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  • Heat: With Neil McCauley having Evil Is Cool on his side, Waingro is easily the most hateful, vile, depraved and despicable character in the entire film. He lacks any kind of Evil Virtues or sympathetic qualities, being a petty, sadistic jerkass who is not particularly smart. And for bonus, he's also a Dirty Coward.
  • Titanic:
    • Rose's bastard fiancé, Cal Hockley, played by Billy Zane. We can't hate the iceberg that causes the disaster on the title ship, but we can definitely hate this guy. He disparages the Picasso paintings, he verbally and physically abuses Rose, he tries to have Jack killed, is exposed to care more about money than Rose and finally cons his way onto a lifeboat using a small child to save his pathetic hide. But the karma gods are not mocked: in the aftermath of the disaster, Cal loses the Heart of the Ocean diamond, loses Rose, loses his fortune, and (as mentioned by Rose herself) eventually takes his own life.
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    • Rose's mother Ruth can be easily disliked for trying to break up Rose and Jack's relationship, but because she wants what she believes what is best for her daughter by monetary purposes, her role is minor compared to Cal's. The same can go for the other antagonists (Spicer Lovejoy, the officers, Bruce Ismay, the more uptight first class passengers, some members of Titanic's crew and the stewards holding back the third class passengers).
  • Roland Emmerich gets a lot of mileage out of this trope due to his films typically having nature or non-speaking monsters as their antagonists.
  • Aliens: Paul Reiser's company guy, Carter Burke. The aliens are already scary, so the filmmakers are hedging their bets by offering Burke as the weaselly company guy that only cares about money and fame. He knows about the aliens ahead of time and sends the colonists to investigate. He disagrees with nuking the site from orbit. He tries to impregnate Newt and Ripley with alien embryos with a plan to sabotage and kill the other heroes. Finally he cravenly retreats behind a door locking the other heroes out, where he is deliciously killed by an alien. Clearly, it worked: Paul Reiser said his own mother, who sat next to him at the premiere, cheered at his on-screen death!
  • Similar characters exist in each of the Alien films:
    • Alien has science officer Ash, who turns out to be an android programmed to bring the xenomorph back to Earth no matter what — the crew is expendable.
    • Alien³ has both the prison warden Andrews, who refuses to believe Ripley's claims about the xenomorph even after several prisoners' deaths, and Ax-Crazy inmate Golic, who frees the xenomorph after the other prisoners manage to trap it.
    • Alien: Resurrection has both General Perez, creepy scientist Dr. Gediman, and Mason Wren. Gediman is portrayed by Brad Dourif, who was somewhat typecast as this type of character.
  • As exemplified by Burke from Aliens and Cal in Titanic, James Cameron has a history of these:
    • In the first two Terminator films, the titular machines are far too cool and scary to really hate (not to mention the fact that as machines, they're just doing what they're programmed without the capacity to contemplate their own morality). But you can hate the brusque, cowardly Dr. Silberman, who wasn't that bad in the first movie but has gotten much worse in T2, who's rude and dismissive to Sarah and is largely responsible for her being locked up in an insane asylum for just trying to warn everyone about Skynet, even though he was there when the Terminator attacked the police station. And you can definitely hate the slimy, obnoxious orderly Douglas who not only beats her violently when she tries to resist but also licks her face when she's lying comatose. You'll find it difficult not to cheer when she takes Silberman hostage and then beats the shit out of Douglas with a broken broom.
    • In Avatar, while Colonel Quaritch is the real Big Bad and the one calling all the shots in the RDA's mining operation, and displays a nasty combination of Fantastic Racism and aimless cruelty, he's also tremendously entertaining, charismatic and badass, so it's kind of hard to completely hate him. But you can definitely hate Parker Selfridge, the very definition of a slimy corporate boss who's just as racist as Quaritch but without any of his redeeming qualities. Selfridge mocks the Na'vi as "fleabitten savages" and "blue monkeys" but won't lift a finger to respond to them himself and clearly cares about nothing except the corporate bottom line. His total lack of respect for human life is made evident in a scene where he almost runs over Jake Sully's avatar with a massive mining truck just to prove a point, and unlike Quaritch, who's at least good to his men, Selfridge is nothing but rude and condescending to Grace Augustine and the science team in the most galling of ways. Even his one redeeming quality, when he's visibly horrified by the destruction of Hometree only serves to make him more hateable when it's shown that he strongly disapproves of Quaritch's tactics but is either too greedy or too spineless to do anything about it, despite the fact that he's supposed to be in charge.
  • In Hart's War the Nazi officers running the POW camp are mostly flat characters, except for Colonel Visser, who is exceptionally likable for a Nazi commanding officer due to his Evil Virtues and genuinely polite, open demeanour; Colonel McNamara initially comes off as a flawed individual willing to throw a fellow soldier under a bus for the sake of his mission, but eventually he lets himself be killed for the sake of his men. The falsely accused Lieutenant Scott, his attourney Lieutenant Hart (the titular character) and the prosecutor are all honour-bound men only interested in seeing the truth come to light. Who's to hate? Sergeant Bedford, whose death drives the plot of the movie. Initially shown as a screaming racist, it is eventually revealed that he traded information about his fellow soldiers' assignment for a petty grudge against a fellow prisoner because he was black (like Scott, incidentally) whom he framed and got killed, and was willing to give them a lot more in exchange for the means to escape and save his own hide. Scott says that even though he didn't kill Bedford, he sure wanted to; he was just beaten to the punch. Even the prosecutor says that while he hates Bedford's guts, the law is still the law and it can't be broken.
  • Lincoln, being a historical drama about the passage of the 13th amendment, has no real villain to speak of except for "racism", and even the Confederates are portrayed somewhat sympathetically, wherein it's clear that the Civil War has become so destructive and brutal that all involved are simply desperate to see it end. So who's the audience supposed to hate in this movie? Well, that's where lead Democratic orator Fernando Wood comes in, played by Lee Pace to sneering perfection. As the chief advocate against passage of the Amendment, he's such a slimy, obnoxious, holier-than-thou yuppie that you'd hate him even if he wasn't an avowed white supremacist (as are most of his colleagues, but Wood still stands out as easily the most unpleasant one by far.) Even without the whole "freeing the slaves" thing, the audience would still be invested just to see Wood lose, and his arrogant grandstanding gives Thaddeus Stevens the chance to hurl awesome speeches in Wood's face.
  • Die Hard: The German terrorists/bank robbers have awesome accents and their leader is the perfect villain to love: intelligent, Wicked Cultured, and somewhat considerate to the hostages, but swift and deadly toward the authorities and driven by greed. So who do you hate? Well, perhaps because of just how cool the main antagonists are, the film gives you no less than five Hate Sinks to choose from:
    • Deputy Chief Dwayne Robinson is a massive Jerkass, continually assumes Powell is wrong, distrusts McClane, and generally acts as though he has the Idiot Ball in his pocket at all times. Roger Ebert went so far as to argue that this character alone more or less wrecks the film for him.
    • To a somewhat lesser degree, the two FBI Agents Johnson and Johnson.note  They are rather disrespectful to Powell and even Robinson above, unknowingly play into the robbers' hands by cutting the power, and are perfectly fine with allowing some of the hostages to die if it means getting the villains. They end up getting killed when Hans blows up the roof and their heilcopter is caught in the blast.
