 of each unique monster in each area. Doing so unlocks the ultimate Bonus Boss at the arena, but the player is also rewarded along the way as they reach milestones in the collection such as capturing every monster in each individual area/dungeon or every monster of the same species.
  • In Final Fantasy XII you can only complete the Clan Primer by killing a certain number of every single enemy in the game.
    • A better example would be the chain mechanic by which players must kill a certain number of a race to increase the chances of better drops. One example is a rare mark (bombshell) and it drops the yagyu darkblades needed to deal with Yiazmat, but it's pretty much not going to drop them until you get a high enough chain.
  • Similarly in Rogue Galaxy, you have to kill a certain number of almost every enemy to get a particular achievement/prize/what have you.
  • One of the troubles you can take on at the Trouble Center in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door is "Roust These Cads!", in which you are expected to fight all the enemies in the Boggly Woods for a reward of 20 coins (plus drops and Star Points).
    • However by the time you get this quest you can have the First-Attack Badge (if you attack a monster in the overworld that would no longer give experience, it dies without entering a battle) and even the Bump-Attack Badge (kills enemies if you even TOUCH a monster that would no longer give experience, it dies). This also one of the earliest areas so its possible to complete this mission by just walking down the path.
  • If you want to progress through the plot of Agarest Senki 2, you'll need to do this trope.
  • Atelier Iris 3 has one of these as one of the last sidequests available.
  • Villager Irina's quests in Castlevania: Order of Ecclesia consist of this. The first one has you kill thirty crows, of which you usually can't find more than five or six in any given screen. The others, which give tougher enemies to kill, have smaller numbers.
  • The Ecology Quests in Romancing SaGa, you have to kill all the monsters that preys on the monster population you are trying to boost. (Kill birds to increase fish population, kill bugs to raise plant population, etc)
  • One late game quest in Etrian Odyssey IV: Legends of the Titan involve killing a bunch of foes in a particular dungeon. The problem is that only the monster that's currently being asked for counts - you can't get ahead by killing a bunch of a different monster for later. And if the monster in question isn't spawning via the Random Number God, you're in for a long slog, even if you can easily dispatch all of the monsters in question.
  • Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII takes this to it's logical extreme. Most Canvas of Souls quests require a set number of items to complete, most being Vendor Trash dropped by monsters, however two quest givers require you kill an entire species, and one person asks that you kill every single monster in the world.

    Freeware Games 
  • Progress Quest has multiple quests along the lines of "Eradictate the Elves", "Murder the Pink Elephants" and "Neutralize the Motorbike Goblins".

