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Pokémon come in 18 different types, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. When the franchise began, these types were little more than gameplay elements, but over the years, Game Freak and the fandom have added more than enough depth to the types to make them characters in their own right.


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    Normal 

Normal-Type (ノーマルタイプ nohmaru taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/normal_types_3.png
Normal-type Pokémon are the Non-Elemental of the series. It's not too useful offensively, but their diverse movepools make them capable of some truly impressive Confusion Fu. Unlike most types, which have some kind of obvious unifying theme, Normal-types can be anything from common animals to bizarre Cartoon Creatures. A few Pokémon, such as Ditto, Castform, Kecleon, Meloetta, Silvally, or Arceus, whose main gimmick revolves around changing their types or not relying on types at all, are Normal-types in their natural state.

They make their habitats in any region that they can call home, being the most exceptional generalists of the 18 types. Normal is the second most-common type.

They make up most of the Com Mons, but there are a few outliers like Snorlax and Blissey. Arceus, the creator deity of the Pokémon world, is Normal-type in its default form.

Normal-type attacks are strong against no types, are resisted by Rock and Steel, and do not affect Ghost. Normal-types are only weak to Fighting-type attacks, and are immune to Ghost.


  • Action Bomb: The moves Self-Destruct and Explosion, which both knock out the user in exchange for inflicting massive damage on the opponent, are Normal moves.
  • Action Initiative:
  • Always Accurate Attack:
    • Swift, Trump Card, Confide, Play Nice, and Tearful Look bypass accuracy and evasion checks when used.
    • Lock-On and Mind Reader cause the next attack to always hit even during the semi-invulnerable periods of moves like Fly and Dig.
    • And as a variation, Odor Sleuth and Foresight removes Ghost-type immunity and reset Evasion to default.
  • Armor-Piercing Attack:
    • As mentioned above, Feint breaks through moves like Protect.
    • Chip Away ignores changes in the target's Defense. That's exactly what it does — it ignores increases in defense, but also decreases. (It also ignores modifiers to Evasion.)
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Hyper Beam and Giga Impact are widespread and powerful attacks, but they have a recharge turn after use that forces the user to stay in battle and be unable to do anything. What makes this Awesome, but Impractical is that the opponent can use this turn to do anything they like — healing, switching, boosting, or just beating the crap out of you. Chances are, your opponent's free turn will more than offset the damage your attack did. Even worse, you can most likely deal just as much (if not more) damage with any other move with an effective base 75 power or more — just use it twice in a row. In other words, there is next to no reason to ever use Hyper Beam or any other move that requires two turns to execute.
    • Trump Card has the unique property of increasing in power as its PP depletes, up to 200 Power on the final attack. However, it's very weak for the first few attacks and it's difficult surviving long enough for the power to reach its maximum.
    • Horn Drill and Guillotine will KO the target no matter what (unless its Ability is Sturdy). However, it has an accuracy of 30% if both Pokémon are at the same level, and if the target's level is greater, the attack will fail. The only way to increase the accuracy of the OHKO moves is to have a level advantage: one level higher is one extra percent. If a Pokémon has a 20-level advantage to grant a 50% accuracy for these moves, then there are probably other moves in the Pokémon's arsenal that could one-shot its opponent with better efficiency. If you have a 50-level advantage, you can one-shot your opponent with Tackle or some similarly laughably weak move.
  • Badass Normal: The best way to describe some of the tougher Normal-types. They have weak Special Attacks and limited Special Movepools, but their physical stats and prowess with such moves are excellent.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • Rapid Spin, Swords Dance, Substitute, Protect, Baton Pass, Encore, and Fake Out. Normal-type moves like these aren't particularly flashy and most don't deal damage, but they can make or break entire battles.
    • Although Normal-types lack super-effective STAB coverage and have very little in the way of resistances, they can fill a wide variety of roles and find effective use on a team, both for serious battling and in-game adventuring.
  • Brown Note: Perish Song is a cursed song that causes all Pokémon that hear it to instantly faint in three turns. The curse can be nullified by switching out, so utilizing trapping moves and stalling ("Perish Trapping") is practically a requirement to effectively use Perish Song.
  • Cartoon Creature: A lot of Normal-types look quite bizarre, even if they have recognizable basis. Just look at Lickitung and Audino for a few examples.
  • Cast from Hit Points: Take Down, Double Edge, and Head Charge deal damage to the user equal to a fraction of the damage dealt to opponents; 1/4 for Take Down and Head Charge and 1/3 for Double Edge.
    • Belly Drum consumes 50% of the user's max HP and boosts its Attack to the maximum. Substitute consumes 25% of the user's max HP to create a decoy with that amount of HP to take attacks for it, while also blocking status attacks outright. If the user would be brought to 0 or less HP by either move, it fails.
  • Charged Attack: Razor Wind and Skull Bash both require the user to spend a turn doing nothing before the attack. As a result, they fall squarely into Awesome, but Impractical territory, though they at least have an increased critical hit chance and raise the user's Defense, respectively.
    • Spit Up plays it a little differently — it only works after the user has used Stockpile at least once, and deals more damage if the user has used Stockpile more than once, consuming all charges in the process.
  • Color-Coded Elements: Normal-types are represented by a warm grey to represent their low interaction with other types. In practice, Normal-types tend to be grey, brown, or pink.
  • Com Mons: The majority of Com Mons are Normal-types, but the opposite is not necessarily true. This includes Rattata, Sentret, Zigzagoon, Patrat, Lillipup, and a majority of early Flying-types who have Normal as their second type.
  • Confusion Fu:
    • Normal-types tend to have large and extremely versatile movepools to go with their Jack of All Trades nature.
    • Hidden Power has the potential to become any type but Normal and Fairy. The trainer can't determine its type without consulting the regional Hidden Power checker or doing a lot of math with hidden values, and its animation has no clue to what typing it is.
    • Assist can become almost any attack that another Pokémon in the trainer's party knows, while Metronome can become almost any attack, period. note 
  • Counter Attack: Bide causes the user to charge for two turns, and then attack on the third turn for double the damage it took during the charging period.
  • Critical Hit Class: The moves Slash and Razor Wind have a higher than normal chance of causing Critical Hits. Also of note is the move Focus Energy, which raises the user's overall chances of landing a critical hit and is useful for any Pokémon that plans to specialize in doing so.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Normal-type moves bar Hidden Power were Physical attacks. Hidden Power's classification of Physical or Special was based off of what Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors type it ended up (i.e. if it was Bug it was Physical, if it was Ice it was Special), though from Diamond and Pearl onward it's always Special.
  • Desperation Attack: Struggle can only be used by Pokémon that cannot use any more moves (either due to totally running out of PP or being locked into one move and running out of PP for that one). While it's considered a Normal-type move, the move is truly non-elemental because it doesn't apply Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors. It also damages the user by 1/4th of its max HP with each use, so when a Pokémon starts using Struggle, the battle's going to be over quick.
  • Disc-One Nuke: TM27 Return is obtained early in the game in Black 2 and White 2 and X and Y. With enough patience and walking around, it's possible to have a 102 power attack before tackling the first few gyms. Considering that most moves in the early-game have half that power at best, that's quite powerful. It's even more effective if used by a Normal-type, as its strength increases to 153 power, stronger than a STAB-less Giga Impact. More moves will become available, but until then Return has incredible power.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: None
      • Weak: Rock, Steel
      • Can't Hit: Ghost
    • Defense
      • Strong: None
      • Weak: Fighting
      • Immune: Ghost
  • Fire/Ice/Lightning: Tri Attack is depicted as firing three balls of fire, ice, and electric energy.
  • Fixed Damage Attack: Sonic Boom does exactly 20 damage to anything that's not a Ghost-type.
  • Heal Thyself: Recover, Soft-Boiled, Milk Drink, Slack Off, and Morning Sun all restore the user's HP. Swallow does the same, but only if the user has some charges stored from using Stockpile. Refresh doesn't heal any HP, but it cures some of the major Standard Status Effects.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: Captivate, Growl, Hyper Voice, Leer, Razor Wind, Relic Song, Sweet Scent, Swift, and Tail Whip affect all foes while Boomburst, Explosion, Self-Destruct, and Teeter Dance hit everyone but the user.
  • HP to 1: False Swipe and Hold Back deal normal damage but cannot cause a KO, leaving the target with at least 1 HP. Useful for catching Pokémon.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: As far as matchups go, it's nicely balanced, being weak to one type and immune to another. Offensively, Normal-type moves aren't particularly useful except for S.T.A.B. (Same Type Attack Bonus), which enhances the strength of the moves by 50% as long as the user is the same type.
  • Jack of All Trades: They can also fulfill various roles with their plethora of attacking options.
  • Last Chance Hit Point: Endure allows the user to survive lethal attacks with 1 HP left for the duration of the turn. Especially powerful when combined with Flail and Reversal (which gain strength the lower the user's HP is).
  • Last Disc Magic: Hyper Beam and Giga Impact are usually available to buy as a TM late in the game or can be learned naturally by some Pokémon during the late- or post-game.
  • Limit Break: The Normal-type Z-Move is Breakneck Blitz, in which the user crashes into the foe at full speed.
  • Luck-Based Mission: Hidden Power's type (and power before X and Y) is dependent on a hidden stat value that each Pokémon has, not that the games tell you this. It's pretty much impossible to influence what you'll get without breeding (impractical before the credits roll and time-consuming regardless), manipulating the games' Random Number God system (only possible before X and Y), or just cheating.
  • Make Me Wanna Shout: Snore, Uproar, Hyper Voice, Round, Echoed Voice, Relic Song, and Boomburst are all damaging sound-based Normal moves. As of X and Y, they can hit Pokémon that are behind a Substitute.
  • Mix-and-Match Critters: A lot of Normal-types are based on one animal, but have characteristics of other animals. Slaking is a gorilla mixed with a sloth, Eevee has canine and feline traits, Staraptor resembles a cross between a starling and a bird of prey, and so on.
  • Mutual Disadvantage: Normal-types cannot be harmed by Ghost-types, but they can't harm Ghost-types either.
  • Nerf:
    • Explosion and Self-Destruct no longer halves the target's Defense starting in Generation V, effectively halving its power.
    • Horn Drill and Guillotine (and Fissure) based the hit possibility on Speed in Generation I and was affected by accuracy and evasion modifiers. Using X Accuracy (which made all attacks hit) on a fast Pokémon with Fissure could quickly defeat teams, even if using an underleveled Pokémon. Generation II changed these moves to the level-based hit possibility, and they ignore accuracy and evasion modifiers.
    • Hyper Beam in Generation I did not have a recharge turn if the Pokémon knocked out its opponent or broke a Substitute. In Generation II and beyond, the attack always has a recharge turn.
  • Non-Elemental: Are this in the type-chain. Against the other 17 types, Normal is resisted by two and one is immune. The other types, including itself, all take normal damage. On the downside, Normal moves are not super effective against any type either.
  • Non-Indicative Name: There are many Pokémon who aren't "normal" in the slightest, but are Normal-type solely because they don't fit into any of the other types. Good examples of this would be Arceus (the creator of the universe) and Type: Null (a chimera of parts from other Pokémon).
  • One-Hit KO: Horn Drill and Guillotine will instantly KO the target if they connect.
  • Percent Damage Attack: Super Fang cuts the current HP of the target in half.
  • The Power of Friendship: Return. Its power is dependent on how the user's Friendship Value is, maxing out at 102 power. Inverted with Frustration, which has the same power when the Value is as low as possible.
  • Puppy-Dog Eyes: Tearful Look lowers makes the target lose its combative spirit, lowering its Attack and Special Attack.
  • Quirky Bard: There are a lot of Normal-type Pokémon whose main features are gimmicks. Ditto can transform into other Pokémon; Eevee has eight potential evolutions; Smeargle can copy nearly every move; Spinda has variable spot patterns; Castform's type changes to match the weather (except sandstorms for some odd reason); Kecleon's ability changes its type into the attack last used on it; Chatot interacts with the DS microphone; Deerling and Sawsbuck have different designs depending on the in-game season; and many more. Often, these gimmicks are all they have, though some are still capable fighters (like Eevee's evolutions and Sawsbuck).
  • Ramming Always Works: Tackle, Take Down, Double Edge, Head Charge, and Giga Impact, among others. Ramming is so iconic for being associated with Normal type attacks that the ultimate Normal type move (Breakneck Blitz) is itself basically a terrain-tearing Tackle in its animation.
  • Random Effect Spell: Metronome can select nearly any move in the series when used, while Assist is more controlled in that it will randomly select a move that one of the user's teammates know. Both of them cannot call certain moves, like themselves, Protect, or Counter.
  • Real Is Brown: Many of them have a brown or tan color scheme to make them look more like real animals.
  • Retcon:
    • Several previously Normal-type Pokémon and a few Normal-type moves became Fairy-type in Gen VI.
    • This also happened in Generation II, where Sand Attack, Bite, Karate Chop, and Gust, all Normal-type in Generation I, changed type.
  • Scissors Cuts Rock: Foresight and Odor Sleuth allow the user to hit Ghost-type Pokémon with Normal- and Fighting-type moves, which is normally impossible.
  • Shed Armor, Gain Speed: This is how Shell Smash works. Though it lowers the user's defenses, it also gives great boosts to Speed as well as both offenses.
  • Situational Damage Attack: Flail deals more damage the lower the user's HP is. At full HP, the power is a measly 20, but when the user has under 5% of their HP left, it becomes even stronger than Hyper Beam.
  • Spam Attack: Barrage, Comet Punch, Double Slap, Fury Attack, Fury Swipes, Spike Cannon, and Tail Slap hit 2-5 times when used, though each hit is pretty weak.
  • Spin to Deflect Stuff: The move Rapid Spin has the user spin at high speed to deal damage. It's actually really weak, but it has the useful property of removing Leech Seed, trapping moves that deal damage like Bind, and entry hazards like Spikes. This effect only works if the attack deals damage and the user doesn't faint from recoil, so a Ghost-type or damage from Rocky Helmet/Rough Skin/Iron Barbs can stop it.
  • Status Buff:
    • Swords Dance increases the user's Attack by 2 stages (a 100% additive increase).
    • Work Up and Growth increase Attack and Special Attack by 1 stage each (a 50% additive increase), with Growth doubling the boosts during Sunny Day or Drought.
    • Harden and Defense Curl increase Defense by 1 stage, with Defense Curl having the added bonus of doubling the power of Rollout and Ice Ball.
    • Howl and Sharpen increase Attack by 1 stage.
    • Accupressure randomly increases one stat by 2 stages.
    • Belly Drum maxes out attack (to 400%) at the cost of half the user's HP.
    • Double Team increases Evasion by 1 stage. It should be noted that Evasion and Accuracy modifiers work differently from other stat boosts.
    • Minimize increases Evasion by 2 stages, but also causes the user to always get hit by and take double damage from Stomp, Body Slam, Steamroller, Dragon Rush, Flying Press, and Phantom Force.
    • Shell Smash increases Attack, Special Attack, and Speed by 2 stages but decreases Defense and Special Defense by 1 stage.
    • Stockpile increases both Defense and Special Defense by 1 stage, but maxes out at 3 stages instead of 6 because of the move's interaction with Swallow and Spit Up.
    • Helping Hand increases the damage dealt by a partner Pokémon in Doubles/Triples by 50%.
  • Super Mode: Pidgeot, Kangaskhan, Lopunny, and Audino are capable of Mega Evolution.
  • Super Speed: Invoked with Quick Attack and Extreme Speed, which involve the user moving so fast they strike before other Pokémon normally would.
  • Switch-Out Move:
    • Roar and Whirlwind cause the target to switch out, but forces the user to move last.
    • Baton Pass causes the user to simply switch out. However, doing so will maintain the user's current status changes (positive and negative), non-permanent status conditions (like confusion), Substitutes, and the like. Switching out normally would remove those changes. It also allows the user to switch out if it is prevented from doing so by Mean Look or Shadow Tag, and it will not trigger Pursuit's special effect.
  • Useless Useful Spell:
  • Wave Motion Gun: The famous Hyper Beam manifests as a huge beam of energy.
  • You Will Not Evade Me: The moves Block and Mean Look prevent most opponents from escaping as long as the user remains in play. Only Ghost-types and Pokémon with certain abilities can escape.