    • Paparazzo Richard Thornburg, played by Type Cast William Atherton, who played Walter Peck in Ghostbusters (1984), giving the audience a subconscious reason to hate him. The annoying reporter that ends up exposing who Holly McClane really is by threatening the McClane housekeeper with deportation and terrorizes their kids all for the sake of a story. Possibly the greatest comeuppance example: he gets punched by Holly McClane at the end. He even gets zapped with a stun gun by the same Holly McClane in Die Hard 2 after revealing on international TV that the airport has been hijacked, thereby causing a panic that the authorities were desperately trying to avoid. William Atherton seems to have made a career playing jerks we love to hate. Speaking of which...
  • Ghostbusters
    • Ghostbusters (1984): Walter Peck is made especially obnoxious and slimy so that his entirely reasonable request to check the Ghostbusters' equipment quickly escalates into him rashly shutting down their containment grid and unleashing a literal hell on earth. Granted, Peck is absolutely right about the inadequacy of the containment procedures, but he proves it by breaking them. The fact that his first reaction to a disaster, which he is clearly responsible for bringing about in front of multiple witnesses, is to have the Ghostbusters arrested while totally ignoring his own culpability with such Smug Snake self-righteousness seals the deal securing the audience's hate for him. Presumably being drenched in marshmallow wasn't karma enough for him in the producers' opinion, because he gets possessed by Ivo Shandor in the video game/unofficial third "movie".
    • Ghostbusters II: Jack Hardemeyer makes Peck look NICE by comparison, due to having the 'Busters committed to the psych ward just as Vigo made his big play. He would have gotten himself pulled into the Museum's slime-shell, but this has yet to actually be seen and his comeuppance in the film proper is getting fired from the Mayor's cabinet.
  • Little Shop of Horrors: Despite the situation that Seymour got himself into, we understand that he's doing this out of his love for Audrey, who is the sweetest character in the story. You can't hate the sassy Man-Eating Plant Audrey II because even though it eats blood, it also sings a few interesting songs. However, you can hate Orin Scrivello D.D.S., who abuses Audrey and takes glee in tormenting his patients.
  • Up the wazoo in Tim Burton's films:
    • Beetlejuice. The villain of the title is funny, creative, stylish, and highly susceptible to Draco in Leather Pants — and anyway, he's really just a "bio-exorcist" taking on a job. And we certainly can't hate the heroes of the story: Barbara and Adam Maitland and Lydia Deetz. Even Lydia's self-absorbed stepmother, Delia, is understandable to a certain extent and has undergone a Heel–Face Turn by the end. But we're certainly welcome to hate the snooty New York yuppies Delia wants so desperately to impress, and Betelgeuse gives them exactly what they deserve.
    • Both Batman films.
      • Let's face it, The Joker is quite simply one of the most lovable supervillains in movie history. And Batman himself, while he has quite a few flaws, is ultimately an honorable person and a true hero. But it's okay to hate Carl Grissom for being a Smug Snake and a coward. It's okay to hate Tony Rotelli for being a smartass who's still not smart enough to keep his mouth shut. And it's certainly okay to hate Lieutenant Eckhart because he's a Fat Bastard and an all-around traitor. The two muggers of the film's opening who hit a man over the head and threaten to shoot his son are also particularly loathsome.
      • In Batman Returns, The Penguin and almost all of the other villains are just too funny and cool to hate — yes, even the hypocritical and cowardly Corrupt Corporate Executive who is the film's true baddie. But go right ahead and hate that rapist whom Catwoman righteously kills. Josh, the smarmy image consultant whose nose Penguin nearly bites off, is also a good candidate.
    • Mars Attacks!: The Martians are indisputably the bad guys here, with their constant and unprovoked attacks against humans who just want to be their friends. Problem is, the Martians are so goofy in their evil that it's a lot easier to laugh at them than to hate them. And, truth be told, it's hard not to root for them when their opponents are a seemingly endless stream of pathetic douchebags that include James Dale, the gladhanding and thoroughly insincere President of the United States (though he becomes a better man all too late); Art Land, the sleazy businessman who cares only about making money and completely ignores his wife's drinking problem; Donald Kessler, the pompous and delusional scientist; Jerry Ross, the lecherous and Too Dumb to Live White House press secretary; Nathalie Lake, the extremely superficial TV talk-show hostess; General Decker, a trigger-happy nut par excellence, and General Casey, who considers advancing his career more important than guaranteeing national security... and we can even hate the Norris family, even though they never do anything worse than confining the grandmother of the family to a nursing home and are actually quite sympathetic because they are mourning the death of their eldest son, because they're fat, lazy, right-wing trailer-trash rednecks who make America look bad.
    • Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street: If you don't hate Judge Turpin for sending the main character away to Australia and raping his wife, or you don't hate him for ordering a beating a young man for looking at his hostage, you will certainly hate him for sentencing a crying little boy to death without even knowing if he was guilty by his own admission.
  • Teeth: Brad is abusive to his girlfriend and has openly lusted after his stepsister, Dawn, since childhood. When Dawn's mother is dying a slow and painful death, he leaves her to die to have sex with his girlfriend. When his father finally tries to throw him out, he turns the tables on him with a gun and sics a dog on him. When his father asks if he's upset about his mother, he says he doesn't even remember her and just wants to have sex with Dawn.
  • Twister: Cary Elwes plays the corporate-backed scientist Jonas. You can't rage at the tornadoes, right? They're a force of nature, and they inspire awe in the heroes and give them purpose. But this guy "sold out" and got corporate funding, making him a puppet of The Man (and why would a scientist ever want funding?). His team travel in sleek and sinisterly identical black vans compared to our Ragtag Bunch of Misfits' ragtag assortment of vehicles, and he's a hack that doesn't know the true science and just copies the heroes or relies too much on the instruments rather than the clairvoyant way that Bill Paxton just stares at the storm and knows which way it will go. Ultimately, he and his driver get sucked into the storm when he arrogantly ignores the heroes' warnings.
  • The Towering Inferno. You can't hate a fire, but you can hate the selfish, incompetent Roger Simmons. Jim Duncan also plays this role, to a lesser degree.
  • Sean Parker from The Social Network. In a story full of Gray and Gray Morality, he's the closest character portrayed as an outright villain due to how much of a Jerkass he is.
  • The Strange Thing About the Johnsons: Isaiah Johnson is a violent abuser who sexually abused his father for 14 years and later tried to kill his mother after deflecting the blame of his father's death from him.
  • Harvey Baylor in Planet of the Dinosaurs. The protagonists have all crash-landed on a far flung planet inhabited by prehistoric creatures, with no way to contact Earth and little hope of being rescued. Harvey proceeds to whine indiscriminately about how he's the Vice President of Spaceways Incorporated (and therefore their boss) and he can get them all fired, complains about having to do so much walking with no clear endpoint, and repeatedly sexually harasses his secretary. You can't hate the dinosaurs because they're dinosaurs (and barely put in any appearances in the movie anyway), and you can't hate the planet because it's a planet. But BOY can you hate Harvey Baylor! Thankfully he dies about halfway through the movie by being fatally gored by a Centrosaur and tossed off a cliff.
  • Stephen King movies (and the books they are based on):
    • You can't hate the titular eldritch abominations from The Langoliers (especially since they're just a creepy noise closing in from over the horizon for most of the story), and there's no one to really blame for stranding the characters in the past. But there's Toomy. Hateful, spiteful, assholish, with Freudian excuses and issues stacked high, who annoys, irritates and backstabs. You can't not hate Toomy. He gets eaten by the title Clock Roaches near the end of the movie.
