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Hero Does Public Service
Detective Kevin Ryan: Your alibi checked out.
Detective Tom Demming: Thank you.
Ryan: (to Castle et al.) He really was coaching an underprivileged youth basketball league.
Demming: Well, for what it's worth, my kids won that night.
— "Den of Thieves", Castle

You know them well. They're people with public service at heart. When they aren't saving the world from evil aliens trying to tear a hole in the space-time continuum, they're helping old Mrs. Reed weed her garden. Their humility is admirable, and they are a lesson for us all.

This can apply to mundane heroes such as police officers just as easily as it can to superheroes. Coaching kids' sports leagues is a very common choice for the extracurricular activity, since it lets them show off their athleticism while at the same time doing good in the community.

This activity often serves as a plot hook if whomever they're helping by this activity then becomes involved in something pertaining to the hero's day job. For example, cop shows often have the protagonist helping community centers and so forth in poor neighborhoods, and the kids they help often end up entangled with gangs from which the hero must extricate them.

Expect a Small Steps Hero to do this often, as well as The Paragon. Beware of Holding Out for a Hero, though, when the citizens become complacent.

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Comic Books 
  • One Marvel Comics anti-smoking miniseries opened with Luke Cage coaching a high school track team (with Peter Parker covering it for the Daily Bugle). The plot (something to do with organized crime and illegal casinos) gets kicked off when he investigates why his star player, Brett, is suddenly not doing so hot.
  • Superman is known for this. What makes him special amongst the superhero ranks is that no job is too big or too small for him. One day, he's halfway across the galaxy fighting a universal threat. The next, he's reading books to orphans or planting gardens.
  • In New Avengers the Avengers take time in between adventures with cosmic level threats to stand on street corners in bad neighborhoods to help make people feel more secure and let small-time crooks know they're not below them.
  • She-Hulk:
    • In the Avengers story arc "The Search for She-Hulk" Shulkie is eventually found helping repair a community devastated by one of her cousin's rampages.
    • In another story, Jen Walters volunteers with Green Cross (an organization devoted to helping victims of the Hulk's actions) to clean up the town that she herself trashed during one of her own rampages. Initially, she works incognito, but ultimately comes out as She-Hulk to expose a woman who's trying to use She-Hulk's actions to cover up her murdering her husband.
  • In Kick-Ass 2, many of the heroes that Dave encounters do what essentially amounts to community service. One superheroine, for instance, devotes her efforts to making sure that young women in her area get home safely at night.
  • In Batman Incorporated, Man-of-Bats is a doctor in his civilian identity who, in his very limited spare time, also does pro bono work and tries to battle alcoholism.

    Fan Works 
  • Red Fire, Red Planet: One infodump mentions that Brokosh, C.O. of the IKS mupwI', started a sort of community center in one of the slums on the fringes of First City on Qo'noS with two other KDF-aligned Lethean mercenaries and a Romulan Republic officer named Makus. Unfortunately he also doesn't think it'll do a whole lot of good without some help from the Klingon High Council.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Blue Bloods:
    • When Mayor Carter Poole takes office, he reveals to Frank Reagan that he wants to keep him on as police commissioner partly because, back when he was a kid, there was this white Irish beat cop who coached his basketball team.
    • In season four's "Growing Boys" Jamie is likewise shown coaching basketball in a poor neighborhood. He gets involved in the plot when two gangsters start pressuring one of his players to rejoin the gang and one of them is inadvertently hit by a car when Jamie goes after them.
  • Exploited in the Castle episode "Den of Thieves". Tom Demming, a detective from Robbery, is briefly suspected by Beckett, Castle, et al. to be the Killer of the Week. Demming alibis out on account of he was coaching an underprivileged youth basketball league at the time of the murder.
  • In Adam-12, Pete Malloy is shown coaching kids' basketball in one episode. It turns into Pete and Jim trying to help a drug-addicted player before it's too late. The kid's brother gets into the guy's stash and dies.
  • In one Christmas Episode of NCIS: Los Angeles Kensi is at loose ends Christmas Eve, so Deeks brings her along on his "date", which is serving meals at a food bank.
  • Parodied in the Sirens episode "A Bitch Named Karma", where the guys are sent to teach kids CPR, but try to speed their way through it, because they've scored tickets to a game on the same day.

    Western Animation 
  • The Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes episode "Molehattan" finds Reed, Susan, and Johnny playfully using their powers for the amusement of a kid soccer team until Ben turns up to coach them.

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