Literature: For Your Eyes Only

The eighth James Bond book by Ian Fleming, and the first one to be a collection of short stories. Published in 1960.

  1. "From a View to a Kill": Bond is tasked to aid in an investigation involving murder of a courier and the theft of the important papers he was carrying.
  2. "For Your Eyes Only": When close friends of M are murdered by gangsters, he sends Bond after them.
  3. "Quantum of Solace": At the party of a Jamaican governor, Bond is told a story of a failed marriage.
  4. "Risico": After he is sent to mission in Italy to sabotage the local drugtrade, Bond is caught between two feuding crimebosses.
  5. "The Hildebrand Rarity": After investigating possible Communist activity in Seychelles, Bond uses his remaining free time to join an expedition to find a specimen of the rare eponymous fish.

The second and the fourth story were turned into the twelth James Bond film. Only the names of the first and the third story made their way to the films fourteen and twenty-two, and elements of the last one were implemented to the sixteenth.

"From a View to a Kill"

  • Beneath Notice: M thinks that perhaps the enemy has disguised himself as a gardener or garbage man or such. Someone hidden in plain sight.
  • Distressed Dude: Bond's life is saved by the Girl of the Week!
  • Dressing as the Enemy: The (possible) GRU agents' operation hinges on one of them tricking other couriers by dressing as them. Bond uses this tactic against the spies by dressing as the fake-courier and luring them out of their hideout.

"For Your Eyes Only"

  • The Chains of Commanding: Before M briefs Bond on his mission, he laments about responsibilities he has to hold in his position, as he is unsure about sending one of his men to enact personal revenge on his behalf.
  • Sue Donym: Bond, under the name 'Mr. James', meets a contact in Canada who introduces himself as 'Colonel Johns'.
  • Those Wacky Nazis: von Hammerstein, now a landbuyer with strongarm tactics, was a Nazi officer in the second World War.
  • Title Drop: The title appears written on a folder handed to Bond.

"Quantum of Solace"

  • Chekhov's Gunman: The wife of the Canadian millionaire Bond met briefly at the start of the story is revealed to be the unfaithful wife Rhoda at the end.
  • Cuckold: After growing bored with her meek husband, Rhoda started a scandalous relationship with the island's most sought after bachelor.
  • Dolled-Up Installment: The story just started with the tale of the marriage, but Fleming put a framing device of Bond being told the story at a cocktail party so he could put it in this collection.
  • Sexy Stewardess: Struggling to come up with something say at the party, Bond blurts out that he was ever going to marry someone, it'd be stewardess.


  • Dead Foot Leadfoot: Bond shoots Kristatos as he's making his getaway after his operation is destroyed... with the Lancia's wheels in the road ruts guiding it and his dead foot on the gas pedal, the car hurtles out of sight into the distance.
  • Dirty Communists: Bond learns that the drug operation he just destroyed was a Soviet ploy against Great Britain.
  • Generic Ethnic Crime Gang: Kristatos' (Albanian) and Colombo's (Greek) gangs.
  • Harpoon Gun: Bond is greeted by a dozen men carrying harpoon guns after his meeting with Lisl.

"The Hildebrand Rarity"

  • Asshole Victim: There is nothing nice about Milton Krest, as he looks down on non-American nationalities, treats his wife like dirt and his expeditions for the Smithsonian are just a ploy to avoid paying taxes.
  • Compensating for Something: Bond suspects that Krest's overly macho output is a result of him compensating for his impotence.
  • Cruel and Unusual Death: After hearing his death rattle, Bond finds Krest with the Hildebrand Rarity rammed into his throat.
  • Kick the Dog: Krest poisons an entire river's worth of animals to kill one fish.
  • Mad Lib Thriller Title: The short story marks the only example in Fleming's works of the trope.
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Money!: Krest brags how he is able to bribe his way to obtain the rare specimens for the Smithsonian if he needs to.
  • Whip It Good: Krest punishes his wife for perceived slights on her place in his household by whipping her with a stingray tail.