    • In the live action production of The Mist, the monsters are terrifying but don't appear to be acting with true malice. They're just following their instincts to eat and reproduce. But boy, oh boy, can you ever hate Mrs. Carmody, the shrill, hateful Jesus freak who looks down her nose at anyone who isn't as "righteous" as she is and whipped the mob into a religious frenzy that almost resulted in the murder of the protagonist's young son.
    • Percy Wetmore in The Green Mile. You can't hate the racism in the '30s that put John Coffey on Death Row, you can't hate the system for making sure he'll die in the electric chair, and you sure as hell can't hate Old Sparky itself. But you can definitely hate Percy, who uses the fact that he's the nephew of the governor's wife to duck authority at every turn... even after deliberately sabotaging the execution of a convict he particularly hates simply because he hates him (and not for anything that got him on Death Row, he just personally hated him) having him fry alive in the chair, right after telling him his fantasy of a place for his mouse was a lie. His comeuppance comes in the form of Mr. Coffey, who "uses him as a gun" to kill a more proper villain, William Wharton, then leaves him catatonic.
    • Even though Andy Dufresne has been unlawfully convicted for the murder of his wife and her lover in The Shawshank Redemption, the justice system that put him there is too cold, distant, and impersonal to serve as a direct antagonist. Fortunately, that's where Warden Norton and his vicious lieutenant Captain Hadley step up to the fill the void. Warden Norton is a maddeningly self-assured corrupt hypocrite, who maintains a veil of friendliness but won't hesitate to abuse and exploit the inmates of Shawshank for his own personal gain, going so far as to have Andy thrown into solitary for a month just for calling Norton "obtuse", all the while Hiding Behind Religion as a justification for his immoral actions. Hadley is a vicious bully who has the nerve to bitch about the taxes he'll pay on $30,000 he's inheriting (a fortune in 1940s money, especially for a prison guard) and makes his true nature known early on by violently beating a prisoner to death for crying too loudly. The two of them collectively cross the Moral Event Horizon when Hadley shoots the young inmate who has proof of Andy's innocence, on Norton's orders, just so the Warden can keep Andy around to keep doing his paperwork for him. Their downfall is insanely cathartic to watch, when Andy escapes from prison, plays them both like a chump, and gets the Warden's crimes exposed, so that the Warden blows his brains out and Hadley gets thrown into jail with the same inmates he abused so much.
      • Bogs Diamond from the same film is a vicious rapist who makes Andy's first two years in prison a living hell and takes perverse joy in his victim's suffering. A sniveling coward when he doesn't have the numbers advantage on his side, Bogs clearly thinks of himself as the prison kingpin but has no authority beyond inflicting pain on others. Unlike Hadley and even the Warden, Bogs has absolutely zero redeeming moments, and one of the only ones for Captain Hadley comes when he beats Bogs so badly he's permanently crippled, something which nobody has the slightest complaint about.
    • It (1990) is a movie filled with unpleasant people. The titular monster is downright hilarious, so he's pretty much impossible to hate. However, it's very easy to hate the men in Beverly Marsh's life, particularly the nameless early boyfriends (one of whom broke her nose), her husband Tom Rogan (although he dropped dead after he saw IT in the book, his fate was left unresolved in the miniseries) and her violent, inscestual father. Several of the townspeople who looked away while the kids were being beaten up and might have died at the hands of IT also deserve the Hate Sink. And let's not let forget about Henry Bowers, due to the removal of all his book counterpart's redeemable qualities.
    • It (2017): Tim Curry's Pennywise was a monster to be sure, but it was counterbalanced by a bombastic sense of showmanship, so yeah, that Pennywise was too funny to be hated. This Pennywise lacks all of his predecessor's charm and is more or less, an engine of pure, unadulterated malevolence, coming off as a savage, craven, cowardly, sadistic predator by comparison. But his popularity inevitably made him a Love to Hate example.
      • Despite his limited screentime, it became very clear that Patrick Hockstetter was meant to be despised by the audience for his casual sadism and cruelty. And it is satisfying when Pennywise himself ate him.
      • Every scene with Greta Kenee serves just to showcase what a snotty, nasty little witch she is. Most of the audience was just aching for Pennywise to turn her into his next meal. Sadly, it never happens.
      • Her father, Norbert Keene, counts too. A liar, a creep and an overall bad man, sadly he too never gets any comeuppance.
      • A downplayed example with Sonia Kasprak, Eddie's mother, but she doesn't have an explicit excuse like in the book, so it does make her come off as schizophrenic.
      • Alvin Marsh, easily the most despicable adult in the entire film. He has no characterization outside of being a twisted, incestuous man.
  • Jennifer, also known as "Carrie...WITH SNAKES!" gives us two: Alpha Bitch Sandra Tremayne and the principal, Ms. Calley. Sandra is a sociopathic monster who tries to frame Jennifer for cheating on a test, then decides to ruin her life for exposing her as a liar. She goes as far as attempted murder and brutally kills Jennifer's beloved cat just to spite her. Ms. Calley is much less proactive, but always takes Sandra's side, despises Jennifer for her poor background, and even tries to fire the one teacher who does stand up for her. Both actresses are clearly aware this trope is in effect and pitch their performances accordingly.
  • Judy: Jack is a target in Judy's crusade against Abusive Parents. He openly neglects his ex-wife and son, laughs at his son's bullying and hospitalization even though it nearly killed him. On top of that, he openly sexually abusing his stepdaughter, Jamie. When Judy tortures him for his abuse, he's completely unrepentant, cowardly trying to justify himself and arrogantly acting like he's untouchable.
  • Jurassic Park:
    • Jurassic Park: Donald Gennaro, the lawyer. Specifically because of how different his character is in the book from the movie. In the book he is actually fairly competent and brave, not the useless, spineless character in the movie, illustrating the screenplay writers needed someone the audience to focus some hate on, because you can't hate the heroes or the dinosaurs right? He's the only person to not see any problem with cloning dinosaurs, shows his stupidity on the tour by asking if the live people are autoerotic (confusing the word with "animatronic"), and then abandons the children during the scene with the T-Rex. His comeuppance of getting eaten on the toilet is masterful. The movie version of Gennaro seems to be a Composite Character of Ed Regis from the book, who also abandoned the children during the T-Rex attack and ended up eaten.
    • Dennis Nedry is a lesser example: a snarky, arrogant slob who sabotages the Park's security fences so he can steal a bunch of embryos, knowing full well that he's placing children and many of his co-workers in danger by doing so. He mouths off even to his own co-conspirators, secures his PC with an obnoxious self-portrait (that grating "A-ah-ah!" is what does it), and is such a bad liar that only the fact he's a known social incompetent lets him get away with his rambling excuse. Plenty of laughs when he becomes Dilophosaurus munchies, and at the jaws of a critter he'd insulted to its face, no less.
    • Ironically, the book version of John Hammond fills the role very nicely; he's an arrogant rich bastard used to getting his own way and whose refusal to listen to criticism ends up getting numerous people killed. His comeuppance is falling prey to the dinosaurs himself at the very end, after it seems as though they're safe. In the movie he's upgraded to a kindly old man whose only faults are naïveté, overconfidence, and sexism in survival situations.