    Fire 

Fire-Type / Flame-Type (ほのおタイプ hono'o taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fire_types.png

Pokémon with power over fire, lava, and all forms of heat. Most of them are Glass Cannons, but surprisingly, it has a lot of resistances (Bug, Grass, Ice, Steel, Fairy, and itself). Most Fire-Type moves are also capable of inflicting the Burn status, which causes damage while also halving the afflicted Pokémon's physical attack. Fire types are immune to the Burn status themselves, which is handy for the physical attackers among them. They are based on fantastical animals that can breathe fire, but there are a few, such as Magmar and Chandelure, which are more esoteric. Fire is also one of the three starter types.

They tend to live in particularly hot areas, like volcanoes, but as not every game has that kind of environment, they can be just as comfortable in caves or urban areas. Due to fire being one of the less naturally common elements, non-starter Fire-types tend to be rare and few in number.

Offensively, they are strong against Bug, Grass, Ice, and Steel, but weak against Dragon, Fire, Rock, and Water. Defensively, it's strong against Bug, Fire, Grass, Ice, Steel, and Fairy, but weak against Ground, Rock, and Water.


  • Attack! Attack! Attack!: There are only 2 Fire-type attacks that aren't offensive; Will-O-Wisp and Sunny Day. Even then, Will-O-Wisp inflicts damage over time, and Sunny Day raises the power of Fire-type moves.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Blast Burn is a Fire-type clone of Hyper Beam, meaning you're exposed to retaliation for 1 turn after using it (and you could do more damage by just using Flamethrower twice).
    • Fire Blast has better accuracy than Blizzard and Thunder, but it still has a very low PP count at 5 and thus is not very practical outside of battle facilities that heal your Pokémon after each battle.
    • Inferno always inflicts a burn when it hits and has high power, but only has 50% accuracy.
    • Burn Up has a base power of 130, but the user loses its Fire typing after using the move. Furthermore, it fails when used by a non-Fire-type Pokémon, so It Only Works Once.
  • Breath Weapon: Most of the attacks of this type are depicted as this; of course, some Fire-type Pokémonnote  have other methods of expelling fire.
  • Cast from Hit Points: Flare Blitz is a powerful move, but does damage to the user equal to 1/3 of the damage dealt to the target.
  • Color-Coded Elements: Fire is represented as an orange-red.
  • Counter Attack: Shell Trap, Turtonator's Secret Art, blows up opponents that hit Turtonator with a physical attack.
  • Dangerous Forbidden Technique:
    • Overheat deals incredible damage, but lowers the user's Special Attack by two stages each use, preventing them from hitting nearly as hard.
    • V-create is the third strongest move in the series that isn't a Z-move and the strongest one that isn't sacrificial, but each use lowers the user's defenses and Speed by one stage each.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Fire-type moves dealt Special damage.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: Eruption's Power is directly proportional to how much HP the user has left, doing a large 150 if the user is at full health. If you can keep the user healthy, it's far more useful than Fire Blast due to higher Power, 100% accuracy, and the ability to hit multiple opponents in Double and Triple Battles.
  • Elemental Punch: The moves Fire Punch and Blaze Kick. Fire Punch has slightly above-average power and wide distribution while Blaze Kick is a bit stronger and has a higher crit chance at the cost of some accuracy.
  • Elemental Rivalry: The obvious one would be Fire and Water, but there appears to be a lot of pairs of Fire types with Electric types. The Magmar and Electabuzz families and the Houndoom and Manectric families are version counterparts, there's a rivalry between Volkner and Flint in Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, and then there's Reshiram and Zekrom.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Bug, Grass, Ice, Steel
      • Weak: Dragon, Fire, Rock, Water
    • Defense
      • Strong: Bug, Fire, Grass, Ice (Gen II-Forward), Steel
      • Weak: Ground, Rock, Water
  • Fire/Ice/Lightning: A very popular motif seen frequently in the series — Ember, Powder Snow, Thunder Shock; Fire Punch, Ice Punch, Thunder Punch; Flamethrower, Ice Beam, Thunderbolt; Fire Blast, Blizzard, Thunder; Magmar, Jynx, Electabuzz; Articuno, Zapdos, Moltres; Reshiram, Zekrom, Kyurem; and so many more. There isn't much of an Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors usually seen with this kind of arrangement compared to other games — the only type in this triad that has an advantage over another is Fire over Ice.
  • Fire Is Red: Zig-Zagged. Several Fire attacks tend to be more realistically shaded, including blue flames for the more potent attacks, but most of the Pokémon themselves have red as their primary body color.
  • Flaming Hair: This design feature is popular among Fire-types, notably the Ponyta line and Infernape.
  • Glass Cannon: Fire has many common weaknesses and tends to be frail defensively, but hits a lot super effectively. Ironically, they have the highest number of resistances after Steel, at 6.
  • Goomba Stomp: Heat Crash, the Tepig line's signature move. It deals fire-type damage depending on how heavy the target is compared to the user.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: During Double and Triple Battles, Lava Plume hits everything but the user while Eruption, Heat Wave, and Incinerate only hit enemy Pokémon.
  • Kill It with Water: Almost all of them are weak to Water-type attacks. They can learn Sunny Day to reduce the damage taken from Water-type attacks.
  • Kryptonite Is Everywhere: The Fire type only has three weaknesses, but they're practically ubiquitous and counter it quite well. Good physical attackers of almost any type can learn Ground- and Rock-type attacks via TM, and most Fire-types have poor physical bulk with which to take these attacks. Meanwhile, Water is the most common type in the game, and most Fire-types will be stuck with the unwieldy Solar Beam when dealing with them. note 
  • Last Disc Magic: Fire Blast is usually available to buy as a TM late in the game or can be learned naturally by many Fire-types during the late- or post-game.
  • Light 'em Up: Diamond and Pearl gave a lot of Fire-Types access to Solar Beam, which gives them an attack to use against Water-, Rock-, and Ground-types.
  • Like Cannot Cut Like: Fire-type Pokémon resist Fire attacks.
  • Limit Break: The Fire-type Z-Move is Inferno Overdrive, a burst of fire which causes a massive and devastating explosion.
  • Magma Man: Invoked in certain magma-related attacks like Lava Plume and Eruption.
  • Mundane Utility: The Flame Body and Magma Armor abilities have the secondary effect of causing Pokémon Eggs to hatch in half the time they usually would, making Pokémon with these abilities incredibly useful for hatching lots of eggs quickly. The Slugma line notably have both of these abilites.
  • Playing with Fire: Naturally, the Fire-Type wields incendiary abilities.
  • The Power of the Sun: They get the move Sunny Day, which enhances their attacks by 50% and weakens Water-Type attacks by the same amount.
  • Required Secondary Powers: It's only natural that Fire Pokémon are immune to burn effects.
  • Ring of Fire: The move Fire Spin invokes this, as the target is both trapped (unable to flee or switch out) and progressively damaged over several turns. Heatran's signature Magma Storm is much the same, only with magma.
  • Secret Art:
    • The following abilities are exclusive to Fire-types:
      • Blaze increases the power of Fire moves when the user is at 1/3 or less health.
      • The Flame Body ability has a 30% chance to burn opponents who use physical contact attacks on the user. It also makes eggs hatch faster.
      • The Flash Fire Ability gives immunity to Fire and gives a boost to the user's Fire attacks by 50% if they are hit by one. It doesn't stack with itself
      • Magma Armor prevents the user from becoming Frozen. It also makes eggs hatch faster.
      • White Smoke prevents the user from having their status lowered by opponents, but doesn't prevent moves like Overheat from lowering the user's stats.
    • The following moves can only be learned by Fire-types:
      • Eruption's damage depends on the user's current HP, and taking damage will reduce the power.
      • Lava Plume hits all Pokémon around the user and has a good chance to inflict a burn.
      • Fire Pledge, exclusive to Fire-type starters and monkey, can be combined with Grass Pledge or Water Pledge to deal extra damage and create a special secondary effect.
      • Blast Burn, exclusive to final evolution of Fire-type starters, is a clone of Hyper Beam. It deals a large amount of damage, but forces to user to stay in the next turn to recharge.
      • Up to Eleven with Burn Up, where it can only be used if the user is a Fire-type, to the point that due to its side effect, it can only be used once until the user is switched out.
  • Standard Status Effect: Heavily associated with the Burn Status.
  • Status Buff: Flash Fire increases the power of the user's Fire-type moves by 50% when hit by a Fire-type move. Since it's not considered a stat boost like for Storm Drain and Lightning Rod, it doesn't stack with itself.
  • Super Mode: Charizard, Houndoom, Blaziken, and Camerupt are capable of Mega Evolution. Charizard has two Mega Evolutions. Groudon gains the Fire-type upon undergoing Primal Reversion.
  • There's No Kill Like Overkill: While almost impossible to set up, a Fire-type attack can reach a damage multiplier of x36.note 
    • In a similar vein, a Fire-type attack also has the lowest attainable non-zero multiplier, a pitiful 0.02065x.note 
  • Turns Red: Blaze boosts the power of Fire-type moves by 1.5x when the user is at 1/3 of their max health or less. It's exclusive to Fire-type starter Pokémon (and Pansear and Simisear).
  • Underground Monkey: The Alolan Marowak is part Fire-Type.
  • Useless Useful Spell: The ability Magma Armor makes the owner immune to being Frozen. Not only is getting Frozen incredibly rare due to each move that inflicts it only having a 10% chance to do so, using a Fire-type attack when Frozen will thaw out the user, so it's not debilitating anyway.
  • Whip It Good: Fire Lash, Heatmor's signature move, strikes at the foe using a burning lash.
  • Wreathed in Flames: Invoked with the Fire-type exclusive ability, Flame Body. Also used for some physical Fire-type moves.

    Water 

Water-Type (みずタイプ mizu taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/water_types.png

With 70 percent of the Earth covered by it, it isn't difficult to imagine that Water Pokémon are the most common type. It is one of the two types has been paired with every existing type at least once (tie with Flying). Most Water-types are based on aquatic animals, both marine and fresh water, and is one of the three stater types. They can be found on every aquatic route, and some of the more amphibious types can be found in wetlands. They can also be fished out using various fishing rods.

Offensively, they are strong against Fire, Rock, and Ground, but are resisted by Grass, Dragon, and other Water-types. Defensively, they resist Fire, Ice, and Steel and are only weak to Electric- and Grass-types (but most Grass-types don't want to hang around them willingly), making them pretty hard to wear down.


  • Action Initiative: Aqua Jet. Water Shuriken, despite being a multi-hit move, has boosted priority as well.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: Hydro Cannon is a Water-type clone of Hyper Beam, meaning that your opponent will have a free turn to wash you up after you use it. (Also, you could do more damage by slamming Surf, so... yeah. Don't use it unless you like losing.)
  • Battle in the Rain: Rain Dance summons a rainstorm that rages on for several turns of battle and empowers Water moves, as well as causing several other effects (such as giving 100% accuracy to Thunder and Hurricane). The abilities Drizzle and Primordial Sea are automatic versions that activate as soon as the user enters battle.
  • Breath Weapon: A weird one in that the water they use is often depicted as coming from their mouths in most adaptations.
  • Bubble Gun: The moves Bubble and its big sister Bubble Beam, both of which cause damage in addition to possibly lowering the target's speed.
  • Com Mons: They serve as the main encounters on aquatic routes, though they aren't exceptionally powerful. Tentacool in particular are very common in the seas of Kanto, Johto, Hoenn and Alola.
  • Color-Coded Elements: Water Is Blue, as are most Water-types' color schemes.
  • Coup de Grâce: Brine deals double damage to targets who have less than half their health left.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Water-type moves dealt Special damage. And even after the split, you only see very few physical Electric moves (some are relegated as unique moves for legendaries) and users. Either they are weak, or are strong but have recoil.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: Water Spout's Power is directly proportional to how much HP the user has left, doing a large 150 if the user is at full health. If you can keep the user healthy, it's far more useful than Hydro Pump due to higher Power, 100% accuracy, and the ability to hit multiple opponents in Double and Triple Battles.
  • Elemental Baggage: Brine? Dive? Muddy Water? Surf? Waterfall? Whirlpool? Doesn't matter, your Pokémon can always summon enough water from nowhere to enable these moves, even if you're fighting in the middle of the desert or at the edge of space!
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Fire, Ground, Rock
      • Weak: Dragon, Grass, Water
    • Defense
      • Strong: Fire, Ice, Steel, Water
      • Weak: Electric, Grass
  • Fake Balance:
    • Within the Starter Power Trio; not only does Water have the least number of weaknessesnote  and types that resist itnote , meaning that they can easily beat Grass-types despite the type disadvantage thanks to their access to Ice-type attacks, and Electric-types (their only other weakness) due to them not resisting Water attacks and their Glass Cannon tendencies.
    • The weather condition related to the Water type, rain, is far superior to the other weather conditions. Intense sunlight powers up Fire-type moves, but the Abilities powered up by intense sunlight are usually given to Grass-types, which are roasted even harder by the powered-up Fire moves. Rock- and Ground-types might enjoy having their weaknesses to Water being reduced, but in turn they risk taking a no-charge Solar Beam. Sandstorm's powering-up Abilities, Sand Force and Sand Rush, are mutually exclusive and not innate boosts. Rain gives a boost to Water-type attacks and its Abilities are granted to mostly Water-types, who make extremely good use of them.
  • Flying Seafood Special: Practically all Water-types based on fish just seem to float in midair when battling on land, except, as of Gen VI, Magikarp, who just flops around helplessly.
  • Giant Wall of Watery Doom: Surf, ubiquitous both as a mandatory field move and as a potent and reliable attack, involves the user surfing toward the opponent. On a huge crest of ocean water. Muddy Water is also depicted as this.
  • Grimy Water: The move Muddy Water uses Surf's animation, but with the water a sickly brown instead of blue. It has a chance to lower the target's accuracy, an effect borrowed from the Ground-type's wheelhouse.
  • Healing Spring: Aqua Ring confers a Leftovers effect, healing the user 1/16 of its max HP at the end of each turn.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: Bubble, Muddy Water, Water Spout, and Origin Pulse hit all enemy Pokémon, while Surf and Sparkling Aria hit everyone but the usernote .
  • Ice Magic Is Water: Every Water-Type (except Magikarp, Rotom Wash, and Pyukumuku) has access to an Ice-Type attack (usually from Technical Machines or Move Tutors), giving them a chance at beating Grass-types and Dragon-types.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Water is useful offensively and defensively, and most Water types are capable of serving as any of the competitive archetypes.
  • Last Disc Magic: Hydro Pump isn't a TM like Fire Blast, Thunder, or Blizzard, but can be learned naturally by many Water-types during the late- or post-game.
  • Like Cannot Cut Like: Water moves do not do much against Water-types.
  • Limit Break: The Water-type Z-Move is Hydro Vortex, a powerful Mega Maelstrom, and while the foe is trapped in it the attacker rams into them repeatedly.
  • Logical Weakness: It has been noted several times in the anime that Water-types are weak against Electric-types because water is conductive to electricity. note 
  • Making a Splash: Naturally, the Water-Type's arsenal revolves around all things water-based, mostly focusing on moving around large quantities of water, shooting streams of water (sometimes heated) and bubbles at your opponent and traveling around in the element itself.
  • Mega Maelstrom: Hydro Vortex pulls the enemy under and unleashes one of these.
  • Rain Dance: A Water-type move that makes it rain. See Battle in the Rain above.
  • Required Secondary Powers: As explained above, nearly all water Pokémon will have some variation of an ice attack.
  • Sea Monster: Many of the more powerful Water-types have a place in in-game lore as these, especially Gyarados, a vicious sea serpent whose rages can lay whole coastal cities to waste; Wishiwashi, an individually small and weak fish that can school in large groups to take the form of a giant, powerful, and widely feared monster; and Kyogre, a massive leviathan and the primordial god of the sea.
  • Secret Art:
    • The ability Drizzle gives an instant Rain Dance effect when the user switches into battle if there is no weather or another weather in play. It lasts for 5 turns unless the user is holding a Damp Rock, in which case it lasts 8 turns. If Rain is already active, it does not reset or stack with the current turn limit. Prior to X and Y, the effect was permanent unless it was overridden by another weather activating.
    • Primal Kyogre has an enhanced version of Drizzle called Primordial Sea. It has the same Water-boosting effects, cannot be overridden by normal weather abilities or weather moves (only Desolate Land and Delta Stream), and makes it so all Fire-type moves except for Will-O-Wisp will always fail. Unlike Drizzle, it will not persist when the owner switches out or if it is supressed by Gastro Acid.
    • The ability Mega Launcher increases the power of Aura Sphere, Dark Pulse, Water Pulse, Dragon Pulse, and Heal Pulse by 50%.note 
    • The ability Torrent increases the power of Water moves by 50% when the user is at 1/3 or less HP.
    • The move Scald deals a decent amount of damage while having a 30% chance to inflict the target with a Burn.
    • Water Pledge and Hydro Cannon, which are special moves only tutorable to Water-type starter Pokémon.
    • The move Water Spout deals damage depending on the percentage of the user's current HP, with a higher percentage meaning higher damage.
    • The ability Water Veil makes the owner immune to burns.
    • The ability Water Bubble not only makes the owner immune to burns, it also reduces Fire-type damage by half, and doubles the power of the user's Water-type attacks.
  • Simple, yet Awesome: Surf has no additional effects in battle aside from hitting everything around the user and all it does is attack with a giant wave of water. But, it's vital for getting around and is strong enough that it's actually a legitimately good move, unlike other Hidden Machines.
    • Waterfall is another Water-type Hidden Machine, and it's every bit as useful as Surf. While Surf is the more powerful move, Waterfall has a chance to cause flinching, and it's decently powerful and runs off the Attack stat, making it a common option for physical attackers like Gyarados.
    • Scald is a decently powerful Water-type move with 100% accuracy and also has a 30% chance of inflicting the burn status, which deals damage over time and halves the afflicted Pokémon's attack. It's been a TM since its debut in Gen V, which was also the generation that TMs first became usable repeatedly. Because of this, it's pretty much assumed that any Pokémon that can have Scald probably will, especially if it uses its Special Attack stat for attacking. Scald also has the nice ability to thaw out the user when used, though it will also thaw a frozen target.
  • Spam Attack: Water Shuriken hits the target 2-5 times on each use, with each hit dealing weak damage.
  • Status Buff:
    • Withdraw increases the user's defense by 1 stage.
    • Swift Swim doubles the user's speed during Rain.
    • Storm Drain gives immunity to Water attacks and increases the user's Special Attack by 1 stage whenever hit by one. In a Double or Triple Battle, single-target Water-type moves used by an opponent or ally will be forced to target the Pokémon with Storm Drain.
  • Super Mode: Blastoise, Slowbro, Gyarados, Swampert, and Sharpedo are capable of Mega Evolution. Kyogre can undergo Primal Reversion to become Primal Kyogre. Greninja is capable of transforming into Ash-Greninja if it has the Battle Bond ability.
  • Stone Wall: Water types are often lauded with being one of the best defensive typings in the game. They only have two weakness and have four resistances. On top of that, quite a few Water-types also favors high HP and Defensive Stats, but their speed tend to be fairly low.
  • Truth in Television: Scald has a 30% chance to burn, which is higher than most Fire-type moves. There's a reason for that: water and steam transfer heat by direct contact instead of by radiation, making hot water and steam burns more painful (and sometimes fatal) than the common burns you get when you touch something hot, like a flame or a hot stovetop. Water also has a very high specific heat, which means the particles of steam carry huge amounts of damaging energy.
  • Turns Red: Torrent boosts the power of Water-type moves when the user is at low health. It's exclusive to Water-type starter Pokémon, Panpour, and Simipour.