    Massively Multiplayer Online Game 
  • The most common quest bar none in La Tale. Annoyingly, quests to kill X Monster A always comes before the Twenty Bear Asses quest for Monster A. That is, after you've sold the Vendor Trash you're supposed to collect.
  • Extremely common in Grand Fantasia as a sidequest.
  • Kingdom of Loathing: the Bounty Hunter Hunter exists to give out quests of this type. You can choose one of three quests every day, all of which are "go kill X of this monster." Somewhat of a parody, since giving out these quests is literally his job despite it being pointless, but it's still tedious. See Twenty Bear Asses for more...much more.
  • Runescape players who slay enough chompy birds with a special luring technique will be rewarded with fancy hats.
    • The entire Slayer skill is this trope; players visit a Slayer Master who tells them to kill x number of y creatures.
  • MapleStory. Either you're committing genocide on the order of hundreds of creatures a quest, or you're collecting random drops at the same rate.
    • One line of quests orders you to kill 999 of a rather powerful mook for the sole purpose of proving your strength. And if you don't finish this quest, you are blocked off from the rest of the area by a mandatory Door To Before. And then you have to kill 999 of the next mook, and the next... By the way, these mooks in question are monks in a temple.
  • World of Warcraft: Guaranteed to take up large amounts of your game experience.
    • The most famous questgiver for such missions is the Ernest Hemingway analogue Hemet Nesingwary, who would instruct players to slaughter dozens of animals for sport in Stranglethorn Vale, Nagrand, and Scholazar Basin. In Wrath of the Lich King, a questline was added in which the player aids a rival organization, "Druids for the Humane and Ethical Treatment of Animals"...who would instruct players to slaughter dozens of hunters as revenge.
    • Cataclysm added the quests "Once More With Eeling" and "Do the World a Favor", where you take it upon yourself to kill specific animals simply because they're gross you don't like them. Driving the parody home, the in-game quest checklist lists progress with the phrases "7/10 Disgusting Eels Justifiably Slain" and "4/12 Mangy Hyenas Eradicated" respectively.
    • Then there is "Proving Your Strength" from the Darkmoon Faire, which requires you to collect 250 trophies, though you can kill whatever you like for them.
  • Dofus has these.
  • Ace Online has monster hunting sidequests in their own folder (with some overlap with Twenty Bear Asses).
  • This one's also common in AdventureQuest Worlds, though AE does try to make the quests fit the general storyline of a quest chain.
  • Killing X amount of monsters with a specific technique in order to unlock certain skills or get achievements is as close as Vindictus gets to the trope — the main quests mainly have you focusing on clearing dungeons and instances, which pretty much entails killing everything.
  • The bulk of Quest Content in TERA for quests consists of slaughtering various numbers of Monster X, and sometimes Monster Y and Z as well. Also slips into Twenty Bear Asses (Though the game tends to be merciful on the numbers and drops). As well, the game allows you to do repeatable missions to kill Monster X after turning in the original quest.
  • Dungeons & Dragons Online works similarly to Vindictus in that the main focus of quests is clearing out dungeon instances instead of "kill X amount of monsters then return to me," though there are some situations that qualify:
    • There's the Slayer bonus, which gives you XP for killing X amount of enemies in a wilderness instance.
    • Certain dungeon quests, such as Butcher's Path, will also have you killing X amount of monsters as one of your objectives on the quest, either as a main objective, or as an optional objective for extra XP.
    • This gets Lampshaded in the quest "frame work" where the sidequests are
    • Slay some minotaurs - 10 total
    • Slay more minotaurs - 10 total
    • Slay some more minotaurs (still 10 total, although they stop listing that
    • Slay even more minotaurs
    • Slay, you guessed it, more minotaurs
    • Keep slaying minotaurs
    • The slaughter of minotaurs must go on
    • Don't stop killing minotaurs now
    • Finish what you started with the minotaurs -
    • Kill something other than a minotaur for a change
  • This and Twenty Bear Asses are the most common mission types in Wizard 101.
  • Perfect World is no exception from this. Features these that are repeatable within a certain level range. May even overlap with other (side/)quests ie. killing a criteria mob will tick one kill to all currently active quests requiring a kill count of that mob.
  • Although later content tends to move away from this, these still crop up in City of Heroes. They're usually in older story arcs, and dressed as your character beating a lead out of them on the whereabouts of a certain villain or plot. Generally speaking, the improvement is that newer content now longer sends the character to defeat ten enemies far too strong for him in a distant zone far too dangerous for him. The classic example from the older game was being sent to defeat Circle of Thorns enemies in the twisted and deadly Perez Park.
  • In Champions Online, this pops up a couple times in Canada - you're given 3 separate missions requiring taking down 150 enemies of a given faction - Justiciar gives Terror Halt (150 Hunter-Patriots), and both Douglas McKenzie and Mark Derringer give missions to take out 150 Viper Agents (Snake Harmer and Make Snakes Moan).
  • To the letter in The Old Republic: most quests are not about killing masses of quest enemies, but they generally have a bonus quest attached to them that unlocks once you kill one of the associated monsters. (Sometimes this swings back to normal objectives: one common chain of bonus quests is Kill Enemies -> Sabotage Doodads -> Kill and Loot a Heroid Enemy -> Turn In Item)

    Platform Game 

    Real Time Strategy 
  • A number of Achievements for Sins of a Solar Empire require you to destroy so many of a certain unit type in a single match. The 1000 Pirates and 2500 strikecraft ones are particularly tedious.

    Western RPG 
  • The Elder Scrolls likes to do this from time to time.
  • Gothic often finds some rather creative justifications for this type of missions.
  • Fallout: New Vegas has kill challenges, which tally your kills of certain categories and awards you special perks if you kill enough - kill enough bugs and you get the Bug Stomper perk, and so on. It also has the "Lord Death", "Lord Death of Murder Mountain" and "Apocalypse Ain't Got Nothing On Me" challenges, which requires you to kill, well, anything you can find. And requiring 200, 700 and 1000 kills respectively. In other words, you need to kill 1900 opponents to fill your death quota.
  • In Mass Effect 1, there's an overly long sidequest that involves you wiping out what pretty much amounts to a geth army. While there is no specific number you have to kill, you have to wipe them out on five different worlds. This will take at least an hour, probably double that if you explore each planet looking for stuff.
  • The Lord of the Rings:The Return of the King tallies not only how many enemies you kill but if you properly execute the controls while doing it. It determines your mission rating. Luckily there's plenty of sites that list a manual cheat code to make all your mission ratings Perfect.


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