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Big Heroic Run
The hero or heroes run very fast to save someone, fight someone, deliver critical information, or other reasons. Often scored with a Theme Music Power-Up.

See also Bring News Back, Meadow Run, Race for Your Love. Contrast with Power Walk.
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    Anime and Manga 
  • Neon Genesis Evangelion: The three EVA units have to make a run to catch the angel Sahaquiel on its orbital drop.
  • In Sword of the Stranger, Nanashi has to run cross-country to find and save Kotaro.
  • In Fairy Tail, Natsu has to run to catch Lucy before she hits the ground after she falls off a very tall tower.
  • In a famous sequence from Millennium Actress, Chiyoko runs after information on her beloved artist; the time period and Chiyoko's garb change several times along the way.

    Fan Fic 
  • Happens during Chapter 22 of Daughter of the Sun, when Skypaw's trying to call reinforcements for ThunderClan when they're going to battle WindClan. She makes a Big Heroic Run to ThunderClan camp—although she's interrupted by Chasefire trying to fight her. Then, Skypaw's Clanmates find her and they all make a Big Heroic Run together to reach the ThunderClan-WindClan border.

    Film 
  • Chariots of Fire: Naturally.
  • The Lord of the Rings: When Boromir is attacked by the Uruk-Hai at Amon Hen, he runs from them and blows the Horn of Gondor, causing Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimli to all run toward him.
  • Star Trek: Chekov is the only one who can operate the transporter well enough to save Kirk and Sulu when they fall off Nero's drill, so he runs through the Enterprise, shouting "I can do that!" at the top of his lungs.
    • In Star Trek Into Darkness Kirk and Scotty run through the Enterprise's corridors to reach the warp core as the ship's gravity fluctuates and debris crashes around them.
  • Serenity:
    River: You take care of me, Simon. You've always taken care of me. My turn.
  • The end of The Graduate involves a lot of running.
  • This is often the prelude to the climax of Kamen Rider movies, like in Kamen Rider Den-O: Ore, Tanjou! and Final Countdown (5 and 7 Riders, respectively) and Kamen Rider Decade: All Riders vs. Great Shocker (24, since the title said All note  Riders).
  • In the beginning of Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger, all the Super Sentai teams of the past 35 years charge towards the invading Zangyack Empire. There are 182 heroes present in that run.
  • Run, Lola, Run.
  • There was a Sin City one-shot in which Marv successfully runs after escaping mooks in a car and hops on. A roller-blade variation occurs in Family Values in which Miho skates after a speeding car.
  • In Stardust, Tristan outright sprints all the way to the Wall when he finds out Yvaine will die if she crosses the wall.
  • In Batman: The Movie, the caped crusader tries to get rid of a lit bomb, but cannot find a place to discard it that doesn't endanger someone, causing him to run throughout the city trying to find a safe detonation zone. Some days, you just can't get rid of a bomb.
  • In L: change the WorLd, L attempts one when he realizes Maki is gone, but is too late to reach her.
  • The last few minutes of the WWII POW escape movie Von Ryan's Express has the titular 'von' Ryan (actually a discipline-minded U.S. Army Air Force officer) running along the train tracks as the train he and his fellow prisoners hijacked trundles towards Switzerland and safety. Ryan doesn't make it.
  • A particularly awesome example during the climax of Mission Impossible III, when Ethan (Tom Cruise) needs to sprint about 16 blocks to save his wife. No stunts or SFX, just several straight minutes of Cruise flooring it at stunning speeds down busy streets and across rooftops on his own.
  • Captain America: The First Avenger What is the very first thing Steve Rogers does as the perfect human specimen? Chase down a speeding car, of course. While barefoot.
  • In A Hard Day's Night, The Beatles do one when they have to rush to the police station and save Ringo before their concert starts. It's set to an epic reprise of "Can't Buy Me Love."
  • Running is one of Forrest Gump's key abilities. This makes him a football hero and then a war hero.

    Literature 
  • A The Lord of the Rings example: Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimli running after the orcs to save Merry and Pippin.
  • The Horse and His Boy has one of these (albeit on horseback) as a major plot thread. The evil army is coming and the good guys must be warned in time.
  • The bear running to where his hat is at the end of I Want My Hat Back.
  • Lucinda Wyman's epic skate across most of Manhattan to reach her uncle in Roller Skates by Ruth Sawyer.
  • Ryan Ellis has one of these in Big Fat Disaster by Beth Fehlbaum.
  • In Anna Sewell's Black Beauty, the main character has two: one a round trip to fetch a doctor, and one a chase after a runaway horse.