    Grass 

Grass-Type (くさタイプ kusa taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/grass_types.png

Grass-type Pokémon is a misnomer. The type is associated with all plant life, autotrophic protista, even heterotrophic crinoids and fungi. They tend to be Mighty Glaciers, strong and sturdy like a tree, but slow to move, though there are several outliers, such as Jumpluff, Sceptile, Whimsicott, and Kartana, who are particularly speedy. It is one of the three starter types. As the name implies, they can generally be encountered wherever tall grass is found, but a few, like Cacturne and Abomasnow, can be found in places that seem inhospitable to plant life, proving their resilience.

Grass-types can be difficult to use effectively in battle, as they are heavily disadvantaged in many different ways. They have FIVE weaknesses (Fire, Flying, Ice, Poison, and Bug), their attacks are resisted by seven types (Fire, Flying, Poison, Bug, Grass, Dragon, and Steel), and their movepools tend to be poor, with many Grass-types lacking options other than Grass, Normal, and other attacks/moves from their secondary types. Despite this, they are good at spreading around status effects and passive damage through Leech Seed and the like. Grass types are also good at blocking such status effects themselves, as they're immune to powder moves and Leech Seed. Lastly, their positive defensive matchups can still be relied upon, as Grass is one of only three types to take less-than-neutral damage from Ground and Electric — and, as exemplified in the starter type triangle, also resists the ubiquitous Water type, although its access to Ice moves makes handling Water-types themselves much riskier than taking a Water-type move.


  • Always Accurate Attack: Magical Leaf bypasses accuracy and evasion checks when it's used.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Solar Beam and Solar Blade are strong attacks, but they have a charge turn that telegraphs what you are doing to your opponent. Averted in Sunny weather where the charge turn is negated, but played straighter in Rain, Sandstorms, Hail or Strong Winds, which halve their power.
    • Frenzy Plant is a Grass-type clone of Hyper Beam, which means you're a sitting duck after using it. Also, you can do more damage by spamming Energy Ball.
  • Bullet Seed: The Trope Namer. It's an attack which shoots seeds at the opponent to hit 2-5 times.
  • Cast from Hit Points: Wood Hammer does damage to the user equal to 1/3 of how much it deals to the target.
  • Charged Attack: Solar Beam and Solar Blade require a turn to gather sunlight before the attack executes on the second turn. If the weather is sunny, however, the charge turn is not required.
  • Color-Coded Elements: Grass-typing is represented as Green, and many Grass-types are varying shades of green and yellow.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Grass-type moves were Special.
  • Dangerous Forbidden Technique: Leaf Storm deals heavy damage to the target, but lowers the Special Attack of the user by two stages. Serperior is well-known for its Contrary ability, which raises its stats after using the move instead of lowering them.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors:
    • Offense
      • Strong: Ground, Rock, Water
      • Weak: Bug, Dragon, Fire, Flying, Grass, Poison, Steel
    • Defense
      • Strong: Electric, Grass, Ground, Water
      • Weak: Bug, Fire, Flying, Ice, Poison
  • Energy Ball: An attack of this name is under the Grass type. The flavor text describes the attack drawing its power from nature, which could explain the Grass-type (and the attack animation in Generation VI has little leaf particles). Oddly, it's often found in Bug, Psychic, and Ghost-types' movepools.
  • Fantastic Flora: Just going by its attacks, the Grass-type includes plants whose seeds can plant themselves into other beings to cause insomnia or leeches way health (Worry Seed and Leech Seed), and spores that can induce sleep and paralysis (Spore and Stun Spore).
  • Garden Garment: Bellossom and Lilligant both have the appearance of wearing dresses fashioned out of petals, while Leavanny, Roselia, and Roserade have a leaf-based "cape".
  • Green Thumb: Naturally, the Grass-Type specializes in plant-related combat.
  • Heal Thyself:
    • The Morelull line's signature move, Strength Sap, heals the user by the same amount of HP as the target's Attack stat, as well as lowering the target's Attack by one stage.
    • The move Synthesis immediately restores half the user's HP. Like several other Grass-type moves, it's more effective in sunny weather.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: Razor Leaf hits all opponents, while Petal Blizzard hits everyone but the user.
  • Kryptonite Is Everywhere: Grass-types have the most weaknesses of all types, at five (tied with Rock), and their attacks are resisted by seven types (tied with Bug). Several Grass Pokémon, like Exeggcute, Exeggutor, Celebi, Snover, and Abomasnow, are notorious for having the most weaknesses of any Pokémon at six normal weaknesses and one double weakness each. Come Generation VI, we can add Grass/Dark-types Nuzleaf, Shiftry, and Cacturne to the list.
  • Life Drain: Several Grass moves, like Absorb and Mega Drain, deal damage while healing the user for 50% of the damage dealt. Leech Seed acts as a sort of continuous Life Drain.
  • Like Cannot Cut Like: Grass moves do half damage against Grass-types. Leech Seed will also only fail on opposing Grass types.
  • Light 'em Up: The move Solar Beam is a beam of charged sunlight.
  • Limit Break: The Grass-type Z-Move is Bloom Doom; after the Pokémon turns the area into a flowery meadow, it releases a devastating flower explosion.
  • Logical Weakness: Grass' resistance towards Electric is explained in Tree's a Crowd, as Grass-types diffuse electricity into the trees or ground.
  • Mushroom Man: Though not plants, mushrooms are always associated with the Grass-type in this franchise. In terms of actual humanoid fungi, there are Amoonguss, a hopping toadstool with a face on its stem and a sort pair of arms ending in smaller mushroom caps, and Shiinotic, a diminutive humanoid with sort legs, thin and spindly arms and fingers and a broad purple cap growing from its had. They evolve from more borderline examples of this trope that put more emphasis on "mushroom" than "man", Foongus — much like Amoonguss, but with only a pair of fingerless arms for limbs — and Morelull — an ambulatory cluster of hyphae with eyes and three mushrooms sprouting from its top.
  • Petal Power: Petal Dance and Petal Blizzard are damage-dealing moves presented as their user buffeting its target with a flurry of razor-sharp petals.
  • Planimal: By definition, any Pokémon that has the Grass type must be at least part plant (or fungus), and as such most Grass-types that aren't outright Plant Persons or Nature Spirits of some sort will end up being this. Exactly how this works can vary: in some cases the Pokémon is a "normal" animal in symbiosis with a plant or fungus (like the Paras line and their parasitic mushroom, or the Bulbasaur line, whose plant the Pokédex describes as growing from a seed planted in their back at birth). Others, like Sawsbuck, simply appear to be individual creatures with characteristics of both plants and animals.
  • Poisonous Person: Many have a secondary Poison-typing (especially in Gen I) and usually have access to Poison attacks.
  • The Power of the Sun: Just like real plants, some Grass-type abilities involve sunlight, like Synthesis, Solar Beam, and the abilities Chlorophyll and Leaf Guard.
  • Secret Art:
    • Chlorophyll doubles the user's Speed in sunny weather.
    • Effect Spore has a 30% chance of inflicting paralysis, sleep, or poisoning on Pokémon that make contact with the possessor of the Ability. All Pokémon who have this Ability as a standard Ability are mushroom-based.
    • Harvest has a 50% chance of recreating a consumed berry each turn (100% chance during sunny weather).
    • Leaf Guard makes the user immune to Standard Status Effects during sunny weather.
    • Overgrow increases the power of Grass moves when the user is at 1/3 or less health.
    • Leech Seed deals percentage-based Life Drain damage to the opponent until the seeds are removed by Rapid Spin or switching out.
    • Grass Pledge and Frenzy Plant, which are special moves only tutorable to Grass-type starter Pokémon.
    • Spore makes the target fall asleep, but unlike most sleep-inducing moves, it has 100% accuracy. Others have much worse accuracy. Only mushroom-based Pokémon can learn this.
    • Forest's Curse is a move that gives a Pokémon the Grass type on top of their existing typings, which given Grass's many weaknesses usually is advantageous. Kyurem in particular has 10 weaknesses when afflicted with Forest's Curse, while the combinations Ground/Flying, Ground/Dragon, Dragon/Flying, Ice/Steel, Bug/Steel, Bug/Fighting, and Dark/Psychic each gain an 8x weakness (Ice/Bug would as well, but no Pokémon with that type combination exist at this time).
    • Grassy Terrain creates a Geo Effect which gives all Pokémon on the ground Regenerating Health and increases the power of their Grass-type moves.
  • Situational Damage Attack: Grass Knot's Power is dependent on the target's weight. For the lightest of targets, it's a pathetic 20, but for the heaviest, it's a very strong 120.
  • Spam Attack: Bullet Seed hits the opponent with a barrage of 2-5 weak hits on each use.
  • Stealth Pun: Leaf Blade. It's often depicted as a blade of green energy in the anime, but in the games it's a green slash. But it's a blade used by Grass-type Pokemon. It's a literal blade of grass.
  • Support Party Member: Although their offensive and defensive matchups are a little shaky, Grass-types tend to get many support/utility moves like Poisonpowder, Sleep Powder, Stun Spore, Spore, Leech Seed, Aromatherapy, and such, while also soaking up the first five.
  • Super Mode: Venusaur, Sceptile, and Abomasnow are capable of Mega Evolution.
  • Turns Red: Overgrow boosts the power of Grass-type moves when the user is at 1/3 of their total health or lower. It's exclusive to Grass-type starter Pokémon (and Pansage and Simisage).
  • Useless Useful Spell: Petal Blizzard is tied with Leaf Blade as the strongest physical Grass-type move without any downsides, and even hits multiple opponents in Double, Triple, and Horde Battles. Everything capable of learning it has below-average Attack at best, making it largely worthless.
  • Weak to Fire: As part of the core Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors, Grass-type starters always maintain a weakness to the fire type (when not counting Mega Sceptile, who is Grass/Dragon and is thus neutral to Fire).

    Electric 

Electric-Type (でんきタイプ denki taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/electric_types.png

Electric-types are known for their ability to control electricity. Most of them are known for extraordinary speed stats. They are also capable of inflicting the paralysis status (though this ability isn't exclusive to electric type moves). Paralysis cuts the affected Pokémon's speed, and there's also a chance that it can't move at all. Electric types are immune to Paralysis themselves. A lot of them are electricity-generating animals, but a number of machines are among the ranks. Electric rodents appear to be particularly common.

Offensively, it is effective against two of the most common types in the game (Water and Flying), while it is resisted by Grass-types, Dragon-types, and other Electric-types, with Ground-types being immune. Defensively, it resists Flying, Steel, and itself, and is only weak to Ground. To balance this, most Electric-types have weak defenses.

They mostly make their homes in urban regions, but some take up residence in caves and forests, the latter most memorably being where Pikachu are found.