    • The Lost World: Jurassic Park has Dieter Stark, Roland's second-in-command. Of the villains, the InGen employees are just doing their jobs, Roland and Ajay are noble, honorable people, and Ludlow, despite being sometimes insensitive, has several good points and does little that is particularly villainous. Stark, on the other hand, is a sadistic prick who likes torturing animals and is disliked by his employer Roland for this very reason. It's quite satisfying when he meets a violent end by some of the dinosaurs he tormented.
    • Jurassic World: Vic Hoskins is an arrogant, manipulative, war-loving braggard who engineered the catastrophe on the island to steal the dinosaur embryos for military use, and dies pathetically begging for his life to a Velociraptor. Like many monster movies before it, this is essentially the creators hedging their bets. The Indominus rex is a terrifying unstoppable killing machine, but was designed for exactly that reason. Hoskins on the other hand is genuinely loathsome on a human level.
    • Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom: Eli Mills is a greedy businessman who specializes in torturing dinosaurs and selling them as weapons to criminals in order to make himself a profit. He even brutally kills Benjamin Lockwood via suffocation once the latter threatened to report him for his crimes. He is also cruel towards Maisie (who is technically his foster child) just for being a clone. Thus, it becomes needlessly fulfilling once he gets violently chewed up by the dinosaurs he abused throughout the film.
  • Resident Evil: Afterlife: Kim Coates plays the annoying Bennett, a movie producer trapped in an L.A. prison with a few other survivors. His character is the classic hatesink — utterly one dimensional and can be lifted right out of the story. He is rude, selfish, and disagrees with every other main character on decisions. When things start to go wrong he shoots a fellow survivor and then escapes in a small plane leaving the rest behind. Then in the climax he does the bidding of the main evil character so that he is saved. But he gets his just deserts when the heroes kill the main villain and leave him to be eaten by some unseen horror.
  • Unstoppable: You can't hate a runaway train, but you can hate Obstructive Bureaucrat Galvin. His comeuppance is that he loses his job afterwards.
  • George A. Romero's Living Dead Series of Zombie Apocalypse movies always include at least one of these; they usually have a big share of the blame in making things go From Bad to Worse.
  • Simon Canton in Deep Rising. The monsters are predators that live to consume, and most of the mercenaries are too cool and entertaining to reallly loathe. Canton, however, is only selfish, cowardly, and greedy. He's not so bad at first (having clearly established with Finnegan that he had planned for everyone aboard the boat to be safely evacuated), but he eventually tries to leave the other survivors for dead, then tries to kill Trillian, shrugs off all of the passengers' deaths because he can still scam the insurance agency if the ship sinks, and tries to steal Finnegan's boat. He meets a deliciously Karmic Death.
  • Dr. Gerhard Klopfer in Conspiracy (2001), who stands out as the most detestable character in a film filled with Nazis. He and his colleagues are all genocidal imperialists, but most of them are at least pragmatic, coldly efficient, or not completely unsympathetic (Kritzinger and Lange). Klopfer tops them all by being morbidly obese, gluttonous, ugly, rude, an open pervert, even more simple-mindedly racist than the others, and cowardly (he makes jokes about Heydrich's possible Jewish ancestry behind his back but dares not to say it to his face when dared to do so by Mueller).
  • In the movie Waiting..., the primary antagonist is the restaurant staff's soul-crushingly dull and miserable existence. Which is why we have the "biatch" who ordered the steak. She's only in one scene, but that was more than enough. Every single line of her dialogue is a condescending insult (including being angry her food was delivered too fast,) delivered with an infuriating sneer. When she drags out the "How hard is your job?!" line, that's when they've had enough. Even after watching them subject her food to the most disgusting act of revenge you could imagine, you'll still feel like she was let off too easy.
  • In St Helens, this role is split between Whittaker, the logging baron and Dr. Wagner, Jackson's boss at the geological survey. You can't hate a volcano for erupting, but you can hate people who ignore the protagonist's warnings and suggestions to evacuate. Whittaker is made less-likable by profiting off the media attention the volcanic activity brings the town, being rude to the protagonist's love interest, while Wagner verbally disparages the hero and hates him personally.
  • Like Tim Burton above, John Hughes really loves this trope.
    • The parents we see in The Breakfast Club are all abusive, self-absorbed assholes that exist to make the kids look much better by comparison.
  • Alfrid Lickspittle in The Hobbit Trilogy (especially The Battle Of The Five Armies), a Suspiciously Similar Substitute of Gríma Wormtongue without any redeemable qualities. He's a greedy opportunist who immediately kisses Bard's ass after the death of the former chief, yet before that he was supporting the latter against him. He treats the civilians like crap especially the women and when orcs invade the refugees' camp, he flees all battles and goes as far as disguising himself as an old woman. Needless to say, the audience would beg an Orc to kill him. Unfortunately, the theatrical cut has him pull a Karma Houdini, so audiences had to wait a year until the extended edition for his much-applauded Karmic Death.
  • Talbot in the 2003 Hulk seems purpose-made to make the audience loathe him. The real threat of the film is Bruce's evil, obsessed father David who is the root cause of the entire Hulk problem, and General Ross is a man trying to do what's right to stop a genuine menace, even if he goes out of his way to persecute Bruce out of prejudice. Talbot is just a smug corporate bastard who only wants fame and glory, endangers everyone by going over Ross's head to unleash the Hulk, bullies Bruce whenever he can and being a dickish romantic foil, and contributes little to the story besides repeatedly getting Bruce into Hulk-mode.
  • Many Godzilla films have one of these. After all, you can't hate Kaiju, but you can hate objectively terrible people.
  • Jimmy from Q: The Winged Serpent. A money-grubbing, obnoxious coward who doesn't care that innocent people are dying.
  • On one hand, Patty, Ned's girlfriend from School of Rock has a point about Ned letting his friend Dewey mooch off of him. On the other hand, she acts like an utter bitch who constantly henpecks Ned and takes delight in Dewey's misery. This eventually culminates in Ned leaving to go see Dewey and his band of students perform at Battle of the Bands, slamming the door in Patty's face while she ironically yells at him to stand up for himself for once.
  • Paparazzi reads like some Hollywood actor's revenge fantasy, where the main character basically spends the latter half of the film committing numerous acts of vigilante murder against the paparazzi who crippled his wife and put his son in a coma in an accident. The only reason this is even remotely acceptable is because the film depicts all paparazzo as cackling supervillains who take perverse joy in ruining people's lives, to the point that even the police are secretly rooting for the killer.
  • Being a killer-animal story, Snakes on a Plane has Paul, a businessman who is obnoxious for the sake of being obnoxious and only exists so the audience can cheer when he dies. In contrast, the guy who put the snakes on the plane simply disappears from the narrative entirely because there's no believable way to put him on the plane after take-off, and extending the action beyond what the audience came for would have probably induced Ending Fatigue.
  • Scowler from the Walking with Dinosaurs movie has proved himself to be unlikable due to being a Big Brother Bully to Patchi and picking on him for no reason. Then his hatedom increases when he thrashes Patchi in a battle and then kicks him out of the herd, leaves him to die, and doesn't let Juniper help him. Just because Patchi leads the herd off the icy lake, which Scowler led them onto in the first place. It makes it satisfying when Gorgon and his pack maul him to near death near the end of the film.