    Live Action TV 
  • Doctor Who: Many examples. Starting from Three — but especially Four — the Doctor does an awful lot of running.
    • The Tenth Doctor runs all the way across the Library and down to the core of the world to save River Song.
    • The Eleventh Doctor tries to run across Upper Leadworth in "Amy's Choice", but the Dream Lord makes him fall asleep.
  • Battlestar Galactica: Starbuck runs from her Viper to the airlock to stop Apollo from killing the Final Four, who have found the way to Earth.
  • Subverted twice in the original Firefly pilot. Simon has just been told by Mal that Kaylee has died (meaning he's failed to save her after he let her get shot), and he takes off at a dead run to the infirmary. When he gets there, instead of a dead Kaylee, he finds her alive and giggling at something Book's just said. Simon angrily calls Mal "psychotic". Irony cut to Mal, Zoe, Jayne, and Wash on the bridge, laughing their asses off at the prank and Wash calling Mal "psychotic".
  • In Torchwood, there are two chase scenes in the same episode, between the prime witness in an investigation into a strange alien artifact and first Gwen then Owen. Gwen nearly gets him the first time, getting his hoodie and the artifact, and Owen corners him after a chase through several gardens. The second chase scene is on youtube.
  • Used in the season 2 finale of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, when Buffy realises that she's been chasing a Red Herring and takes off running at full clip... and the fact that she's still too late to save Kendra is underscored by the camera slamming into slow motion as she gets back to the school.
  • In RedDwarf, the episode Out of Time ends with Lister, Cat and Kryten all killed by their own corrupted future selves. With only a minute left before Starbug breaks apart completely and only Kryten's last words ("There may be a...") to hold onto, Rimmer snatches up a bazookoid and charges into the rapidly disintegrating engine room, even taking a support beam landing on him, just so he can destroy the time machine that caused all this in some faint hope he can save everyone.
  • Happens frequently in The Bionic Woman (always in slow motion), once while she wore a nun's habit.
  • Also happens frequently in The Six Million Dollar Man, also always in slow motion.

    Video Games 
  • A recurring element in the Mass Effect series:
    • Mass Effect 1 has the escape from the buried Prothean tower after rescuing Liara T'Soni. Made epic by the fact that it is collapsing at the moment—due to an ongoing earthquake.
    • Mass Effect 2 ends with Shepard and Co.'s escape from the Collector Base, whose epicness relies on multiple factors, from the Big Bad's monologue, though awesome soundtrack, to the fact that the whole damn place is about to go supernova.
    • And subverted in Mass Effect 3. At the climax of the final battle on Earth, Shepard, their squad, and an army of Systems Alliance troops make a mad dash for the teleporter beam that will lead them to the Citadel, through the magnificently destroyed streets of London, under fire from Reaper capital ships. They're all slaughtered, except Shepard, who is "merely" Only Mostly Dead.
  • Happens in Ōkami once in awhile, which is always accompanied by this song.
  • In the iPhone app Zombies Run, you - yes, you - have to do this. And we don't mean virtually, either; the app is a cross between a fitness app, a game, and a radio play so you have to run in Real Life to further the plot and complete your mission.

    Western Animation 
  • Pocahontas pulls off one with lots of symbolism.
  • The Venture Bros. has one after Brock watches Molotov Cocktease fall off a cliff and has to get back to the Venture compound before the family gets killed by her elite Blackhearts assassins.
  • Batman does this in the intro to Batman: The Brave and the Bold. It must have been pretty heroic because when The Joker took over for an episode, he rode on a pogo stick during those parts.
  • In the Justice League Unlimited season two finale, Wally West's run around the goddamn planet to build up enough momentum to punch through the merged Luthor-Brainiac being's armor. Bonus points for doing it multiple times and being nearly permanently sucked into the Speed Force as a result.
    • For the math geeks: he runs around the planet 9 times (though he only delivers 8 hits) in 42 seconds, averaging at about 4.9 million km/h. That's about 3 million mph for Americans and around 46 times faster than Earth's orbital speed.

    Real Life 
  • The most famous Big Heroic Run is the original Marathon run. Pheidippides's mission to gain Spartan help for the Battle of Marathon failed, because the Spartans refused to help the Athenians in time. But he managed to get all the way to Sparta and back to Athens in time to warn the Athenians they'd get no help and to participate in the battle himself. The tale that he fell dead after delivering his message was a later garbling of the story.

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