  • All Webbed Up: Electroweb, which inflicts damage while lowering the target's Speed stat.
  • Always Accurate Attack: Shock Wave bypasses accuracy and evasion checks when used. Thunder confers the same effect during Rain, with the added bonus of hitting the target when they're in the middle of using Fly, Bounce, or Sky Drop.
  • Armor-Piercing Attack: In Diamond and Pearl, Thunder had a 30% chance to bypass Protect during Rain due to a glitch.
  • Anti-Air: One of the few types that are effective against Flying-types. Thunder bypasses the target's semi-invulnerable phase when they are using Fly, Bounce or Sky Drop.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Thunder is the strongest widespread Electric attack in the game, but it has a less-than-perfect accuracy of 70%. Averted during Rain when its accuracy is perfect, but played straighter in sunny weather, which reduces its accuracy to 50%.
    • Zap Cannon is tied with Volt Tackle as the strongest Electric move that's available to non-Legendaries and always inflicts Paralysis on its target, but its accuracy is worse than Thunder's at 50%.
  • Boring, but Practical: Thunderbolt isn't the flashiest or strongest Electric attack, but it has above-average power (90 as of Gen VI) and 100% accuracy.
  • Cast from Hit Points: Wild Charge and Volt Tackle deal damage to the user equal to a fraction of the damage they deal to their targets; 1/4 and 1/3, respectively.
  • Chain Lightning: Discharge and Parabolic Charge damage all adjacent Pokémon in Double and Triple battles.
  • Color-Coded Elements: The Electric-type icon is Yellow, as is a majority of Electric-types themselves.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Electric moves were Special.
  • Elemental Rivalry: There appear to be a lot of pairs of Electric types with Fire types. See Fire-types for examples.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors:
    • Offense
      • Strong: Flying, Water
      • Weak: Dragon, Electric, Grass
      • Can't Hit: Ground
    • Defense
      • Strong: Electric, Flying, Steel
      • Weak: Ground
  • Fragile Speedster: They tend to have above-average or high Speed, but are not very durable. In Gen VI, they even gain immunity to paralysis, which would otherwise terribly slow them down.
  • Harmless Electrocution:
    • In Real Life, electrocution can be extremely dangerous or even fatal. In-game, the worst it'll ever do is cause a Pokémon to faint.
    • Electrify (the Secret Art of Helioptile and Heliolisk) causes the target's next attack to register Electric damage, with the flavor being that the user of Electrify was able to infuse the target with electricity without actually harming them at all. Ion Deluge is a somewhat less effective version, as it only converts Normal-type moves, but it's available to more than one evolutionary line.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: Electroweb hits all opponents, while Discharge and Parabolic Charge hit everyone but the user.
  • Improvised Lightning Rod: The ability Lightning Rod draws all Electric moves toward the user, confers immunity to those moves if they don't already have it, and gives a free boost to Special Attack each time they are hit by them (unless they're a Ground-type). It's mostly Electric-types themselves who have this ability, but a few Ground-types gain it as well (such as Rhydon). It's also possessed by Mega Sceptile (its tail acts as the lightning rod), and most notably, one pair of Water Pokémon (Goldeen and Seaking — it's the horn that acts as the makeshift lightning rod).
  • Kid-Appeal Character: Every generation has an Electric-type rodent with generally low stats, meant to replicate the appeal of Pikachu.
  • Last Disc Magic: Thunder is usually available to buy as a TM late in the game or can be learned naturally by many Electric-types during the late- or post-game.
  • Like Cannot Cut Like: Electric-types resist themselves.
  • Limit Break: The Electric-type Z-Move is Gigavolt Havoc, a spear-like bolt of devastating lightning.
  • One Of These Is Not Like The Others: Eelektross, unlike the other Electric types, is slow and bulky. It also has Levitate, meaning it is immune from its only weakness unless its ability is nullified (like holding Iron Ball, being affected by Gravity, being affected by Gastro Acid, or being targeted by a Pokémon with Mold Breaker, Turboblaze or Teravolt).
  • Poor, Predictable Rock: Their movepools are often shallow for the most part, with only the obligatory Normal and STAB moves. They'll get some attacks like Signal Beam from Move Tutors if they're lucky, but that's pretty much it.
  • Powerful, but Inaccurate: Zap Cannon is one of the strongest Electric-type moves and will always inflict paralysis if it hits, but it only has 50% accuracy.
  • Recurring Element: In each Generation, there's always at least one Electric-type rodent that has a design similar to Pikachu.
  • Secret Art:
    • The ability Static inflicts Paralysis 30% of the time to opponents that use contact moves on the user.
    • The ability Motor Drive makes the user immune to Electric attacks and increases their Speed by 1 stage whenever hit by one.
    • The ability Volt Absorb also gives immunity to Electric attacks and heals the user by 25% of their max HP when hit by one.
    • The move Electro Ball is a move that deals more damage the faster the user is compared to the target.
    • The move Volt Tackle is exclusive to the Pikachu line and has high power at the cost of dealing damage to the user.
    • The move Electric Terrain is a field move that lasts for 5 turns (8 if the user holds a Terrain Extender). It prevents grounded Pokémon from falling asleep and increases the power of Electric moves used by grounded Pokémon by 50%.
    • The move Nuzzle is a very weak attack learned only by the Pikachu line and its Kid-Appealing successors, but it will always inflict Paralysis on the target.
    • The move Parabolic Charge is somewhat weak, but hits all opponents in Double, Triple, and Horde Battles and has a Life Drain effect.
  • Shock and Awe: The Electric-type's specialty, of course.
  • Situational Damage Attack: Electro Ball's damage is dependent on the difference between the user's and target's Speed; the faster the user is than the target, the more damage it will do.
  • Standard Status Effects: Most Electric attacks have a 10%-30% chance to paralyze the target, which lowers their speed by 50% and causes them to lose a turn from being "fully paralyzed" 25% of the time. The move Thunder Wave inflicts it 90% of the time without doing damage, while Nuzzle and Zap Cannon inflict damage in addition to always causing it (though Zap Cannon has 50% accuracy).
    • Since Generation VI, Electric-types are now immune to paralysis themselves.
  • Static Electricity: The ability Static adds a chance of causing paralysis every time the owner is hit by a physical move and increases the chances of finding Electric-type Pokémon in the wild.
  • Status Buff:
    • Charge doubles the power of the next Electric-type attack used and increases the user's Special Defense by 1 stage.
    • Magnetic Flux raises the Defense and Special Defense of all allies with the Plus or Minus abilities.
    • Plus and Minus give a 50% Special Attack increase when an ally on the field with either ability is present. This isn't considered a stat boost, meaning this stacks on a multiplier instead of additively with stat bonuses from Status Buff moves like Nasty Plot.
    • Lightning Rod increases the user's Special Attack by 1 stage whenever they are hit with an Electric-type attack, unless they are already immune to Electric.
  • Super Mode: Ampharos and Manectric are capable of Mega Evolution.
  • Switch-Out Move: Volt Switch, which inflicts damage before forcing the user to switch out. The user won't switch out if the target is immune to the move.
  • Underground Monkey: The Alolan Geodude and its evolved forms are part Electric-Type.
  • Useless Useful Spell: Most of the Electric Pokémon that learn Electro Ball aren't that fast to begin with.note 
  • Wonder Twin Powers: The Plus and Minus abilities, originally exclusive to Doubles-gimmicky Plusle and Minun and made available to a few other Electric types as a Hidden Ability, increase their wielders' Special Attack stats when paired together. As of Gen V, they also activate when paired with themselves.
  • Yellow Lightning, Blue Lightning: Electric attacks typically have a yellow coloration (although blue has not been unheard of), while the Pokémon themselves also tend to be yellow or blue.
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    Ice 

Ice-Type (こおりタイプ ko'ori taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tumblr_inline_mta510shid1r9lhsj.png

Pokémon with the ability to control ice, snow, and/or cold temperatures in some manner. A lot of them are based on arctic animals, animals found in cold water, or personifications of snow and ice. Many Ice moves can inflict the very debilitating Freeze status, which renders the victim virtually immobile (unless you are lucky enough for it to thaw out). Ice types are hardy enough to be immune to Freezing themselves, and as of Generation VII, Sheer Cold. Ice is typically one of the harder types to find, as they only reside in colder areas. They also tend to appear late in the game, and Ice-type specialists are either among the last two Gym Leaders fought in the region or a member of the Elite Four. Ice is the rarest type as of Generation VII.

Ice has a tenuous status on the type chart. While Ice-type attacks are strong against many Pokémon (Grass, Flying, Ground, and Dragon, but are resisted by Water, Ice, Fire, and Steel), their defensive capabilities are much worse. Ice-type Pokémon only resist Ice-type attacks, and have a lot of weaknesses (Rock, Fighting, Fire, and Steel); because of this, many players choose to teach Ice attacks to Water Pokémon instead, which have better defensive matchups. Using Ice-types effectively requires great strategy and planning.

When a hailstorm is in effect, Ice-Type Pokémon take no residual damage from it.


  • Action Initiative: Ice Shard, as an Ice-type iteration of Quick Attack, will let the user move first.
  • Always Accurate Attack: Blizzard will bypass accuracy and evasion checks during Hail.
  • An Ice Person: Predictably, the Ice-type's abilities are all cryogenic in nature.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Blizzard is the strongest widespread Ice attack, but has iffy accuracy at 70%. Averted in Hail, where it always hits.
    • The Kyurem formes' Secret Arts, Freeze Shock and Ice Burn, have a charge turn that telegraph what you're doing to your opponent.
  • Charged Attack: Ice Burn and Freeze Shock require a turn to charge before inflicting heavy damage.
  • Color-Coded Elements: Ice-types are represented by light-blue, and many Ice-types share the colorization.
  • Damage Typing: Always dealt Special damage prior to Diamond and Pearl.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: If you're going to be training Ice-types, you really need to know what you're doing in order to compensate for the type's numerous defensive weaknesses. There are also very few Ice-types to choose from, and good Ice-types are even fewer. Played right, Ice-types can shatter the competition with ease.
  • The Dragonslayer: Before Fairy came along, Ice was the type for nailing Dragons. It was Dragon's only weakness outside itself, and up until Generation V, most fully-evolved Dragon-types had a double weakness to Ice.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Dragon, Flying, Grass, Ground
      • Weak: Fire (Gen II-Forward), Ice, Steel, Water
    • Defense
      • Strong: Ice
      • Weak: Fighting, Fire, Rock, Steel
  • Fake Balance: The primary advantage that Ice has is being one of two types prior to Gen VI that Dragon was weak to (the other is Dragon itself). Unfortunately, most Dragons are capable of learning Fire attacks and most Water types can learn an Ice type attack and not suffer from a type disadvantage against Dragons. Then Gen VI came along and introduced Fairy types, giving another reason to not use Ice, since they are immune to Dragon.
    • One of the major problems with Ice is that while its type match-ups suggest offensive Glass Cannon builds, the majority of Ice-type Pokémon are built defensive and slow, as this article explains.
  • Freeze Ray: The bread-and-butter Ice attack, Ice Beam.
  • Hair-Trigger Avalanche: The move Avalanche doubles in power if the user has been attacked already in that turn, capturing this trope's flavor of an avalanche being something specifically provoked by the victim, as opposed to other natural disasters. In later games, the user's attacking animation evokes this trope even further, appearing to be screaming, depending on the species.
  • Harmless Freezing: In Real Life, exposure to extreme cold and freezing temperatures has a high risk of inflicting frostbite. Here, the worst it can do is make you unable to attack for the rest of the battle. That said, there's no way to freeze opponents without damaging them first...
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: Blizzard, Glaciate, Icy Wind and Powder Snow hit both opponents in Doubles.
  • Human Snowball: Ice Ball, as the user deliberately encasing itself in ice before mowing down the opponent. Oddly enough, the anime contradicts this by making it a projectile attack.
  • Kill It with Ice: Their approach to battle, naturally — bombard the opponent with snow storms, ice, and blasts of chilling wind to defeat them.
  • Ice Magic Is Water: In Generation I, Ice-type moves actually dealt normal damage to Fire-type Pokemon rather than resisted, which the part-Flying Charizard and Moltres didn't appreciate. Additionally, some Water-types are part-Ice, and can learn Ice-type moves.
  • Late Character Syndrome: Due to most ice and snow themed places being set later in the game then other places, Ice-typed Pokémon have a tendency to be ignored since most players would have their in-game team already in place. They also tend to evolve at higher levels the other types, the earliest being Smoochum at level 30.
  • Last Disc Magic:
    • Blizzard is usually available to buy as a TM late in the game or can be learned naturally by many Ice-types during the late- or post-game.
    • In Pokémon X and Y, Ice Beam is the final TM you receive from the Gym Leaders. In other games in which there's an Ice-type Gym Leader (who also gives away an Ice-type TM), s/he is the seventh out of eight.
    • Pokémon Sun and Moon effectively turns the entire type into this. You don't get access to the area where nearly all Ice-type Pokémon live (and the Z-Crystal) until you're ready to challenge the Elite Four, and the only Ice TMs available before you reach the final island are Hail and Aurora Veil, neither of which are direct attacks.
    • Finally averted in Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon, where Seaward Cave, an optional early area in Sun and Moon, became both mandatory and colder. Smoochum and Delibird are both part of the walking encounter table, and returning with Lapras Surf, itself obtained fairly early on the second island, will net you the Frost Breath TM and a chance at catching a Seel.
  • Light 'em Up: Aurora Beam, a weaker cousin to Ice Beam (though with a different effect), involves a beam of rainbow-colored light.
  • Like Cannot Cut Like: The only type Ice Pokémon resist against is themselves.
  • Limit Break: The Ice-type Z-Move is Subzero Slammer, in which the user drastically drops the temperature and freezes the target inside a massive ice crystal which proceeds to shatter, inflicting great damage.
  • Luck-Based Mission: Wanna see a Frozen Pokémon? Good luck, since there's no move that guarantees that it will be inflicted like the other Standard Status Effects (accuracy aside) and the highest chance of it happening normally is 10% (the move Secret Power has a 30% chance of freezing, but only when used in the few-and-far between icy areas). This is likely to restrict what is arguably the most crippling status condition in the game; without items, the frozen Pokemon is completely helpless unless the equally low 10% chance of it thawing out of the ice occurs. And in Gen I, their only hope of defrosting without items is getting hit with a Fire-type move or if the opponent used Haze, otherwise they're completely hosed.
  • Mighty Glacier: Puns aside, many Ice-types have great offensive power and decent defenses but poor speed. Avalugg and Regice are literal takes on this trope, being Mighty Glaciers (Avalugg is physical-oriented, Regice is special-oriented) that are also actual animated glaciers.
  • Nerf: In the original Red and Green, Blizzard had a 30% chance to Freeze and 90% accuracy, and any Frozen Pokémon would stay Frozen permanently (unless you had a Ice Heal, Full Heal, or Full Restore, which you couldn't use in Player Versus Player matches, or the opponent used Haze or a damaging Fire-type move except for Fire Spin). International releases reduced the chance to 10%, and Gen II onwards changed Blizzard's accuracy to 70%, made it so that a Frozen Pokémon has a 10% chance to cure itself every turn (even the same turn it was Frozen), introduced moves that could be used while Frozen that would also thaw out the user, and prevents Freeze from being inflicted during Sunny Day. Contrary to popular belief however, if a frozen Pokémon is sent out during harsh sunlight, it will not thaw out faster.
  • Obvious Rule Patch: Generation VI nerfed critical hits to do 1.5x damage instead of 2x. To account for this, the power of Frost Breath (and its counterpart Storm Throw) was adjusted from 40 to 60, which actually still makes it somewhat more powerful than before when factoring the crit in.
  • One-Hit KO: Sheer Cold can instantly knock out the opponent, with an accuracy of 30% if the user and target are at equal levels. It's also the only move of this type that no Pokémon has an immunity to via Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors, until Generation VII where Ice-types are immune to it. Shedinja is also immune to it because of Wonder Guard.
  • Required Secondary Powers: They're immune to being frozen and resist their own attacks.
  • Scissors Cuts Rock: Normally, Ice-type attacks aren't very effective on Water-types, but the Secret Art Freeze Dry is super effective on them as a special property.
  • Secret Art:
    • The ability Ice Body heals the owner for 1/16 of their total HP at the end of each turn during Hail.
    • The ability Snow Cloak boosts Evasion by 1 stage during Hail.
    • The ability Slush Rush doubles the owner's speed during Hail.
    • The ability Snow Warning gives an instant Hail effect when the user switches into battle if there is no weather or another weather in play. It lasts for 5 turns unless the user is holding an Icy Rock, in which case it lasts 8 turns. If Hail is already active, it does not reset or stack with the current turn limit. Prior to X and Y, the effect was permanent unless it was overridden by another weather activating.
    • The ability Refrigerate turns Normal-type moves into Ice-type moves and grants a 20% damage bonus in addition to STAB (30% in Gen VI).
    • The move Frost Breath always inflicts a Critical Hit, unless the target has the ability Battle/Shell Armor or is under the effect of Lucky Chant.
    • The move Freeze-Dry hits Water-types super effectively.
    • The move Aurora Veil creates a barrier that reduces damage from both physical and special moves, but it can only be used during a hailstorm.
  • Spam Attack: Icicle Spear hits the target 2-5 times on each use. Cloyster can notably hit a target with this move 5 times due to having Skill Link as a possible ability.
  • Standard Status Effects: Associated with the Freeze status, with many of their attacks having a 10% chance to inflict it(notably, there is no non-damaging move that inflicts Freeze, ala Toxic, Thunder Wave, or Will-O-Wisp). Ice-types themselves cannot be frozen (unless it's done by Tri Attack in Generation II).
  • Status-Buff Dispel: Haze is under this type, despite its animation being a thick cloud of black smoke. Mist inverts it by preventing stats from being lowered.
  • Super Mode: Glalie and Abomasnow are capable of Mega Evolution.
  • Underground Monkey: Alolan Vulpix, Alolan Sandshrew and their evolved forms are Ice-Types.
  • Weak to Fire: Fire resists and is super-effective against Ice types; however, this is averted by the large sum of part-Water Ice Pokémon, the four part-Rock types, and Kyurem.

    Fighting 

Fighting-Type (かくとうタイプ kakutou taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fighting_types.png

Fighting-types tend to represent various styles of martial artists, but with the twist that these fighters have their skills as a natural ability, rather than as a discipline. They can be found in caves, honing their discipline against the tough Rock-types, and occasionally in urban areas, likely a result of their discipline making them easily domesticated. They can be useful in construction.