  • 12 Angry Men has Jurors #10 and #7. Jurors #3 and #4 are the most die-hard in favor of the conviction of the innocent defendant, but 3 has a Freudian Excuse (the defendant reminds him of his estranged son) and 4 has completely logical reasons for believing the defendant is guilty, so it's hard to hate either of them, especially 4. But we can definitely hate 10, who believes the defendant MUST be guilty because of his race and who even 3 and 4 despise despite technically being on the same side. 7 is a more neutral character, but he goes about his neutrality in the most assholish manner possible, not caring at all about doing justice or the fact that someone's life is at stake and simply voting with whoever's in the lead at the time so he can go home and watch a baseball game (or, in the stage version, attend a Broadway show).
  • Willow has Burglekutt, the prefect of Willow's village whose Establishing Character Moment involves his making it quite clear that he wants the hero's farmland. A minor Running Gag involves his head and/or face getting shit on by passing birds.
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has Violet's absolutely horrendous mother. While a major point in the book and both films is that the brats' parents made them the way they are, this overbearing Stage Mom in particular gets a lot of emphasis. And it's clear she's groomed her daughter to be an overachiever for herself and only herself.
  • Onodera in Gamera vs. Barugon is a gargantuan asshole whose pursuit of wealth is carried out with neither empathy nor honour. It's hard not to cheer when he gets eaten.
  • Paul Sarone in Anaconda. You can't hate the anaconda, but you can hate him. He is willing to sacrifice the protagonists in order to capture the anaconda.
  • Footloose, being a film with a very sympathetic main villain in Rev. Shaw Moore, has two of these.
    • Principal Roger Dunbar is of the weaselly but ultimately ineffectual variety; Bomont's Smug Snake head educator, he is a fundamentalist Christian to a degree that creeps out out even Reverend Moore. Dunbar shares all his scenes with Moore and his role in the film consists entirely of making Moore look better by comparison. Dunbar's role in ultimately brief, but Moore's witnessing how far he's willing to go is the push he needs for his own Heel–Face Turn.
    • Chuck Cranston, meanwhile, is a threat in his own right. Ariel Moore's trucker boyfriend, he bashes women both verbally and physically, looks down on college students, manipulates Ariel's emotions following her brother's death to get in her pants, spreads rumors about Ren McCormack after Ariel becomes interested in him, and is involved in the drug trade. He ultimately suffers a one-two karmic punch of having his prized truck trashed by Ariel, and then being beaten up himself by Ren later on.
  • Transformers: Age of Extinction has Attinger, an amoral, self-righteous hypocrite who instigated The Purge on the Autobots and commissioned an army of artificial drones made from the corpses of Autobots and Decepticons. He also has no problem in killing his fellow humans to keep his operations a secret, and sides with Lockdown in capturing Optimus, so he can get a cybertron Seed to create more transformium for his plans.
  • Elf is a feel-good holiday comedy about reconciliation between father and son Walter and Buddy Hobbs, and as such lacks a true villain, but it does have Fulton Greenway, the blowhard publisher of the book company Walter works for, and the reason why the latter is such a Christmas-hating workaholic. Greenway is the only character not to learn the True Meaning of Christmas in the film, and Walter's big redemption moment comes during a meeting with Greenway, held at night on Christmas Eve, where he realizes that his son is more important and tells Greenway where to stick it, leaving the latter ranting and raving in the boardroom. He's played by the same actor as Godzilla's Mayor Ebert, above.
  • The Martian has a subversion in the form of NASA Director Teddy Sanders. He's exactly the sort of jaded, cynical administrator figure one commonly finds in this role, seems to care more about NASA's budget and reputation than returning Watley to Earth at times, and the film's most catastrophic mistake, the rushing of the supply pod through inspection, leading to its disintegration on takeoff, is on him. Ultimately, however, Sanders never acts with malice toward anyone and wants Watley back on Earth just as much as his more idealistic subordinates do (the reason he did said pushing was because even on a best-case scenario Watney had a very limited amount of time for the supplies to reach him before he starved to death and even with all the rushing they were gonna cut it pretty close), and accordingly gets a happy ending.
  • Subverted with Mayor Vaughn in Jaws. Since the shark is just an animal, you can't really blame it for following its nature. You can blame the mayor however for ignoring the danger the shark poses, keeping the beach open, and outright lying to people about the danger. Early on, he seems much more dislikable than the shark. However, later on, we see that he does have a heart when he comforts Chief Brody, telling him he shouldn't blame himself for what happened to Alex. He has a Heel Realization moment when he sees the shark attack in a pond, and the second film implies that he's learned his lesson.
  • The Godfather's main villains are either Bitches in Sheep's Clothing whose villainy isn't discovered until late in the movie (Barzini), have little screen time (Tattaglia), or are Affably Evil and hard to hate (Solozzo). Most of our hatred goes to minor characters:
    • Carlo Rizzi. He's a Jerkass who abuses Connie verbally and physically, plays a key role in setting up Sonny's murder and turns out to be working for Barzini. He receives two immensely satisfying retributions: a No Holds Barred Beat Down from Sonny, and a gruesome strangulation death courtesy of Clemenza on Michael's orders.
    • Jack Woltz, a Hollywood producer who blocks Johnny Fontaine's career for purely personal and self-serving reasons and also turns out to be a pedophile. We feel bad for Khartoum, the horse that the Corleones have killed and whose head is placed in Woltz's bed, but Woltz himself deserves everything he gets.
    • Captain McClusky, a boorish Dirty Cop who's introduced calling Michael a guinea and breaking his nose, precipitating his Protagonist Journey to Villain. It's extremely satisfying when Michael blows his brains out.
  • In the live-action version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, the title character is still The Heavy causing the story's conflict, but receives a sympathetic backstory thanks to Adaptation Expansion, and even if he hadn't is pretty lovable all the same. A more directly loathsome character is original creation Augustus Maywho, Whoville's greedy mayor who thinks Christmas is all about the commercialism. He even turns out to have been one of the Grinch's boyhood bullies and to have stolen his adolescent flame Martha Whovier from him, thus playing a part in his Start of Darkness.
  • Mary Lou Barebone from Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is an odious Bible-thumping wizard-hater who beats her foster children and spreads slanderous anti-wizard propaganda around New York, all the while hiding behind an infuriatingly preening mask of arrogant righteousness. If that wasn't bad enough, she's also directly responsible for getting Tina Goldstein fired when she used magic to try to defend Credence from Mary's violent abuse. She's such a horrible mother and so fanatically anti-magic that she makes the Dursleys look positively sanctified in comparison. It is impossible to feel even the slightest bit of sympathy for her when Credence lashes out with his powers and she dies wearing an expression of obviously horrific agony.
  • Troy: Agamemnon, Menelaus' brother and the leader of the Greek army. Firstly, he lacks redeeming features (like Paris' Adaptational Heroism or Menelaus' Villainous Valour), except a brief Even Evil Has Loved Ones moment when his brother is killed. The rest of the time, he's portrayed as an arrogant and self-serving ambitious monarch, as well as a cowardly backstabbing armchair general who is sitting behind his troops in the midst of battle. The film even takes it a step further by showing that he caused the Greeks to lose the early engagements of the Trojan War with his arrogance (specifically in the first attempt to besiege Troy) and never portray him clashing in melee with the Trojans. And let's not forget about the time he "gave" Briseis to the men...
