troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Literature: Tales of the Bounty Hunters
Clockwise from upper left, Boba Fett, Dengar, Zuckuss, Bossk, and 4-LOM. IG-88 is on the side cover.
"Bounty hunters. We don't need their scum."
Admiral Firmus Piett, Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back

Remember that line-up of mercenaries gathered by Darth Vader to hunt down the Millennium Falcon halfway through Episode V? If so, then this is the book for you. An anthology of short stories written by several science fiction authors for the Star Wars Adventure Journal, this book is part of a series which includes Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina and Tales from Jabba's Palace that aims to provide background stories for minor characters appearing in each of the three original films.

Edited by Kevin J. Anderson, who also wrote the Jedi Academy Trilogy and the Tales of the Jedi comics. The stories are often considered to range from great ("Payback") to not so great ("Therefore I Am") to some of the best EU material ever (seriously, read "The Last One Standing"), with some mediocre ones in between. It's worth noting that the stories of Dengar and Bossk provide important background material for the subsequent Bounty Hunter Wars trilogy, and likewise for being the first effort to flesh out the backstory of Boba Fett.

This work provides examples of:

  • A Day in the Limelight: For the Episode V bounty hunters.
  • A.I. Is a Crapshoot: IG-88
  • Anti-Villain: Dengar hunts Han Solo ruthlessly and is keen to see him dead, but he has a reason and is portrayed as a deeply disturbed and lonely person who becomes less brutal as he realises he can live for something other than his revenge.
  • Badass Normal: Dengar and Boba Fett, who are both normal humans (by the standards of the Star Wars universe, anyway) but are regarded as two of the best bounty hunters in the Empire.
  • Cloning Body Parts: Mentioned to be possible but illegal in "Of Possible Futures". Zuckuss' lungs were injured when he and 4-LOM were taking down a target, and they're trying to raise money to get him clone replacements (since they're illegal, they're very expensive). The Rebels reveal they've discovered a way to get the injured tissue to regrow in place without requiring cloning.
  • Contagious A.I.: IG-88, who uploads his consciousness into three identical droids and the Death Star.
  • Continuity Snarl: 4-LOM the Jedi droid subverts this because he only fantasizes about being a Jedi. Bounty Hunter Wars reveals he later suffered partial memory loss due to battle damage, pushing the Reset Button on his Character Development.
  • Cybernetics Eat Your Soul: Quite literally in the case of Dengar, but he eventually gets better.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: In "The Last One Standing", after Jabba captures Leia he gives her to Fett as an, ahem, present. Fett is disgusted by this but doesn't want to insult Jabba by sending her back, so he tells Leia he won't touch her because premarital sex and rape are immoral, and takes the couch. He also goes off on a rant about hating Han because he smuggled spice and Drugs Are Bad (paraphrased). Leia calls him on the rant's hypocrisy, since he is a professional killer, after all, but he points out what he does is legal and believes they deserve it, even saying the destruction of her entire planet was a just act, since "they rebelled." She doesn't press this. See also the Fridge tab.
  • External Retcon: This was one of the first EU novels to give Boba Fett a backstory. As we now know, his status as a former Journeyman Protector named Jaster Mereel was actually just one of his aliases.
  • Gambit Pileup: Good heavens, Endor. In addition to Palpatine baiting the Rebels into attacking the Death Star II construction site and the Rebels attempting to counter, IG-88 uploads himself into the DS2's computer core to take it over and even improves the superlaser's accuracy during the battle.
  • Humiliation Conga: Bossk, and oh does he deserve it. After repeatedly attempting to double-cross his bounty-hunting partners, he gets double-crossed by them in turn and locked in an electrified holding cell on his ship used to restrain his own prisoners. But that's not all: he is also arrested and handed over to an Imperial governor who decides to skin Bossk to make a reptile coat for his wife to wear. Not to mention that getting skinned is the ultimate dishonor in Trandoshan society, since it causes the Scorekeeper (a bloodthirsty goddess worshiped by the Trandoshans) to nullify all the points on a worshiper's "score", all but guaranteeing that they'll be sent to Hell. Bossk eventually escapes before he can be skinned, but we don't see him again until Shadows of the Empire.
  • Inertial Dampening: The IG-88 leaves the inertial dampers on its ship turned completely off, because it's a droid and therefore is not subject to acceleration-related injuries like us meatbags.
  • Na´ve Newcomer: Zuckuss.
  • Nom de Guerre: Dengar's nickname "Payback" gives his story its title.
  • The Only One Allowed to Defeat You: Dengar feels this way about Han Solo, whom he holds responsible for the racing accident that left him brain damaged and ended his career as a swoop racer.
  • The Power of Love: Manaroo's love helps to restore Dengar's emotions in the end.
  • Turned Against Their Masters: IG-88 programs thousands of droids with a command to betray their masters at his signal. He never gets the chance.
  • Psycho for Hire: Bossk really fits the bill.
  • Reptiles Are Abhorrent: Bossk is a Trandoshan slaver who keeps Wookiee pelts.
  • Robot War: IG-88 wants to start one of these but he's killed before he can.
  • Spiritual Successor: The Bounty Hunter Wars continues some of the sub-plots included in this book, including Dengar rescuing Fett from the desert after he escaped the Sarlacc and Bossk's plots to take control of the Bounty Hunters Guild from his father.
  • The Stoic: Dengar, who can't actually feel any emotions beyond anger, hatred and rarely, hope, as a result of Imperial experimentation. Although he gets better in the end.
  • There Is No Kill Like Overkill: Dengar kills an evil Imperial official by shoving an active thermal detonator into his mouth, pushing him off a cliff and shooting him on the way down.
  • Third-Person Person: Mentioned in Zuckuss' story. His species, the Gand, refer to themselves exclusively by their family name and have to work their way up to the point where they allowed to use their given name, which only happens when they're famous enough that most people would automatically know who's being referenced. Zuckuss doesn't feel constrained by this tradition and uses his given name despite having not "earned" it. (This causes fellow Gands to view him as insane in other stories.)

Tales from the Mos Eisley CantinaRecap/Star Wars Expanded UniverseTales from Jabba's Palace
Tales of KolmarLiterature of the 1990sTales of the Branion Realm
Tales from the Mos Eisley CantinaScience Fiction LiteratureThe Thrawn Trilogy

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
16408
42