Originally, Fighting-types weren't very useful in Gen I when Psychic-types ruled the proverbial roost. With the introduction of both Dark- and Steel-types, both of which were weak to Fighting-types, their usability shot up dramatically, and they are now one of the major attacking types alongside Ground and Rock. Fighting-type attacks are super-effective on Normal, Rock, Ice, and the aforementioned Dark and Steel types, but are resisted by Bug, Poison, Flying, Psychic, and Fairy-types and completely ignored by Ghosts. Fighting-types are also useful defensively against Rock, Bug, and Dark attacks, but take double damage from Flying, Psychic, and Fairy moves.


  • Action Initiative:
    • The physical Mach Punch and the special Vacuum Wave have priority, letting the user go before the opponent more often than not.
    • Inverted with Vital Throw, Revenge, Counter, Focus Punch, and Circle Throw, which all have negative priority, causing the user to go last most of the time.
  • Always Accurate Attack: Aura Sphere and Vital Throw bypass accuracy and evasion checks. They can still fail if the opponent is in the middle of using a move like Fly, as it removes them from the field.
  • Armor-Piercing Attack: Sacred Sword ignores changes in the target's Defense and Evasion.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Focus Blast is a very powerful special attack that can be taught to many Pokémon, but is unreliable due to having 70% accuracy and has a low Power Point count.
    • Dynamic Punch will always confuse the opponent when it hits and has high power, but has 50% accuracy. Averted if used by a Machamp or Golurk with the ability No Guard, since the ability makes everything an Always Accurate Attack, even if the opponent are outside of the field after using Dig or Fly.
    • Flying Press is the only dual-type attack in the game, being a Fighting and Flying attack. However, some types that are weak to Fighting resist Flying and vice-versa, meaning that it will usually only hit for neutral damage. Plus, there are few Pokémon weak to both Flying and Fighting-type attacks, so end result is basically a Fighting-type move that really hurts Grass and Fighting-types, but doesn't work on Rock and Steel-types.
  • Badass Normal: Most Fighting-types don't have very many elemental or supernatural powers compared to most Pokémon, but their strength is excellent.
  • Bare-Fisted Monk: In general, the Fighting-type is used to represent this sort of fighting style in the Pokémon series. Most Fighting-types use no form of weapon, but they can punch hard enough to smash Steel-, Rock-, and Ice-types. Several Fighting-types can have the ability Iron Fist, which powers up their punching attacks.
  • Barrier-Busting Blow: Brick Break removes Reflect and Light Screen from the opponent's side of the field before doing damage, unless they are a Ghost-type.
  • Blood Knight: Well, they don't particularly care for killing, but generally-speaking they're certainly one of the most eager types to enter combat.
  • Boring, but Practical: Fighting-Types lack the flashy attacks of the other types and variety in their moves, all of them being just different variations of punches and kicks, but their raw strength and technique is so good that they really don't need to do anything else.
  • Brick Break: The Trope Namer. It has average power, but it also has the useful properties of shattering Light Screen and Reflect.
  • Cast from Hit Points:
    • Submission deals damage to the user equal to 1/4 of the damage dealt to the target.
    • Final Gambit causes the user to faint, but deals damage equal to the value of their HP when it was used.
  • Charged Attack: Focus Punch plays with this. It charges during the turn it is used and is executed at the end of it (making it the only charged attack that is anywhere near practical without a Power Herb), but requires the user to not take any damage for the attack to succeed.
  • Charles Atlas Superpower: Most of them are described as having Super Strength and toughness from sheer training.
  • Close-Range Combatant: The majority of Fighting-types attack by getting up close and attacking with their fists.
  • Color-Coded Elements: The Fighting-type icon is reddish brown. Some Fighting-types are likewise colored.
  • Counter Attack: The appropriately-named Counter deals twice the damage the user takes from Physical attacks to the opponent. It doesn't work on Ghost-types or if the user doesn't take physical damage.
  • Critical Hit Class:
    • Cross Chop has an increased chance to land a Critical Hit.
    • Storm Throw will always land a Critical Hit when it's used, but has only average power.
  • Damage Typing:
    • Always dealt Physical damage prior to Diamond and Pearl.
    • Played with for Secret Sword. The move is a Special attack and can be countered by Mirror Coat, but calculates damage using the target's Defense stat instead of Special Defense.
  • Dangerous Forbidden Technique:
    • Close Combat and Superpower are as powerful as Fire Blast, Blizzard, and Thunder without the accuracy issues, but they lower the user's statsnote  each time they're used. For Superpower, this is averted if used by Malamar with Contrary, in which case it raises the user's Attack and Defense.
    • Hammer Arm is as powerful as Earthquake, but it lowers the user's Speed each time it's used and has a small chance to miss.
  • Death-or-Glory Attack: Jump Kick and High Jump Kick deal massive damage, but missing or having the attack blocked/nullified causes heavy damage to the user (a portion of the damage it would've done in Gens I-IV; half of the user's max HP from Gen V and on).
  • Defend Command:
    • Detect acts like the move Protect and defends the user from most attacks. Attempting to use it consecutively will decrease the chance of it succeeding by half.
    • Quick Guard protects the user and their allies from Priority attacks and is designed for Double and Triple Battles.
    • Mat Block protects the user and their allies from attack moves, but can only be used the first turn the user is in battle. Like Quick Guard, it's designed for Double and Triple Battles.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: Focus Punch has 150 Power and 100% accuracy, but if the user takes direct damage when using it, they lose focus and can't move. Since the move is decreased priority (and beginning to focus has increased priority), the Pokémon using Focus Punch is likely to get hit and not be able to use the move, unless they're up against an opponent who is very fond of status moves. It's possible to work around this, like having a Substitute to sponge an attack (a broken Substitute doesn't count as getting hit), inflicting Sleep on a target before using it, or using it when the opponent doesn't attack. Double and Triple Battles also add the possibility of a speedy partner with After You or Follow Me.
  • Dumb Muscle: The implicit reason for their weakness to Psychics; Fighting-types fail in contests of the mind, and most of them have poor Special Attack. Ironically, Fighting-types can be Genius Bruisers as far as their knowledge of martial arts and physical training go; they just aren't that good with other subjects, implying they're more Book Dumb than outright stupid. This is averted (but reinforced) with Gallade, Meditite, and Medicham, who are equally disciplined in the mind due to their additional Psychic typing. By and large, most Fighting-Types are more or less, just as intelligent as any other Pokémon.
  • Elemental Punch: As long as they have arms, they usually can be taught Fire Punch, Ice Punch, and Thunder Punch.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Dark, Ice, Normal, Rock, Steel
      • Weak: Bug, Fairy, Flying, Poison, Psychic
      • Can't Hit: Ghost
    • Defense
      • Strong: Bug, Dark, Rock
      • Weak: Fairy, Flying, Psychic
  • Fixed Damage Attack:
  • Force and Finesse: Makuhita/Hariyama and Meditite/Medicham were the only primary Fighting-types introduced in Gen III (although a few other Pokémon carried a secondary Fighting typing) and make a good pair, with Hariyama's sumo origin and slow, bulky style of mighty slaps and punches contrasted against Medicham's yogini influence and evasive, dance-like movements bolstered by psychic prediction. Most other Fighting-types lean toward the Force aspect, although there are some notable exceptions like Mienfoo/Mienshao.
  • Genius Bruiser: While Fighting-Type Pokémon in earlier generations displayed Dumb Muscle characteristics, later ones appear to lean towards this: For example, Conkeldurr developed the ability to produce concrete and taught to humans while older Hariyama are said to teach younger Makuhita how to properly train in sumo.
  • Glass Cannon: The majority of Fighting-types have very good attack stats. Their defenses tend to run the gamut between bulky and frail, depending on what type of fighting style they are based on, but they lean towards frail overall.
  • Honor Before Reason: The implicit reason for their advantage against Dark-types. This is further backed up by the ability Justified (Heart of Justice in Japanese), which increases Attack when hit by a Dark-type Pokemon.
  • Humanoid Aliens: In terms of both body shape and fighting style, most Fighting-types are the most similar to humans. There are a few that explicitly aren't, such as the Swords of Justice (who resemble ungulates).
  • Human Hammer-Throw: There are a handful of Fighting moves that involve bodily throwing the target, including Circle Throw, Seismic Toss, Storm Throw, and Vital Throw.
  • Ki Manipulation: The moves Aura Sphere and Focus Blast are energy-based Fighting-type moves.
  • Last Disc Magic:
  • Life Drain: Drain Punch inflicts damage and heals back 50% of the damage it inflicted.
  • Limit Break: The Fighting-type Z-Move is All-Out Pummeling, in which the user rams an energy orb into the target after some Rapid-Fire Fisticuffs.
  • Magically Inept Fighter: A huge number of Fighting-types have high attack but low Special Attack, and most Fighting-type moves are physical to go with their high attack.
  • Mutual Disadvantage: Towards Bug-types, where they resist each other's attacks.
  • No-Holds-Barred Beatdown: In Gens IV and V, Close Combat is depicted as multiple fists pummeling the target. However, the move is also learnable by several quadrupeds (like Growlithe, Arcanine, and the Swords of Justice) and a bird of prey (Staraptor), so it can just as easily involve kicks, beaks, or whatever else the user has to pummel the opponent with.
  • The Paralyzer: The move Force Palm can inflict Paralysis 30% of the time.
  • Power of the Void: Believe it or not, this shows up in a certain Fighting move, Vacuum Wave, though not many Pokémon can make good use of it since it's a special move (most Fighting-types are oriented toward physical attacks) and it has a direct physical counterpart in Mach Punch.
  • Rated M for Manly: Fighting is definitely the most masculine type. Most Fighting-types look tough, muscular, and quite masculine, and their preferred combat style is certainly manly. In addition, most Fighting-types are either male-only or have gender ratios in favor of males. This trope extends to the trainers who frequently use them, who tend to be tough martial artists (even the females).
  • Rapid-Fire Fisticuffs: Close Combat is depicted as a barrage of kicks and punches. Some Pokédex entries imply that Fighting-types can do that naturally, such as Machamp and Hitmonchan. The ultimate Fighting type attack, the Z-Move called All Out Pummeling takes this to the extreme of having dozens of fists knock the opponent into a mountainside.
  • Situational Damage Attack:
    • The Power of Low Kick is dependent on the target's weight. For opponents weighing less than 10 kg, it's a measly 20, but for anyone weighing equal to or greater than 200 kg, it's a very strong 120.
    • Revenge normally has an okay Power of 60, but that will double if the user took damage on the same turn it was used.
    • Reversal's Power is dependent on how much HP the user has left; the lower the value, the more damage it deals. At max HP, it's a very weak 20, but at less than 5%, it maxes out at 200.
  • Spam Attack: Arm Thrust hits the opponent 2-5 times on each use.
  • Spinning Piledriver: The move Submission.
  • Status Buff: Bulk Up increases the user's Attack and Defense by 1 stage each.
  • Strong Flesh, Weak Steel: They are strong against the Steel-type despite mostly being made of flesh.
  • Suicide Attack: Final Gambit causes the user to faint but inflicts an amount of damage equal to the user's current HP. Sadly, it's prevented for qualifying for Taking You with Me by mostly being given to Pokémon with laughably low HP (including the One-Hit-Point Wonder Shedinja).
  • Super Mode: Heracross, Blaziken, Medicham, Lucario, and Gallade are capable of Mega Evolution. Mega Mewtwo X and Lopunny gain the Fighting-type upon Mega Evolving.
  • Super Toughness: They resist Rock-type attacks.
  • Switch-Out Move: Circle Throw goes last, but forces the target to switch when it hits, unless they are immune to the move.
  • Training from Hell: Many of them go through a self-inflicted form of this. Sawk secludes itself in the mountains and trains without sleeping, Machoke lifts vehicles to train its muscles, Medicham fasts and meditates daily to develop its mental powers, and Poliwrath swims the width of the Pacific Ocean.
  • Useless Useful Spell:
    • Vacuum Wave was until the 7th generation the only Special priority attack in the series, but almost every Pokémon that learns it has horrible Special Attack. Infernape, Lucario, and Toxicroak are the only ones that can actually deal respectable damage with it since they have passable Special Attack and a Status Buff to increase it further.
    • Prior to Gen IV, most Fighting-types with the elemental punches were fairly useless because those attacks all ran off the (usually) low Special Attack stat.

    Poison 

Poison-Type (どくタイプ doku taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/poison_types.png

These vile Pokémon have powers of venom, toxins, and poisons. Their specialty is harassing the enemy with status effects and residual damage. Most Poison-types are based on poisonous or venomous creatures, though some resemble inanimate objects such as trash bags and piles of sludge. They are mostly found in urban areas and forests, with the infamous Zubat family residing in caves.

The status associated with them is Poison and Bad Poison. Both effects cause the afflicted Pokémon to lose health at the end of the turn, but Bad Poison is especially nasty because it inflicts steadily increasing amounts of damage — 1/16th of its max HP, which increases to 1/8 to 3/16 to 1/4, and so on. The moves Toxic and Poison Fang can inflict the latter status, as can Toxic Spikes if it is stacked, and if a Poison-type Pokémon uses Toxic in Generation VI and beyond, it has absolutely perfect accuracy, hitting even if the target uses Fly or Dig. Poison Types cannot be Poisoned themselves.

Their offensive capabilities are not spectacular, though, as they are strong against only two types, Grass and Fairy, and are resisted by four types (Rock, Ground, Poison, and Ghost) and nullified by one (Steel). Despite this, they still have a few powerhouses. Their defensive abilities, however, are a bit better, resisting five types (Grass, Bug, Fighting, Poison, and Fairy) while being only weak to two, namely Psychic and Ground (although those two are fairly common...).

Poison is the only type to have no dedicated Legendary or Mythical Pokémon, aside from Arceus holding a Toxic Plate or Poisonium Z. If one counts Ultra Beasts as being Legendaries, however, then Nihilego, Poipole, and Naganadel would stand as Poison Legendaries.

Originally, Poison was the most common type in the game, narrowly edging out the ubiquitous Water type in Generation I. However, it hasn't been terribly common since; Generations II-VII combined have introduced exactly as many Poison-types as Generation I alone.