  • No Strings Attached: Vanessa is Adam Franklin’s ex girlfriend, whom leaves him for his own father, Alvin, straining the relationship of the latter two. Vanessa tries to ingratiate herself with Alvin by planning to have a child with him, an action which provokes Emma Kurtzman into calling her out for her past and current treatment of Adam. When Alvin overdoses on cough syrup, an action for which Vanessa is responsible, albeit unintentionally, she leaves Adam with her dog while she ditches Alvin to go to a party, refusing to take responsibility for her actions. Hedonistic, materialistic and self centred, Vanessa proves herself to be a thoroughly terrible person, despite being a relatively tame character in a relatively tame film.
  • Robot and Frank centers around a Villain Protagonist who uses a robot caretaker to help him in his burglary schemes, so to help preserve audience sympathy, his main victim isn't presented in the best light. Said victim is Jake, who's sponsoring the public library in Frank's neighborhood, but is haphazardly disposing of the books in favor of more modern formats and putting Jennifer, Frank's love interest, out of a job. He's also generally irritating and full of himself, and is quite well-off, to the point where we don't feel too bad when Robot and Frank eventually steal some jewelry he keeps in a safe.
  • Alligator: Mr. Slade, a Corrupt Corporate Executive, has his researchers experiment on puppies to get the hormone, and has them pay a pet store owner to dognap puppies when they run out of their legal supply. These experiments lead to an alligator who lives in the sewers becoming giant and getting a ravenous appetite. This was an accident, so it can't be held against him. However, he has the mayor hinder the investigation in order to keep his company going. During the climax, the alligator attacks his daughter's wedding. He makes a beeline for his car, locks it, and tries to drive away and leave everybody else tibdie. The alligator gets him anyways.
  • American History X: Despite the movie's message that hate is baggage, Cameron Alexander comes across as a completely despicable individual without a single redeeming quality. He is responsible for the corruption of Derek and others, feeding into their latent bigotry and inciting hate crimes. While he acts the part of A Father to His Men, in the past, he has been more than willing to throw his men under the bus when it benefits him. When Derek returns from prison reformed, he makes a mockery of his rape in prison. In a deleted scene, he appears to display compassion towards a homeless veteran, but only with the intent of spreading his racist beliefs. Shortly after, he menaces an interracial couple and drives them out of the diner.
  • Kingdom of Heaven:
    • Raynald de Chatillon fanatically hates the Muslims and seeks any excuse to slaughter them. He also believes that since he is a noble, he can do as he likes. When he gets punished and imprisoned for it, he merely tries to find a way out of it, and when he does ultimately get freed (due to a new king pardoning him) Raynald slaughters yet another caravan including Saladin's sister. In the end, when he gets captured by Saladin, he shows no remorse for his actions.
    • His boss, Guy de Lusignan could arguably be considered even worse. He participates in all of Raynald's actions and asks Raynald to take a blame for all of them. While Raynald does it out of fanatism, Guy uses Raynald's fanaticism as a way to gain power. At one point, when a Muslim messenger comes and offers peace, Guy murders him as a declaration of war. It is very satysfying to see the humaliation that Guy later goes through.
  • Ladyhawke: The Big Bad, the Bishop of Aquila, is very, very hateable. He casts a curse on two lovers so they will never be able to love each other — Navarre also says that while hawks and wolves mate for life, the Bishop did not even leave them that option, just because he wants the lady of the pair, Isabeau, for himself. He also instructs the hunter Cezar to trap wolves, hoping to actually kill Navarre during the night when he is in his wolf form. Plus his ways to rule over the region.
  • The entire army of the Teutonic Knights in Alexander Nevsky since they slaughter innocent civilians and throw crying toddlers into bonfire. Grand Master in particular since he is their leader is this.
    • The Bishop counts too. He might not directly ordered the crimes, but he gave his blessings to them.
    • Finally, Tverdillo qualifies big time. He betrayed the Russian people and helped the German Teutonic knights in their crimes. It was very satisfying to see him being torn by the mob.
  • In Star Trek Beyond, one of Krall's two Dragons is Kalara, his former science officer, Jessica Wolff, whose role in his scheme is to be a Bitch in Sheep's Clothing running a Wounded Gazelle Gambit to lure well-meaning spacers into the nebula to be torn apart by his swarm and the survivors enslaved and then systematically killed to fuel the Big Bad Trio's life-extension technology. Their most recent victims of this plot are the crew of the Enterprise. It's extremely satisfying to see Captain Kirk outwit her and finish her off by flipping the remains of the destroyed saucer on top of her, smashing her into the terrain like a particularly insignificant bug.
  • To balance out the charismatic and humorous main villain, Dean from Kingsman: The Secret Service is a jerkass, domestic abuser gang leader who thinks he owns his family and can do with them whatever he pleases. He gets his comeuppance in The Stinger, when Eggsy comes to collect his mother and sister and lays a beatdown on him and his thugs.
  • In Contagion, you can't really hate a nonsentient virus. You can hate Alan Krumwiede, a fame-hungry conspiracy theorist that's more than willing to lie to and defraud thousands of people, possibly resulting in their deaths.
  • Good Morning, Vietnam: We have Sgt. Maj. Dickerson, who is a Gung Holier Than Thou Jerkass that hates Adrian Cronauer's guts just because he wishes to bring humor to the troops on the front line and does everything in his power (including accepting Cronauer's request to interview some troops on the field and then sending him into an area with strong VC opposition and mined roads without telling him in hopes of getting him killed) to get rid of him. At the end of the film, he's able to get Cronauer kicked out of the Air Force because he had unwittingly made friends with a VC guerrilla, but General Taylor (their commanding officer) finally sees Dickerson for the overly petty and psychotically vindictive asshole that he is and has him reassigned to Guam while pointing out that everything Dickerson did was just to maintain control over a radio station.
  • Pan's Labyrinth has Captain Vidal, who is far scarier and eviler than any of the monsters in the Labyrinth. Unusually for the Big Bad of a fantasy movie, his evil acts are deliberately kept too terrifyingly realistic to qualify for Evil Is Cool. Vidal first shows his nastiness when two poachers, a father and son, are brought to him in the dead of night, his men suspecting them of being rebels against the regime. He beats the younger man's face in with a bottle simply for defending his father against Vidal's accusations before shooting them both with a vague air of boredom and pleasure. When the men are proven not to be rebels, Vidal is regretful, but only because it means his men wasted his time and weren't careful enough. Vidal is married to the young heroine's mother solely so she'll bear him an heir, and shows no concern over the possible death of his wife in childbirth. When the doctor attending her gives the aforementioned stuttering torture victim a mercy kill, Vidal coldly guns him down. At the film's end, Vidal's stepdaughter Ofelia tries to rescue her baby brother, but Vidal catches her and promptly shoots her fatally.
  • The Shape of Water: In this del Toro film, Richard Strickland is featured as the film's sink of hate. He is a bigoted and sadistic government agent who is primarily hated for being very cruel to The Asset, torturing him relentlessly with a cattle prod and deems him inferior to humans because of his appearance. Sure, Strickland did get two of his fingers bitten off by The Asset but its heavily implied that he had been torturing the asset long before this incident happen. His only apparent redeeming quality is that he has a wife and two kids who he treats well at home but that does not save him because he is shown to be unfaithful to his wife by sexually harassing the women in the government area he works in, doing such harassment towards the mute protagonist, Eliza.
  • The Room: Lisa is supposed to be this, cheating on Johnny and then falsely accusing him of hitting her just as an excuse to break up with him. The problem is that she doesn't really come off much worse than any of the other main characters, apart from not having the prerequisite genitals to get away with being a dick to everyone in this universe.
