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Jump Jet Pack

A device that helps propel its user forward, backward, etc. quickly. Unlike a Jet Pack, it doesn't grant flight, but it can help jumping In a Single Bound, Double Jump, and hovering in the air temporarily. Also, it helps in a Dash Attack or Video Game Dashing.

Sub-Trope of Jet Pack.

Examples

Anime and Manga

Literature
  • Robert A. Heinlein's Starship Troopers: the powered armor used by the Mobile Infantry had "jump jets" that acted like this. When a trooper tried to jump high his suit automatically cut in the jets to send him high into the air, then cut in again to allow a soft landing.

Live-Action TV
  • In an episode of Alias, Sidney uses a thruster pack attached to a creeper (a board with wheels, like an auto mechanic uses) in order to escape quickly after conducting some sabotage on a rocket about to ignite.

Tabletop Games
  • Warhammer 40,000 has Jump Packs, which Space Marines of every sort can use, which propel them airborne with a thrust and can also slow down an otherwise very harsh landing if they get dropped from sub-orbit. Jet pack infantry (primarily Tau battlesuits, but there are a few similar units in other armies) don't move any faster than regular infantry (though they can still jump over obstacles), but may instead use their jetpacks to manouver in the assualt phase, so they may for example jump up from behind terrain, fire their weapons and then jump back out of enemy line of sight.
  • Standard equipment available to armored and unarmored infantry as well as the humongous mecha of the setting in BattleTech; BattleMech "jump jets" are usually an integral part of the design, but can be pod-mounted on OmniMech frames, and oversized limited-use external jump packs (typically used for a quick drop from an airborne carrier, then discarded after touching ground) are likewise available. Jump jets also exist for conventional vehicles — the iconic example being the Star League's (in)famous Kanga hovertank —, but never really entered mass production; the landings tend to be too rough on the suspension.

Video Games
  • MEC Troopers from the XCOM: Enemy Unknown expansion can be upgraded with Jetboots that let them jump to higher terrain.
  • Automated Simulations' Star Warrior, which was based on Starship Troopers. The player character's power armor had a Jump subsystem that allowed him to jump 10 spaces forward, regardless of the terrain (you jumped over it).
  • The Booster 2.0 from Cave Story is a prime example. When equipped, you can boost in four different directions. In fact, it's necessary to have this item not only to get past two different dungeons, you unlock the two dungeons by having it.
  • In Mischief Makers, Marina's gynoid body includes thruster jets, activated by double-tapping the D-pad or pressing one of the C-buttons to boost herself in the direction specified. This can be done repeatedly, but the cooldown between bursts is enough that she still slowly loses altitude when dashing horizontally in mid-air, and boosting vertically lets her effectively hover but not ascend.
  • In Metroid Prime, the Space Jump is enabled by a set of boosters attached to the boots of the power suit. The 2D games in the series tend to have it as something much more substantial.
  • Reapers in Starcraft II can jump up and down cliffs with their jet packs.
  • Dawn of War. Assault Marines, Chaos Raptors, Ork Stormboyz, Tau Stealthsuits and Crisis suits, and the Sisters of Battle's Seraphim all use jump packs, with Raptors and Stormboyz having an upgrade that makes them move faster for a while.
  • Players on foot in Titanfall have one that lets them jump higher and run on walls.
  • Half-Life: The HEV Suit has a long jump module that's effectively a big rocket attached to Gordon's back for crossing gaps his normal jump had no hope of reaching. Not used very much in the game and abandoned in the sequel.
  • In the Rocket Knight Adventures video game series, this is Sparkster's jet pack's primary function. Only in a select number of levels does it grant real flight.
  • Cloudberry Kingdom's jetpack works as a boost to your jump instead of instantly providing lift. It can allow for flight but in practise only functions as a super jump instead of hovering.
  • The Super Rush Adapter from Mega Man 7 gives Mega Man - among other things - a pair of jet thrusters on his back. However, it doesn't grant him flight like Mega Man 6 did. Instead, it grants him the ability to do a Double Jump.
  • FLUDD's Rocket Nozzle in Super Mario Sunshine. Possibly the Turbo one for a horizontal equivalent.
  • In Low G Man, the title character's backpack allows him to jump higher, though it's powered by anti-gravity Applied Phlebotinum rather than jet engines.
  • In Halo, humans and Brutes both get these, with the former having them since Halo 3, and the latter getting them in installments from Halo: Reach onward.
  • Exosuits in Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare get these, both for high jumps and slowed descents.
  • Jumpjets in the MechWarrior series will rocket your Humongous Mecha into the air but generally have limited fuel. In Mechwarrior 2, thrusters could be vectored in any direction, allowing players to "ski" across the ground. 4 launched the user into a slow unguided arc and was generally used for sniping from behind cover. Living Legends has two variants for mechs which offer either superb vertical or horizontal acceleration (both of which have Camera Abuse and Over Heating issues), along with a jump pack for its Powered Armor which can be used for crazy maneuvers in low-grav environments
  • Imperial Dark Troopers in Star Wars Battlefront use these for mobility. They don't provide actual flight like with their predecessors, the Republic's Jet Troopers, but they're much faster and can be used to give a lateral speed boost, as well.

Western Animation
  • Transformers Animated: Prowl had jump jetpacks initially before getting samurai armor that included a jet pack.

Real Life
  • During the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, big balloons worn on backpack-like straps were available as stunt devices, allowing very high jumps but not negating the entire weight of the wearer. Since then, jetpacks replaced them as stunt devices; neither them nor those were ever really practical.