  • All Webbed Up: Toxic Thread lowers the target's Speed by 1 stage and poisons it.
  • Always Accurate Attack: As of X and Y, if a Poison-type uses Toxic, it will always hit the target regardless of accuracy/evasion modifiers and can even hit targets during the semi-invulnerable period provided by moves like Fly and Dig. Clear Smog also bypasses accuracy and evasion checks, as it's meant to remove stat changes and it would be difficult to do so if it can't hit the target.
  • Always Chaotic Evil: While wild Poison types are just as neutral as any other wild Pokémon, they are usually the first choice of villainous teams, showing up most frequently at the command of Team Skull in the Alola region.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: Belch is a strong special attack that actually has good accuracy for its power, but requires that the user consume a berry before it can be used and is mostly only learned by Pokémon with low Special Attack.
  • Balance Buff: Poison was once the worst offensive type in the game. It only did super-effective damage to one other type (Grass), which plenty of other types did anyway; on the flip-side, several types resisted Poison. Gen VI added Fairies, giving Poison another type it could be effective against. Unrelated to this, Toxic now never misses if the user is a Poison-type.
  • Caltrops: The move Toxic Spikes lays poisoned caltrops that inflict poison on anything that switches in. Adding a second layer upgrades the effect to bad poison.
  • Color-Coded Elements: Poison-types are associated with purple, leading to an aversion of Purple Is Powerful.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Not to the same extent as Dark, but definitely a prominent feature. Poison-type features include poisoning the opponent through various methods and lowering their stats through acidic poisons.
  • Combos: Can use Toxic to poison an opponent, then use Venoshock to deal extra damage to the poisoned target, or Venom Drench, which lowers the Attack, Special Attack, and Speed by 1 stage each of a poisoned opponent. If the user has Merciless, its attacks on a poisoned target will be guaranteed Critical Hits (barring Shell/Battle Armor or Lucky Chant).
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, Poison attacks dealt Physical damage.
  • Deadly Gas: A key concept behind Koffing/Weezing, iconic Pokémon of their type, as well as the moves Poison Gas, Smog, and Clear Smog.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Bug (Gen I Only), Fairy, Grass
      • Weak: Ghost, Ground, Poison, Rock
      • Can't Hit: Steel
    • Defense
      • Strong: Bug (Gen II-Forward), Fairy, Fighting, Grass, Poison
      • Weak: Bug (Gen I Only), Ground, Psychic
  • Feed It with Fire: In a slightly unusual sense of the trope, Poison types are not only immune to poisoning, but can also remove any number of layers of Toxic Spikes on entry.
  • Gasshole: Belch, a powerful move introduced in Generation VI that requires the user to have consumed a berry during the battle to be used.
  • Gradual Grinder: They are excellent at residual damage and status effects. Many Poison-types also have high HP (Muk, Garbodor, Swalot, Amoonguss etc.), Defense (Weezing, Toxapex), or Special Defense stats (Nihilego, Venusaur, Tentacruel, Toxapex again).
  • Gonk: In general, Poison-types look more monstrous than most other Pokémon, being based on gasbags, slime monsters, literal garbage, and various poisonous animals, including snakes and insects. Not many Poison-types could be called beautiful or even cute, though some qualify for Ugly Cute.
  • Heal Thyself: Purify is a move that removes the target's status condition, and if successful, it also heals the user's HP by up to 50%.
    • Pokémon with the Poison Heal ability will heal 1/8th of their max HP per turn making this the only time Poisoning would give a healing factor instead of reducing hit points.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: Acid and Poison Gas hit all opponents, while Sludge Wave hits everyone but the user.
  • Limit Break: The Poison-type Z-Move is Acid Downpour, in which the user creates a poisonous swamp and sinks the target into it.
  • Like Cannot Cut Like: Poison moves won't do much against Poison Pokémon, and Poison-types are immune to the status condition.
  • Mooks: The most common type (along with Dark) to be used by the bad guys. Note that, as they are the servants of Mooks themselves, this effectively makes them Mooks squared.
  • Mutual Disadvantage: In Gen 1, they are mutually weak against Bug-types. Not anymore in Gen 2 as Poison-types resists Bug attacks, while Bug-types take neutral damage from Poison attacks.
  • Poison Is Corrosive: The moves Acid and Acid Spray deal damage without inflicting poison; instead, they lower the target's Special Defense (Acid has a 10% chance of doing so while Acid Spray always lowers Special Defense by 2). Despite this, they still don't affect Steel-types. The Ability Corrosion allows the user to poison Steel-types via Poison Gas or Toxic, but it doesn't allow any Poison-type attacks to damage them.
  • Poison Is Evil: Not really, but villainous teams such as Team Rocket are fond of using them. Several leaders of villainous teams often include a Poison-type or two on their team, including Giovanni's Nidoking and Nidoqueen, Maxie's, Archie's, and Cyrus's Crobat, Ghetsis's Drapion and Toxicroak (Black 2 and White 2 only), Plumeria's Salazzle and Guzma's Ariados. Lusamine is heavily associated with Nihilego, but does not use one in battle.
  • Poisonous Person: Toxins, and corrosives, and fumes!
  • Power Nullifier: The move Gastro Acid suppresses the target's ability (unless it's Multitype, Stance Change, Schooling, Comatose, Shields Down, Disguise, RKS System, Battle Bond, or Power Construct) as long as they remain in battle.
  • Secret Art:
    • The Ability Liquid Ooze causes any Life Drain effect used against the owner to inflict damage on the opponent instead of healing them.
    • Stench decreases the chances of Random Encounters if the user is in the head of the party and gives a free 10% flinch chance to all the user's attacks in battle. This effect does not stack when holding a King's Rock or Razor Fang.
    • Toxic's guaranteed-to-hit effect only applies if a Poison-type uses the move.
    • Corrosion allows the user to poison Steel-types as well as other Poison-types via Poison Gas or Toxic. It still will not allow Poison-type attacks to damage Steel-types, however. If the user is holding a Toxic Orb, it becomes the only time a Poison-type can poison itself as well.
    • Merciless causes a Pokemon's attacks to become guaranteed Critical Hitsnote - but only if the target is poisoned.
  • Situational Damage Attack: Venoshock normally has slightly below-average Power of 65, but if the target is Poisoned, the power doubles to a high 130.
  • Situational Sword: Venom Drench lowers the target's Attack, Special Attack, and Speed by one stage each, but will only work if the target is Poisoned.
  • Standard Status Effects: Mainly associated with the Poison status, which comes in two flavours: Standard poisoning deals fixed damage over time, while bad poisoning deals a small amount that grows larger each turn.
  • Status Buff: Coil increases Attack, Defense, and Accuracy by 1 stage each while Acid Armor increases Defense by 2 stages.
  • Status-Buff Dispel: The move Clear Smog removes all stat changes when it deals damage.
  • Stone Wall: The type itself leans toward this, given its poor attacking versatility but high number of resistances, though in practice the Mons themselves run the entire spectrum of stat distributions.
  • Super Mode: Venusaur, Beedrill, and Gengar are capable of Mega Evolution.
  • Technicolor Toxin: Purple, in this case.
  • Trap Master: The Toxic Spikes move creates a field effect on the opponent's side, causing their Pokémon to be poisoned when they switch in (badly poisoned if a second layer is set). Steel-types, airborne Pokémon, and other Poison-types (who remove Toxic Spikes when they switch in, unless they are flying/levitating) are unaffected.
  • Universal Poison: Despite the kind of toxicity varying between species, they all inflict the same kind of Poison (or Toxic Poison) as their Standard Status Effect.
  • Walking Wasteland: A number are said to cause pollution and decaying plants just by their presence. Grimer and its evolution Muk are particularly awful about this:
    "Just one drop of this Pokémon's body fluid can turn a pool stagnant and rancid."
    "A toxic fluid seeps from its body. The fluid instantly kills plants and trees on contact."
    "Wherever Grimer has passed, so many germs are left behind that no plants will ever grow again."
  • Weak, but Skilled: Not very good in terms of stats, but very effective with status effects and grinding.

    Ground 

Ground-Type (じめんタイプ jimen taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ground_types.png

These Pokémon are associated with the Earth. As such, these Pokémon are often based on underground or desert-dwelling creatures, and their attacks usually involve sand or using the Earth itself. They are most famous for the move Earthquake, a strong and reliable attack that is a must-have on a team. Ground types make their homes in caves and desert regions. Their greatest advantage is over Electric-types, as Ground-types are immune to Electric-type attacks.

Ground is tied with Fighting for being super-effective against the most types - Fire, Rock, Electric, Poison, and Steel. However, with a type this strong, there are many ways to be immune to it: the Flying type, the Levitate ability, the Air Balloon item, and the moves Magnet Rise and Telekinesis all can render a Pokémon immune to Ground. It's also resisted by Bug and Grass. Defensively, Ground resists Poison and Rock and is immune to Electric, but is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice.

If a sandstorm is raging, Ground-type Pokémon take no residual damage from it.


  • Anti-Air: Normally, Ground-type attacks are ineffective against Flying-types. The one exception is Zygarde's Secret Art Thousand Arrows, which not only can hit Flying-Types, but will also bring them down to the ground and remove any immunity to Ground-type moves the target may have. It can even bypass the semi-invulnerable phase from Bounce, Fly, or Sky Drop.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Downplayed with Dig. It gives invulnerability to most attacks for one turn, but said turn is also a charge turn that telegraphs what you are doing to your opponent, so you must think ahead when you use it, lest you become a sitting duck when you emerge and/or find yourself fruitlessly attacking a Flying-type or Levitator.
    • Magnitude can hit as hard as Hyper Beam without the recharge turn side-effect, but only if the Random Number God likes you. If it doesn't, have fun tickling the opponent to death.
  • Caltrops: The move Spikes lays some at the opponent's feet, causing damage whenever a Pokémon on their side switches in. It's even called "Caltrop" in Japan.
  • Chunky Updraft: The graphic for Zygarde's signature move, Land's Wrath, depicts dirt and rocks rising around it.
  • Color-Coded Elements: Ground-types are often tan or light brown, and their elemental icon is the same.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Ground moves dealt Physical damage.
  • Dishing Out Dirt: More literal dirt than Rock-types. They can learn plenty of Rock-type moves, though.
  • Disney Villain Death: The Ground move Fissure entails opening up a chasm in the earth for the target to plummet into, causing an instant KO. No deaths in Pokémon battles, of course, but Fissure is the closest the franchise comes to invoking this trope.
  • Dummied Out: Zygarde 100%'s two Secret Arts, Thousand Arrows and Thousand Waves, are both present in Generation VI games and can be called by Metronome, but nothing actually learns them until Generation VII.
  • Earthquakes Cause Fissures: Woe betide you if your Pokémon gets hit with the instant-knockout move Fissure.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Electric, Fire, Poison, Rock, Steel
      • Weak: Bug, Grass
      • Can't Hit: Flying
    • Defense
      • Strong: Poison, Rock
      • Weak: Grass, Ice, Water
      • Immune: Electric
  • Fast Tunnelling: Almost all Ground-types can learn the move Dig, and plenty of other Pokémon as well, until it lost its TM status in Sun and Moon.
  • Ground Pound: It can be inferred that this is why Magnitude and Earthquake are physical moves, not special: the Pokémon isn't summoning elemental power to vibrate the ground, but actually striking it with a punch or full-body blow. Most anime depictions bear this reading out. (Contrast the special move Earth Power.)
  • A Handful for an Eye: One of the more infamous moves of the early game is Sand Attack, which lowers the target's accuracy. The moves Mud-Slap and Mud Bomb can accomplish this as well while actually causing damage, unlike Sand Attack.
  • Heal Thyself: Shore Up heals the user's HP, normally by 1/2 but 2/3 if there's a sandstorm.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: Land's Wrath, Thousand Arrows, Thousand Waves and Precipice Blades hit all opponents while Bulldoze, Earthquake, and Magnitude hit everyone but the user.
  • Kill It with Ice: Most Ground-types are weak to Ice.
  • Kill It with Water: One of their biggest weaknesses is the Water type.
  • Last Disc Magic: The TM for Earthquake is usually found very late in the game, often in Victory Road. Like Close Combat for Fighting-types, however, several Pokémon learn the move in the mid-30s, giving them a very powerful attack early on.
  • Limit Break: The Ground-type Z-Move is Tectonic Rage, in which the user forces the target deeper and deeper underground until the heat and pressure create an explosion of energy.
  • Living Statues: A couple of Ground-types (such as the Claydol and Golurk lines) are artificial lifeforms made of clay or other sedimentary material.
  • Mighty Glacier: Though not as much as Rock, Ground-types aren't known for being fast, but make up for it with Attack.
  • One-Hit KO: Fissure creates a massive pit in the ground and drops the target into it to knock it out instantly.
  • Power Nullifier: The type is immune to Electric-type moves, while the Thousand Arrows move nullifies Flying-types' and Pokémon with Levitate's immunity to Ground-type moves.
  • Randomized Damage Attack: Magnitude randomly selects a Magnitude ranging from 4 (10 base damage) to 10 (150 base damage).
  • Scissors Cuts Rock: One of Zygarde's signature moves, Thousand Arrows, is a strong Ground-type move that not only hits normally immune Flying-types or Pokémon with Levitate but also knocks them to the ground, leaving them vulnerable to other Ground-type attacks.
  • Secret Art: Arena Trap prevents all grounded (read: those without an Air Balloon, Levitate, or part Flying-type) opponents from switching out or fleeing.
  • Shockwave Stomp: The move Bulldoze is described as a strike against the ground that sends a shockwave of energy to lower the speed of all targets who are hit.
  • Simple, yet Awesome: Earthquake. All it does is cause the ground to shake strongly and has no additional effects aside from hitting Pokémon around the user in Double and Triple Battles. It has high power, can be taught to a ton of Pokémon via TM, and makes for a great coverage option due to the amount of types Ground hits super effectively while having zero drawbacks when used in Singles, the most used battle format during the story.
  • Spam Attack: Bone Rush hits the target 2-5 times per use, with each hit being a weak attack. Bonemerang will always hit 2 times, but has rather average power.
  • Status Buff: Rototiller increases the Attack and Special Attack of all Grass-types on the field by 1 stage. This does include the opponent's side.
  • Super Mode: Steelix, Swampert, Camerupt, and Garchomp are capable of Mega Evolution. Groudon can undergo Primal Reversion to become Primal Groudon.
  • Theme Naming: A number have "don" somewhere in their names, as it manages to incorporate the Japanese character 土 do (meaning "ground"). Rhydon, Donphan, Groudon, Hippowdon...
  • This Is a Drill: The move Drill Run, a powerful spinning move used by drill-based and spinning Pokémon (like Excadrill).
  • Trap Master: Spikes creates a field effect on the opponent's side that causes their Pokémon to take damage whenever they switch in unless they're immune to Ground. The effect can have up to three layers; the first cause them to lose 12.5% of their max health upon switching in, the second layer 16.67%, and the last layer 25%.

    Flying 

Flying-Type (ひこうタイプ hikou taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/flying_types.png

These Pokémon soar through the skies with grace. Some of them don't, but they have similar abilities. Flying-type Pokémon are usually based on birds and other avian creatures, but quite a few are based on other fliers: dragons, mammals, insects, and even seedlings, balloons, and rockets. There are a wide variety of Pokémon represented by this type; it is one of the two types has been paired with every existing type at least once (tie with Water). They're diverse and adaptive enough that Flying-types are found in almost every conceivable environment imaginable, save for the ocean floor. The majority of them are dual-type Pokémon (as, prior to Generation V, there was no such thing as a pure-Flying type or a Pokémon with Flying as a primary type), and have Flying as their second type. Generations V and VI introduced three exceptions: Tornadus (pure Flying), and Noibat and Noivern (Flying/Dragon). Flying is the third most common type.

Offensively, they are strong against Grass, Bug, and Fighting, and are resisted by Electric, Steel, and Rock. Defensively, they resist Fighting, Bug, Grass, and are immune to Ground, but are weak against Rock, Electric, and Ice.

In Triple Battles, Flying-type attacks can hit a target regardless of their placement, except for Air Cutter, which hits more than one Pokémon instead.

Flying-types are also useful for their ability to learn Fly, which takes the trainer to important locations like towns and cities. There are a few Pokémon that are not Flying-type yet can learn the move, though.