    • Her mother manages to be a more effective example, coming across as little more than a gold-digging snob who has given up on the idea of love.
  • Finn from Snow White and the Huntsman is one of the most repulsive villains in any version of Snow White. He first appears when he helps his sister Queen Ravenna invade Snow White's father's castle and he develops an incredibly creepy obsession with Snow White, despite her only being 7 years old. 10 years later he attempts to rape her and cut her heart out for Ravenna. He spends most of the film pursuing Snow White and gleefully torches a village that was protecting her. He truly cements his monster status when he boasts to Eric, the title huntsman, about how his wife stands out from all the women he raped and killed over the years. His Karmic Death is the most satisfying moment in the film.
    • Ravenna herself crosses over into this trope herself in the sequel when we discover she burned her sister's baby daughter to death.
  • Once Upon a Time in the West: Frank. An utterly despicable Child Hater who has no redeemable or likable traits whatsoever. Years ago, he killed off Harmonica's brother in probably the most sadistic way possible, and now he goes and kills off a farming family, including their youngest son. Then he advances on the widow. He is clearly meant to garner much of the viewers' hatred and revulsion as possible.
  • Pirates of the Caribbean:
    • Lord Cutler Beckett, the Big Bad of the original trilogy. In a series starring pirates as Villain Protagonists, where the leads constantly backstab each other to further their conflicting agendas, and even initially heroic people like Will, Elizabeth and Norrington become more morally gray over time, Beckett still manages to stick out as one of the most despicable individuals in the franchise. Not only does he lack any of the cool, redeeming, supernatural or sympathetic qualities that make characters like Jack Sparrow, Barbossa, and Davy Jones fun to watch, Beckett is portrayed as nothing more than a smug, sociopathic aristocrat, even as he pursues an ostensibly admirable goal: the elimination of piracy. Yet, unlike Captain Salazar who's a genuine Knight Templar, Beckett doesn't discriminate in murdering thousands of people—whether guilty or innocent—and it's all done for the banal goal of keeping his business profitable.
    • Blackbeard, the Big Bad of fourth film, who went as far as attempting to sacrifice his own daughter to save his skin.
  • Marvel Cinematic Universe:
    • General Thunderbolt Ross is an Obstructive Bureaucrat who takes joy in punishing and harassing the Avengers during his appearances in The Incredible Hulk and Captain America: Civil War. In Avengers: Infinity War, he intends to have the Avengers prosecuted while fully knowing that the entire universe is at stake with Thanos' forces. In-universe, none of the Avengers have anything positive to say about him with even those who sign the accords changed their mind no thanks to his incompetence.
    • Guardians of the Galaxy: Much of the setting is filled with jerkasses and criminals, but you can't really hate them. Those, like the main characters, have tragic pasts, and others, such as Yondu, have a nobler side to them in spite of their selfishness. The one being with no likable traits is Ronan the Accuser. He is a genocidal fanatic Kree who has a deep hatred towards the Xandarians, brutally smashed a captive's skull, bathed in the blood of the other captives he has killed, slaughtered Drax's family and massacred an entire prison. As a result, his acts come off as too disgusting to fall under Evil Is Cool. He surprisingly even manages to outmatch Thanos, as seen in Infinity War, in terms of despicableness. It's really saying something if the Mad Titan hates the Kree ex-accuser. Captain Marvel (2019) shows him being horrid in his treatment towards his Kree soldiers especially when they fail, and they hold him in contempt for indiscriminately nuking planets, which is what he's been doing to other alien races that the Kree deems inferior, such as the Skrulls. That being said, he was willing to allowed his fellow Kree perished on his way while blowing up an entire civilization to take out the innocent Skrulls.
    • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 presented Ego, Peter Quill's father who turns out to be a selfish god like alien that desires to have all life turn into copies of himself. He even killed Quill's mother by putting a brain tumor into her so he could avoid falling in love with her. Plus he's revealed to have fathered thousands of children so he could turn them into accomplices for his plan with each one of them being killed in the process and he tried to do even worse to Quill.
  • mother!: Him is a self-absorbed poet who allows humanity to trash His house, making him indirectly responsible for all of the atrocities they commit in the film, and inadvertently causes the death of His son when the hordes accidentally kill and eat him. Even when He saves mother from being beaten, He tries to convince her to forgive the crowd and later rips her heart out to start the cycle anew.
  • GoodFellas: An infamous example, as this film was well-known for portraying mobsters as massive Hate Sinks. The movie actually manages to portray the monstrosity of most of the mobsters, especially Tommy and Jimmy.
    • Tommy DeVito is a confrontational mobster who disturbingly teases or antagonizes with people for very pathetic reasons. He's really a kind of fear even to his own partners (as given to notice in the "funny guy" scene), because they know that any phrase or word misunderstood by Tommy can easily lead a senseless murder. He certainly crosses this territory with the cruel treatment to Spider (a 19-ish year old boy), shooting him in the foot with a sadistic glee. Then he ruthlessly kills him.
    Tommy: [after killing Spider] I'm a good shot, what do you want from me?
    Anthony: How could you miss at this distance?
    Tommy: You got a problem with what I did, Anthony? Fucking rat, anyway. His family's all rats, he'd have grown up to be a rat.
    Jimmy: Stupid bastard, I can't fucking believe you. Now, you're gonna dig the fucking thing now. You're gonna dig the hole. I got no fucking lime, you're gonna do it.
    Tommy: Fine! I'll dig the fucking hole, I don't give a fuck. What is it, the first hole I ever dug? I'll fucking dig the hole. Where are the shovels?
    • Jimmy Conway as well. The movie went to his way to portray him as despicable as possible by the second half. After the Lufthansa heist, he eventually became an homicidal, disloyal, greedy and increasingly paranoid scumbag willing to betray anyone to fill his pockets.
  • Casino: Ginger is shrill, extremely greedy, solipsistic, self-destructively foolish, and generally unlikable in every possibly way. It's easy to see what attracted Ace to her in the first place, but the fact that a stone-cold pragmatist like him tolerates her bullshit for as long as he does is utterly baffling.
  • Death Machine: The movie makes it clear from the get-go that the Greater-Scope Villain is Mega-Corp CHAANK Industries, a cabal of corrupt executives perfectly willing and able to do horrible things to children, soldiers (and anybody unlucky enough to get in the effective lethal radius of their weapons projects) to get a dime. This company's mentality is represented by Carpenter (a Fat Bastard Corrupt Corporate Executive), who himself is grossed out by Brad Dourif's Jack Dante (the Psychopathic Manchild Mad Scientist that heads some of CHAANK's most brutal projects, including Hardman and "Warbeast", the titular Mechanical Abomination).
  • Breakdown: Since most of the film revolves around Jeff Taylor desperately clawing his way through for his missing wife, Amy, it's very obvious that the supposedly helpful trucker who calls himself "Red Barr" when his name is actually "Warren" is meant to be rooted against as he turns out to be a cruel, cold-blooded, and sociopathic serial killer who lures his unwary victims into a trap and has them killed by his thugs in disguise for both a living and for his own greed. Red fulfills his schemes by means of lying, making Jeff paranoid and distraught by playing mind games, refusing to listen to reason, and deliberately breaking promises to let Amy go. Even though Red has a beloved wife and son, this was obviously meant to be inexcusable since he has lied to them entirely as well. Since all of this is evident in the third act, the audience can tell how much Jeff hates that guy, and Amy's abundant fear of him also counts.