  • Airborne Mook: When they're encountered as enemies.
  • Air Jousting: Gen VI introduced Sky Battles, ostensibly reserved exclusively for Flying-types and those with Levitate (though in fact, it really comes down to whether or not the Pokémon's animation depicts them in midair, and a number of Flying-types are excluded, especially lesser evolutions who are depicted as roosting on the ground, such as Pidgey).
  • Always Accurate Attack: Aerial Ace bypasses accuracy and evasion checks when used. Hurricane will also do so during Rain, with the added bonus of hitting opponents when they are in the middle of using Fly, Bounce, or Sky Drop.
  • Anti-Air: Roost is self-healing move that also removes the Flying type from the user if it has that type.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Downplayed with Bounce and Fly. They give invulnerability to most attacks for one turn, but said turn is a charge turn that telegraphs what you are doing to your opponent, so you must think carefully before using them. Sky Attack does the same thing, but is more powerful and without the invulnerability part. Sky Drop works around the main issue by grabbing the target on the first turn so they can't be switched out, although it's hilariously easy to negate in Rotation Battles, does no damage whatsoever to Pokémon that would be immune to Ground-type moves, and fails entirely on Pokémon above a certain weight threshold.
    • Hurricane is a powerful attack that has a decent chance of causing confusion, but has shaky accuracy at 70%. Averted in Rain since it bypasses accuracy and evasion checks.
  • Blow You Away: As Pokémon lacks a Wind type, Flying is the type that uses many of the wind-based attacks like Gust, Air Slash, Air Cutter, Hurricane, and Tailwind.
  • Cast from Hit Points: Brave Bird deals damage to the user equal to 1/3 of the damage dealt to the target.
  • Charged Attack:
    • Sky Attack charges for one turn, and then inflicts damage on the second.
    • Beak Blast, Toucannon's signature move, charges up at the start of the turn and inflicts damage at the end, just like Focus Punch. Unlike Focus Punch, it can't be stopped by attacking the user; trying it is a bad idea, as anyone that makes contact with the user while it's in the process of charging up is burned.
  • Clip Its Wings: Flying-types are vulnerable to this from the move Smack Down, which, in addition to causing supereffective damage (it's a Rock-type move), negates the Flying Pokémon's resistance to Ground moves. Zygarde's Secret Art Thousand Arrows has the same effect.
  • Color-Coded Elements: The Flying-type color is light blue, verging on periwinkle (in contrast to Ice's cyan). However, most Flying-types, being based on birds, tend to incorporate white, brown, tan, and red into their designs.
  • Com Mons: They're some of the first Pokémon a trainer will encounter, and a lot of them are Normal-typed, too.
  • Confusion Fu: Owing to the type's diverse nature, Flying-types can fill all kinds of roles, many of which aren't the same. Will that Flying-type be a special attacker, physical attacker, mixed attacker, wall, or supporter? What kind of attacks will it throw at you? You won't know unless you have a general idea of what tricks they like to use.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Flying-type moves dealt Physical damage.
  • Dangerous Forbidden Technique: Dragon Ascent, Rayquaza's signature move, is an incredibly powerful move that triggers its Mega Evolution, but each use lowers the user's defenses.
  • Dub-Induced Plot Hole: Despite its name, Aerial Ace can be learned by pretty much anything with claws or some kind of slashing protrusion. This is because the Japanese name is "Swallow Return/Cut", which is named after a famous sword technique used in feudal Japan that was supposed to look like a swallow's tail and what the move is supposed to be based on (hence the slashing shown in the attack's animations). Note that in its debut generation, Swellow was the only Pokémon that learned the move without a TM. The anime doesn't help with this, since it depicts the attack as a sort of flying tackle/slash combo.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Bug, Fighting, Grass
      • Weak: Electric, Rock, Steel
    • Defense
      • Strong: Bug, Fighting, Grass
      • Weak: Electric, Ice, Rock
      • Immune: Ground
  • Feathered Fiend: The bird-based Flying-types are definitely not all handsome and pleasant. Fearow, Dodrio, Honchkrow, Unfezant, and Mandibuzz deserve particular mention, along with all the bird-based legendaries except Ho-Oh.
  • Flight: It's a given — virtually all Flying-types can fly in some manner, and though some are too young and small to fly yet, they'll evolve into something that can. The only exceptions are Gyarados, the Doduo line, the Hoppip line, and Mantine, but the latter two can still glide on wind currents in lieu of flying themselves. Subverted with Hawlucha and the Gligar line, which can glide in a manner almost identical to flight given the proper wind conditions.
  • Fragile Speedster: Most of them have Speed as their best stat, especially in Generation VI when a number of Pokémon received slight boosts to one of their stats; many Com Mon birds received Speed boosts as part of this. The fastest non-legendary Pokémon, Ninjask, is a Flying-type. Also, many of them can learn Tailwind to double the Speed of party members for a few turns. Like most generalizations, though, there are exceptions.
  • Game-Breaking Bug: In Black and White, if Gravity was activated while Sky Drop was being used, the opponent Pokémon would be stuck in the air, unable to attack or be attacked. This could potentially lead to an Unwinnable situation if neither side has a move that can hit the stuck Mon.
    • In Sun and Moon, if Sky Drop is used on a Pokémon protected by Spiky Shield and the resulting damage would KO the Sky Drop user, they instead remain on the field with 0 HP, unable to attack or be attacked. Unlike the Gravity/Sky Drop glitch, not even moves that can hit a Pokémon in the semi-invulnerable state can fix this—the game views the opposing side of the field as empty, as evidenced by the fact that the displayed message isn't "But it missed" or "[Pokémon] avoided the attack", which are generally used when a move misses; rather, it's "But it failed", which appears when trying to attack an empty side of the field (either because a quicker opponent self-KOed or a quicker partner in a Double Battle cleared the field.)
  • Giant Flyer: Ho-oh, Lugia, and Yveltal are the largest birds in the Pokémon world and rank among the largest Pokémon altogether, though Rayquaza, also a Flying-type, is longer still and the tenth "tallest" Pokémon overall.
  • Guide Dang It!:
    • Sky Drop had a weight limit added to it in X and Y that the games don't mention.
    • There are a few moves which can hit a Pokémon that's in the "invulnerable" state of Fly, Bounce, or Sky Drop, like Thunder, Twister and Hurricane. Nobody will ever tell you this in the games.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: Air Cutter hits all opponents in Doubles, Triples, and Horde Battles.
  • In a Single Bound: With the Bounce move, the user springs high into the air on the first turn to crash back down on the second, potentially causing paralysis.
  • Life Drain: Yveltal's Secret Art Oblivion Wing heals the user for 75% of the damage it dealt.
  • Limit Break: The Flying-type Z-Move is Supersonic Skystrike, in which the user soars up and plummets towards the target at full speed, impacting with enough force to tear the ground apart.
  • Nerf:
    • Hurricane had its Power lowered from 120 to 110 in X and Y.
    • Sky Drop will fail on anything weighing more than 400.9 lbs. (200 kg) as of X and Y.
  • Obvious Rule Patch: During Gen V, Sky Drop was banned from random Wi-Fi matches, official tournaments, and even the in-game Pokémon World Tournament due to an exploit that could neuter a target Pokémon for an entire match in Double and Triple battles.
  • Razor Wind: Air Slash and Air Cutter attack with sharp gusts of wind that slice up opponents.
  • Recurring Element: As mentioned in Com Mons above, every generation includes a weak Normal/Flying bird Pokémon encountered early on. Gen I actually had both Pidgey and Spearow, Gen II brought Hoothoot, and so on for Taillow, Starly, Pidove, Fletchling, and Pikipek in further generations. Their evolved forms are definitely not all mediocre, though, especially Staraptor and Talonflame (who by that time has actually changed to a Fire/Flying-type).
  • Resting Recovery: The move Roost, which is described as the user landing to rest. This restores half its max HP, and if a Flying-type uses the move, they'll lose their Flying type for the remainder of the turnnote . This will cause some interesting effects:
    • If a pure Flying-type Pokémon successfully uses Roost, it will become Normal-type until the end of the turn. If a Pokémon is a Fire/Flying type that lost its Fire type due to using Burn Up (such as Moltres or Ho-Oh), using Roost causes it to become typeless until the end of the turn.
    • If a Pokémon with another type besides Flying uses Roost, it will lose its Flying type until the end of the turn (but will not have it replaced with the Normal type).
    • If a pure Flying-type Pokémon that has been affected by Forest's Curse/Trick-or-Treat successfully uses Roost, its Flying type will be replaced by Normal, in addition to retaining its Grass or Ghost type addition, respectively.
  • Secret Art:
    • Aerilate turns all Normal-type attacks into Flying-type and give a free 20% damage boost that stacks with the STAB bonus (30% in Gen VI).
    • Big Pecks prevent the user's Defense from being lowered.
    • Gale Wings gives Flying-type moves +1 priority (in Gen VI, this always applied, but from Gen VII onwards, it only applies at full health).
    • Multiscale decreases damage taken by 50% if the user's HP is full when the hit is taken.
    • Delta Stream activates a weather condition which turns any attack that's normally super-effective against flying to neutral. Due to being weather-based, this can be cancelled out with Air Lock or Cloud Nine.
    • The move Sky Drop picks up the opponent during the first turn and drops them the second, but can fail if used on anything past a specific weight threshold and will not damage anyone immune to Ground type moves.
  • Somewhere, an Ornithologist Is Crying: The Zubat, Woobat, and Noibat lines are in the Flying egg group, which is otherwise restricted to Pokémon that are birds.
  • Status Buff: Tailwind doubles the Speed of the user and their allies for 4 turns (3 turns in Gen IV).
  • Super Mode: Charizard, Pidgeot, Gyarados, Aerodactyl, Altaria, Salamence, and Rayquaza are capable of Mega Evolution. Mega Charizard X, Gyarados, and Altaria have their Flying-type replaced with another type, while Pinsir gains the Flying-type.
  • This Is a Drill: Drill Peck has the user use a corkscrew attack with its bill acting like a drill. In the anime, the bill spins like a drill on its own.
  • Tornado Move: Gust and Hurricane hit the target with a tornado.
  • Wind from Beneath My Wings: Most Flying-types use their wings to generate the aforementioned Blow You Away attacks, although not all (Drifloon and Drifblim obviously don't when using Gust, for instance).
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    Psychic 

Psychic-Type / Esper-Type (エスパータイプ esupaa taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/psychic_types.png

Pokémon with various types of mental or magical abilities, they have a tendency to be used whenever a particular Pokémon has a vague sort of magical power that doesn't fit any of the other elemental types. They are usually found in more urban environments.

On paper, Psychic-Types were supposed to be weak to Ghost and Bug, but both of those types were rare with only weak attacks (not helped by a glitch that made it outright IMMUNE to Ghost), and a quarter of all Pokémon in Gen I were part Poison (including the only Ghost-types at the time, as well as the only Bug-types with Bug-type attacks worth half a damn). Add on the facts that Psychic-types favored the Special stat, which governed Special Attack and Special Defense, that there were a lot of strong Psychic-types (including Mewtwo, one of the most powerful Pokémon in the series), and that Psychic was only resisted by itself, and Psychic was one of the best types in the game. This reign of terror ended with the introduction of 2 types, Dark and Steel, both of which were defensively strong against Psychic attacks (Dark-types being flat-out immune, as well as offensively strong against Psychic-types), the introduction of better Bug and Ghost moves, and splitting apart the Special stat. Furthermore, Psychic is only resistant to itself and Fighting, making it the second-worst defensive typing after Ice. Needless to say, the Psychic-type is no longer a Game-Breaker. Nonetheless, Psychic is the type with the most Legendary and Mythical Pokémon associated with it, with all generations having at least two of them being at least part Psychic, with the exception of Gen VI (which only had one).


  • Alien Among Us: Implied with at least some Psychic-types, confirmed with Deoxys, Elgyem, Beheeyem, the Cosmog line, and Necrozma.
  • Always Accurate Attack: Hyperspace Hole bypasses accuracy and evasion checks when used.
  • Armor-Piercing Attack: Future Sight and Hyperspace Hole ignore protection moves (Protect, Mat Block, etc.) when they deal damage.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Future Sight has good power, but it takes two turns before the attack hits- more than enough time for the opponent to switch to something that can tank or nullify the attack.
    • Stored Power increases damage based on the amount of status buffs the user has. As it initially has a power of 20 it doesn't seem that useful, but with every single stat buffed up to maximum the power skyrockets to 860, even more powerful than Explosion. Getting to that point requires an entire team with Baton Pass and stat-boosting moves or a Smeargle with Moody/Acupressure, and it takes while to fully play out. And even if you do manage to pull off the stat boosts, your opponent could still completely nullify the attack with a Dark-type Pokémon.
      • That said, buffing it all the way to 860 is essentially There Is No Kill Like Overkill territory. It's fully possible with the right setup to unleash a 260 power Stored Power on turn 1 in a Double Battle.
    • Necrozma's Prismatic Laser is essentially a slightly stronger Psychic-type Hyper Beam, which means using it forces the user to spend a turn sitting around doing nothing... and it could do more damage by spamming Psychic or Photon Geyser anyways.
  • Barrier-Busting Blow: Psychic Fangs breaks Reflect, Light Screen and Aurora Veil before dealing damage, unless the target is immune or if the move misses.
  • Barrier Warrior: The two main screen moves, Reflect and Light Screen, are both Psychic-type — and so is the move Barrier, in fact. Mr. Mime is a particularly noteworthy example, as it is generally associated with all three moves (its original Japanese name is even "Barrierd").
  • Color-Coded Elements: The Psychic-type icon is deep pink/magenta, though Psychic-types themselves come in a variety of colors.
  • Counter Attack: Mirror Coat, which only works against Special attacks and doesn't affect Dark-types, hits the opponent for double the damage the user took.
  • Damage Typing:
    • Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Psychic-type attacks dealt Special damage.
    • Played with for Psyshock and Psystrike. The moves are Special attacks and can be countered by Mirror Coat, but calculate damage using the target's Defense stat instead of Special Defense.
  • Dangerous Forbidden Technique: Deoxys's Secret Art, Psycho Boost, deals massive damage but lowers the user's Special Attack stat by two stages when it hits.
  • Dream Stealer: The move Dream Eater not only damages the target but also restores the user's HP, on the grounds that the user is devouring the target's dream. It should be said, though, that while this is a Psychic move, it's at least as much associated with Ghost-types.
  • Easy Amnesia: So easy that Pokémon can inflict it on themselves via the Psychic move Amnesia, sharply raising Sp. Def.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Not to the extent of Ghost-types, mind you, but Psychic-types can get pretty freaking weird. Special mention goes to the Ralts line (in the Amorphous egg group despite being humanoid, capable of creating small black holes, etc.), Unown (a Reality Warping Hive Mind from another dimension that vaguely resembles the letters of the English alphabet), Mewtwo (manmade monstrosity intended to be as powerful as the legendary Mew but gone horribly awry), and Necrozma (a being from Ultra Space that's made of black prisms, is violent and aggressive, steals light from worlds, and is the remains of a who once was a benevolent light dragon).
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Fighting, Poison
      • Weak: Psychic, Steel
      • Can't Hit: Dark
    • Defense
      • Strong: Fighting, Psychic
      • Weak: Bug, Dark, Ghost (Gen II-Forward)
      • Immune: Ghost (Gen I Only)
  • The Empath: Many of them are skilled at sensing emotion.
  • Failed Future Forecast: Prior to Gen V, the move Future Sight had 90% accuracy, meaning there was a 10% chance your Pokémon would "foresee an attack" that never actually came to pass. It's since been boosted to 100% accuracy, though that's still not failproof.
  • "Freaky Friday" Flip: The Psychic repertoire includes a number of "swap" moves in which the user exchanges some attribute with the target: Power Swap exchanges their Attack and Sp. Atk values; Guard Swap exchanges their Defense and Sp. Def values; Skill Swap exchanges their abilities; and Heart Swap exchanges their stat changes.
  • Gravity Master: The move Gravity, which negates the Ground immunity conferred by the Flying-type and Levitate, as well as inhibiting certain airborne moves like Bounce, falls under the Psychic banner.
  • Healing Shiv: The move Heal Pulse, which restores HP but cannot target the user.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: The move Healing Wish, which makes the user faint but restores the HP and status of the next Pokémon to switch in. Cresselia's Secret Art Lunar Dance is an even better version that restores PP as well.
  • Infinity +1 Element: In the original games, a player would have an incredibly difficult time without at least one Psychic of their own, and would have no way to counter NPCs' Psychics except with sheer Level Grinding. This was remedied by the introduction of the Dark-type and to a lesser extent the Steel-type in Gen II, as well as making Psychic types weak to Ghost, and giving them and Bug types stronger moves.
  • Limit Break: The Psychic-type Z-Move is Shattered Psyche, in which the user controls the target and hurts them.
  • Light 'em Up: For the longest time, it was the closest in-game equivalent. Starting with Gen II, Pokémon associated with the sun and light were cast as this type, including angelic Pokémon like Gardevoirnote , Cresselia and Celebi. They were always contrasted against the traditionally "dark" Ghost and Dark types, albeit weak to them. Even after the debut of Fairy-types, the de facto sun Pokémon, Solgaleo, is Psychic/Steel. Necrozma takes it to its logical conclusion, with it absorbing light, having Prismatic Laser and Photon Geyser for Secret Arts, and having a true form made of light.
  • Light Is Good: Like Fairy-types, many Psychic-types are angelic and nice, such as Cresselia, Gardevoir (Who also happens to be Fairy-type), the lake spirits (Azelf, Uxie, and Mesprit), and the Cosmog line.
  • Light Is Not Good: Originally, Psychic-types were very sinister, with the likes of Drowzee, known for preying on children in particular as its evolved form Hypno, in its ranks. Mewtwo, the original "evil" Pokémon, is a Psychic-type's mascot, contrasting strongly against more angelic Pokémon within it. Coming after Mewtwo is Malamar, a Psychic/Dark type who willfully tries to control the minds of people and Pokemon, and portrayed as one of the few "evil" Pokemon in the anime. Then there is Necrozma, who is not only an all-black prism creature that looks more robot than Pokémon (and has powers centered around light), but also the Big Bad of Pokémon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon (and indeed the first Pokémon to be the villain of a main game).
  • Like Cannot Cut Like: Psychics can wall against Psychic attacks.
  • Nerf: Gold and Silver introduced the Dark- and Steel-types to resist their attacks (and in Dark's case, hit Psychic for super effective damage), and more powerful Bug- and Ghost-type moves were introduced.
  • Man Bites Man: Psychic Fangs deals damage with the user's teeth.
  • Non-Elemental: Psywave (all games) and Future Sight (pre-Generation V) do not take Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors into account or get a STAB bonus when they deal damage.
  • Power Copying: Trace (an Ability) and Role Play (a Move) can copy most Abilities. Each has a few exceptions they can't copy.
  • Primal Fear: Because Psychic Pokémon tend to refer to mental ability and the mind, their weaknesses are also based on common fears — Bugs, the Dark, and Ghosts.
  • Psychic Powers: The Psychic-type has access to a vast array of powers, like telepathy, telekinesis, precognition, and much more.
  • Randomized Damage Attack: Psywave is an odd variant in that it inflicts a random amount of damage ranging from 50% to 150% of the user's level, making it a hybrid of this and its total opposite. Also, it doesn't inflict type damage (but Dark-types can still stop it).
  • Reality Warper: Some Psychic-type moves create bizarre effects on the battlefield, as seen with the three Room attacks. Trick Room sets an effect where slower Pokémon go before faster ones. Wonder Room swaps the Defense and Special Defense stats of everyone. Magic Room negates the effects of items. A move similar to Trick Room, Speed Swap, swaps the Speed stats of the user and the target.
  • Resting Recovery: Rest, a move which cures status conditions and restores the user's HP at the cost of falling asleep, is under this type.
  • Scissors Cuts Rock: Miracle Eye allows Psychic-type moves to affect Dark-types, who are normally immune to them.
  • Secret Art:
  • Seers: Some Psychic-type moves involve divining the future in some way, such as Future Sight (which has the added bonus of dealing damage). The Ability Forewarn also qualifies, as the user's powers warn it of the opponent's strongest move.
  • Situational Sword: Synchronoise only works if the user and target share a type.
  • Squishy Wizard: Most of them hit very hard with Special Attack, but are not good at defense. Alakazam is a notable example: it's ludicrously fast and has Special Attack to match, but neutral physical attacks are incredibly painful, and super-effective physical attacks are likely going to take it down in one hit. They do tend to have good Special Defense, though.
  • Starfish Aliens: Some Psychic-types are implied to be extraterrestrial in origin and many of these are pretty weird looking. Deoxys, Elgyem, Beheeyem, and (if one counts extradimensional beings) Necrozma are the only ones for whom this is confirmed to be the case, but Starmie also has this suggested of it.
  • Status Buff:
    • Calm Mind increases the user's Special Attack and Special Defense by 1 stage each.
    • Meditate increases Attack by 1 stage.
    • Agility increases Speed by 2 stages.
    • Reflect and Light Screen decrease the damage taken from Physical attacks and Special attacks, respectively, by all allies by 50% in Single Battles and 33% in Double or Triple Battles. They aren't dispelled by switching and stack multiplicativately with Defense/Special Defense boosts, but only last for 5 turns (or 8 with a Light Clay). (In Gen I, the note about stacking multiplicativately still held true, but they lasted indefinitely and wore off upon switching.)
    • Amnesia increases Special Defense by 2 stages. In Generation I, it increases Special by two stages.
    • Cosmic Power increases Defense and Special Defense by 1 stage.
    • Barrier increases Defense by 2 stages.
  • Super Intelligence: The abilities of many Psychic Pokémon stem from their ridiculously high intelligence.
  • Super Mode: Alakazam, Slowbro, Mewtwo, Gardevoir, Medicham, Metagross, Latias, Latios, and Gallade are capable of Mega Evolution. Mewtwo has two potential Mega Evolutions. Necrozma can not only absorb Solgaleo or Lunala for a stronger form, but it can also Ultra Burst (effectively Mega Evolution, only not actually) from there into the stronger-than-Arceus Ultra Necrozma.
  • Telepathy: Most Psychic Pokémon are natural telepaths, but there is also an actual ability called Telepathy which ensures a Pokémon cannot be hit by its allies in a Double/Triple battle.
  • Teleporters and Transporters: Teleport is a Psychic-type move that allows the user to escape from a Wild Pokémon and can take you back to the last Pokémon Center you visited when used outside of battle. Unfortunately, that's all it does — it's useless in battles with Trainers and is rendered obsolete outside of battle once you get Fly (and the latter isn't even doable in Gen VII thanks to field moves being cut).
    • Teleportation in general is often associated with Psychic-types. All the Gyms that specialize in Psychic-types have at least a few teleporters that you have to use to make your way through.
  • Underground Monkey: The Alolan Raichu is part Psychic-Type.
  • Weaksauce Weakness: They're weak to Bug-type attacks. In Red, Blue, and Yellow, this was their only weakness due to a bug that made Psychic immune to Ghost.