  • As an allegorical film, mother! paints humanity as a whole as an abominable species who commit multiple vile acts in the house, the most controversial being cannibalizing mother and Him's son after they accidentally kill it. Him himself is also depicted as being ignorant at best to unwilling at worst to kick the people out of the house because they worship him for his poetry.
  • X-Men Film Series:
    • Logan: Dr. Zander Rice is presented as a cruel, heartless Mad Scientist who experiments on young mutant children to grow up to be Child Soldiers, while constantly viewing them as objects (which mercilessly lead to some of the children committing suicide); being held responsible for the deaths of each of their birth mothers. He then demands each of the children to be euthanized and proceeds to make the X-24 mutant as a mindless killing machine which goes on to slaughter an entire innocent family. In a wildly refreshing moment, Logan unceremoniously shoots Dr. Rice in the neck after the latter gives a Motive Rant of how he has eradicated the entirety of the mutant population.
    • Deadpool (2016): Ajax is a high ranking member of the Weapon X program and the one responsible for Deadpool's creation. Under the guise of making those that come under his care "superheroes," he subjects them to weeks of torture to awaken their mutant gene before selling them off to the highest bidder. Kidnapping Vanessa and locking her in an oxygen chamber, he laughs maliciously, revealing that there was no cure for Deadpool's transformation.
    • Deadpool 2 features the Orphanage Headmaster who sadistically tortures young mutants under his care due him considering them to be "abominations". He is especially cruel towards Russell, which eventually results in the latter's Start of Darkness that contributes to Cable's Bad Future. He is also proven to be a Dirty Coward once Russell hunts him down; even being an Ungrateful Bastard once Deadpool and his gang manage to spare him from Russell's wrath. He eventually gets killed by Dopinder's taxi in the most cathartic way possible.
  • Venom (2018): Every action Carlton Drake takes oozes with despicableness; from ruining Eddie's life for daring to ask sensitive questions to sacrificing countless homeless people for his unethical experiments to blackmailing (and eventually killing) any employee who has a conscious. The only thing that the audience would like about him is that he becomes Riot, but that is mostly due to the symbiotie rather than the actual man.
  • A Nightmare on Elm Street: As entertaining as he can be, Freddy Krueger is an absolute depraved monster who is guilty of murdering children, murdering his wife, murdering the parents of his victims, manipulate Jason Voorhees by appearing in the form of his mother and attempted to rape the daughter of a woman he killed after revealing his actions to her. In no way is he ever depicted as capable of redemption.
  • Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers: John Strode gets this for not only being an abusive father, but for disowning his daughter because she got pregnant premaritally. Needless to say, people were cheering for Michael when he electrocutes him.
  • Unlike the Flat Character Bandit Chief in Seven Samurai and the Affably Evil Calvera from The Magnificent Seven (1960) who has an Alas, Poor Villain moment, Bartholomew Bogue from The Magnificent Seven (2016) gives the audience every opportunity to hate him. For example: he slaughters several townsfolk when they speak up against him, murders one of his own men for bringing him a message he doesn't like, has several of his own men mowed down when he has the town shot up with a Gatling gun, and participated in the rape and murder of Chisolm's mother and sisters several years before.
  • Rambo IV has Major Tint. Every single action he does onscreen is a massive Kick the Dog moment, and he even spends most of the climax being a Dirty Coward. That's enough to give the audience an excuse to hate him.
  • The Phantom of the Opera (1962):
    • Lord Ambrose D'Arcy is a totally despicable Jerkass who is nasty to everyone around him. He's also a letch, only intending to give Christine the leading role in "his" opera if she agrees to sleep with him, and dismissing her when she refuses to do so. Finding out that the aforementioned opera D'Arcy's getting all the glory for supposedly writing was in fact stolen from a struggling unknown composer (the future Phantom) just makes him all the more worthy of the audience's hatred.
    • There's also the dwarf, whose sole purpose for being written into this particular adaptation of the story was to perform all the murders so the Phantom's own hands would be clean, and thus the latter would be seen as more sympathetic than his counterparts in other versions.
  • In a departure from how its parent film franchise portrays its human antagonists, Bumblebee has Jack Burns portrayed quite sympathetically, being caring of his subordinates, wanting to destroy Bumblebee only to protect the planet and eventually realizing Bumblebee is a hero at the end. However, the movie gives every reason for us to hate Charlie's Alpha Bitch classmate Tina. Aside from being petty towards the former, including humiliating her at work, she decides to take things too far by making fun of Charlie's dead father. Thus, no sympathy is given to her when Bumblebee takes a prank involving egging her car one step further by jumping on it, thus turning it into scrap metal. He, Charlie, and Memo are clearly enjoying it, and the audience likely is too.
  • Reginald Charming from Tricky People. A man who abuses and lusts over underage girls, takes raunchy photos of them, and even stores them in a special vault? Many people can agree that Yello Dyno should've smashed the guy's face in with the vault door when he had the chance.
  • Universal Soldier: The Return: SETH's Dragon, Romeo. Whereas SETH is actually a charismatic and cunning villain, Romeo is a brutish oaf and Implacable Man who is also smug, spouting grating one-liners, and is even implied to have been a rapist in his past life.
  • Middle School The Worst Years Of My Life: Principal Dwight falls into this trope hard. He takes great joy in destroying students personal property and creating a bunch of dumb rules that don't even matter in regular schools. Like the dress code, respecting the principal, no form of creativity whatsoever. Plus he's proven several times to be a selfish jerk who cares about his school more than the students, and framed an innocent class for the vandals in the school, and suspended them even after Rafe confessed what he did. Plus he rigged the B.L.A.A.R. quiz just so his school could be #1. One has to wonder, how this man qualified to become principal in the first place.
  • The Rock: While General Francis X. Hummel drives the conflict, he doesn't have evil motivations, so we have FBI Director Womack taking the audience's ire by being incredibly belligerent and antagonistic towards everyone.
  • Set It Up:
    • Rick Otis is a high ranking New York executive who regularly mistreats his subordinates, and is introduced having Charlie Young scramble to get him dinner. Throughout the film, Rick has Charlie do other menial tasks, such as working on a science project for the former's son, and saving seats at the aforementioned son's play. When an intern brings an item into Rick's office relating to his ex wife, Kiki, Rick fires the intern, calling him a "pencil dick" for good measure. After being manipulated into a relationship with fellow executive Kirsten Stevens, courtesy of the latter's assistant Harper Moore, as well as Rick's own assistant Charlie, Rick blames Kirsten for a bad date after eating raw beef at a Korean restaurant. Eventually, once his relationship with Kirsten resumes, Rick lets slip to Charlie that he is cheating on Kirsten with Kiki.
    • Suze is Charlie's vapid, self-absorbed Supermodel girlfriend who is obsessed with prestige and status. When Charlie invites her to the school play where Rick's son is performing, Suze complains about Charlie not being higher up in his career. In a later scene, Suze is seen flirting with other men, prompting Charlie to join Harper at her best friend's engagement party when the latter's date does not make contact. When Suze and Charlie eat dinner at an expensive restaurant, Suze makes a big deal about said restaurant being the venue for Kanye West's half birthday. Suze responds to Charlie breaking up with her at the restaurant by whining that Charlie is supposed to be her "backup".

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