    Bug 

Bug-Type (むしタイプ mushi taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/bug_types.png

Bugs are made up of mostly insectoid Pokémon as the name implies, but tend to represent arthropods in general, rather than just what we would consider "bugs", up to and including crabs and extinct arthropods like Anomalocaris. Like with Dragon-types, there are a few Pokémon based on arthropods that are not Bug-type, though they have characteristics in common with Bug-types.

They are normally fragile in combat, as one might expect, but tend to be surprisingly effective offensively, as they are highly effective against the popular Dark- and Psychic-types. They're also super-effective against Grass-types. However, they're resisted by Poison-, Fighting-, Fire-, Flying-, Ghost-, Steel-, and Fairy-types. Defensively, they resist Fighting-, Grass-, and Ground-type attacks, but are weak to Fire, Flying, and Rock.

Bug-types are often found in the beginnings of a journey. They start extremely weak, sometimes get not much better, and then have stats that are stronger than most things in that stage — but only that stage. There are a few exceptions, though; Gen V in particular has quite a few strong contenders. They are typically found in forest areas, but are commonplace enough that one can expect to find them nearly anywhere.


  • Action Initiative: First Impression is a powerful attack with increased priority, but it only works on the first turn in battle, like Fake Out.
  • All Webbed Up: String Shot, Spider Web, and Sticky Web are Bug-type moves with ensnaring effects. Savage Spin-Out also uses webbing to attack.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: Silver Wind has a rare chance to raise all of the user's stats (except Evasion, Accuracy, and critical hit rate) by one stage at the same time. However, it's only a mere 10% chance, and the attack's power of 60 and maximum PP count of 8 means it can't be relied on that much.
  • Balance Buff: The type used to be one of the worst ones overall, then Generation IV introduced several Bug-type moves that can be accessed at the appropriate levels, such as Bug Bite, X-Scissor, and Bug Buzz. Generation V gave them some immense buffs and introduced powerhouses such as Scolipede, Galvantula, Volcarona, and Genesect. Generation VII also introduced Vikavolt, Araquanid, Golisopod, and Buzzwole, all four of which are incredibly useful Mighty Glaciers, Ribombee is a very fast Support Party Member has Pollen Puff, which functions both as a powerful Bug-type attack and a healing move when it's used on a partner, and Pheromosa is an extremely fast and powerful Glass Cannon.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: Despite being based on insects, a lot of them are just as large as Pokémon of other types. The largest is Scolipede, which is around 8 feet (either height or length) and the heaviest is Buzzwole, weighing 735.5 Ibs (333.6 kg). The smallest is Joltik, which is reasonable in size for a bug. It's only 4 inches long, about the size of a tarantula. (However, it's based on a tick, which is generally much smaller.)
  • Bug Buzz: The Trope Namer. It attacks the enemy with the sound wave of rapidly buzzing insect wings, even if the Pokémon in question doesn't even have wings. Because this is a sound-based move, it can bypass substitutes, but it is blocked by the Soundproof ability and if the user of the move has been hit by Throat Chop.
  • Com Mons: They tend to be species that are very common in the beginning-game, but not that useful beyond the early levels.
  • Color-Coded Elements: The Bug-type icon is lime green, as are many Bugs themselves.
  • Crutch Character: After the beginning-game, the first few bugs tend to be overshadowed very quickly.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Bug attacks dealt Physical damage.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Dark, Grass, Poison (Gen I Only), Psychic
      • Weak: Fairy, Fighting, Fire, Flying, Ghost, Poison (Gen II-Forward), Steel
    • Defense
      • Strong: Fighting, Grass, Ground
      • Weak: Fire, Flying, Poison (Gen I Only), Rock
  • Four-Legged Insect: Setting aside the bipedal insects like Pinsir and Scyther, there are some four-legged ones like Ariados, Surskit, Nincada, and Joltik.
  • Fragile Speedster: Typical for insectoid fighters, with emphasis on the fragile in a lot of cases.
  • Heal Thyself: Heal Order, one of the Secret Arts of Vespiquen, restores HP.
  • Healing Shiv: Pollen Puff, the Secret Art of Ribombee, is notable for actually dealing damage if you use it on an opponent. If Pollen Puff targets an ally, it heals their HP instead.
  • Horn Attack: The mighty Megahorn, the strongest of all Bug-Type attacks, is learned by many Pokémon with impressively strong horns — especially Heracross, since it's based on a beetle.
  • Irony: Out of all of the types, Bug's only second to Normal when it comes to having Flying as a secondary type. There's only a couple of Bug-types capable of learning Fly, and neither of them are part-Flying.
  • Kryptonite Is Everywhere: Just like Grass, Bug is resisted by seven types. Thankfully, many Bug-types have surprisingly good movepools, allowing them to work around this.
  • Life Drain: Leech Life allows Bug-types (and Zubat) to heal themselves for half of the damage inflicted to the enemy. However, it was the most mediocre Life Drain attack up until Gen VII's major buff to its base power, bringing it up from 20 to 80.
  • Light 'em Up: The move Signal Beam is described as a "sinister beam of light". Psychic-, Water-, and Electric-types tend to learn the move through tutors.
  • Limit Break: The Bug-type Z-Move is Savage Spin-Out, in which the user binds the target with threads of silk, throws and drags the resulting cocoon around violently, and then cuts the cocoon (and the target) with a slash.
  • Master of None: Most of the early generation Bug-type Pokemon tend to have rather poor stats, usually because they're the early-game bugs. This trait has since been mostly dropped out from Generation V onwards.
  • Mutual Disadvantage:
    • They are mutually resistant to Fighting-types.
    • In Gen I, they are mutually weak against Poison-types. Not anymore from Gen II onwards, as Poison-types resist Bug attacks, while Bug-types take neutral damage from Poison attacks.
  • Pest Controller: Several moves, such as Infestation and Attack Order, have such effects.
  • Secret Art:
    • The Ability Swarm increases the power of Bug moves when the user is at 1/3 or less health.
    • The Ability Compound Eyes gives a 30% accuracy bonus to the user's attacks. The bonus works on a multiplier, so a move with 70% accuracy will hit 91% of the time, not 100%. It also increases the chance that a wild Pokémon will hold an item when encountered.
    • The Ability Shield Dust protects the user from the secondary effects of attacks (such as Shadow Ball's potential Special Defense drop or Scald's chance to burn).
    • The Bug Buzz move has a 10% chance to lower the target's Special Defense and is a sound-based attack.
    • The Sticky Web move sets a trap on the opposing team's side that lowers the speed of grounded Pokémon that switch into battle.
  • Shown Their Work: Possibly unintentionally, but String Shot and its effect (slowing down the opponent) are nigh identical to the bizarre prey catching method of the velvet worm, a small, multi-legged invertebrate that ensnares its prey by squirting a long strand of sticky goo on them, which then hardens and immobilizes the target.
  • Spam Attack: Pin Missile hits the target 2-5 times on each use, with each individual hit dealing weak damage.
  • Status Buff:
    • Vespiquen's Secret Art, Defend Order increases Defense and Special Defense by 1 stage.
    • Quiver Dance increases Special Attack, Special Defense, and Speed by 1 stage each.
    • Tail Glow drastically increases Special Attack, meaning the user can max out their Special Attack in 2 turns.
  • Super Mode: Beedrill, Pinsir, Scizor, and Heracross are capable of Mega Evolution.
  • Switch-Out Move: The move U-turn inflicts damage before forcing the user to switch out. Many Flying-types and naturally fast Pokémon tend to get this move from TM.
  • Too Dumb to Fool: One possible reason why they're strong against Dark-types and Psychic-types — insects are just too simple-minded to fall for the trickery of a Dark-type or be bested by a Psychic-type's mental attacks.
  • Turns Red: The Ability Swarm boosts the power of Bug-type moves by 30% when the user is at low health. Unusually enough, this ability is the only one of its kind that isn't a starter type-exclusive.
  • Weak, but Skilled: On the offensive department, Bug-types seem rather lackluster. However, they have many tricks up their sleeve. U-turn and Sticky Web are great for utility purpose, with Tail Glow and Quiver Dance being one of the best Status Buff moves in the game. Additionally, most Pokemon based on butterfly or moth can learn Stun Spore or Sleep Powder.
  • Weak to Fire: Bug/Steel and Bug/Grass are some of the most common Bug type combinations, and they take quadruple damage from Fire attacks. The former combo is especially noteworthy because this double weakness is their only weakness.
  • "X" Makes Anything Cool: The move X-Scissor has the user attack by doing a scissors motion with their claws (or whatever is being used to slash), creating an X-shaped slash.
  • You Will Not Evade Me: The move Spider Web traps the target in the arena so long as it's not a Ghost-type.

    Rock 

Rock-Type (いわタイプ iwa taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rock_types.png

A type made up of Pokémon with mineral bodies, prehistoric Pokémon brought back to life through Fossil Revivalnote , or those just durable enough to be considered rock-like. Many of them are physically strong in both attack and defense. Rock attacks are particularly effective against a lot of types; hitting Fire, Bug, Ice, and Flying super effectively while being resisted by Ground, Fighting, and Steel (if a hypothetical Pokémon had all 18 types simultaneously, it would still be weak to Rock moves). Defensively, they resist Poison, Fire, Flying, and Normal but are weak to Water, Grass, Ground, Fighting, and Steel. They tend to reside in caves, arid lands, and mountainous regions.

The type is best known for having several moves that can be taught to a large variety of Pokémon via TMs or Move Tutors like Rock Slide, Stone Edge, and Stealth Rock, as well as a lack of moves that are both powerful and accurate.

When a sandstorm is raging, Rock-type Pokémon are unaffected by the residual damage from the sandstorm, and their Special Defense is boosted by 50%.


  • Action Initiative: Accelerock has a priority of +1, meaning it goes before most attacks.
  • Anti-Air: As one of the types super-effective against Flying-types. As the matter of fact, one of its moves, Smack Down, will remove any immunity to Ground-type moves the target may have. It even knocks the target out of the sky if it's in the middle of using Fly, Bounce, or Sky Drop.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Ancient Power has a rare chance to raise all of the user's stats (except Evasion, Accuracy, and critical hit rate) by one stage at the same time. However, it's only a mere 10% chance, and the attack's power of 60 and maximum PP count of 8 means it can't be relied on that much.
    • Head Smash inflicts enormous damage, but it has low PP and accuracy and will deal half the damage it dealt back to the user. On more frail users, that really hurts. The last part is averted if the user has the Rock Head ability, which nullifies recoil.
    • Rock Wrecker is a Rock-type clone of Giga Impact, meaning that your opponent will have 1 turn to rock your world after you use it. Also, you could do more damage by using Rock Slide or Stone Edge repeatedly (assuming that they don't miss).
    • The more commonnote  Stone Edge has 100 base attack with a high Critical Hit ratio, but it has a pitiful amount of PP and prone to miss (though not as much as Thunder and Blizzard), making this move a huge liability, especially when travelling long distances in-game. NPCs are not as affected by this, since many of them are packing this move on at least one of their Pokémon.
  • Cast from Hit Points: Head Smash. Notable for damaging the user for 1/2 of the damage dealt to the target compared to the other Recoil moves' 1/4 or 1/3, thanks to having a Power of 150.
  • Crutch Character: Rock-type's defensive role is only relevant early in the game, where most of the Pokémon are either Normal, Bug, or Flying-types. Past that point of the game, they get overshadowed by Steel defensively and the types they are weak to become much more common.
  • Chunky Updraft: Ancient Power is depicted in-game as a rising wave of stones around the opponent. Stone Edge is depicted similarly.
  • Color-Coded Elements: The Rock-type icon is dark brown, though Rock-types themselves are usually varying shades of grey or black.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Rock-type attacks were Physical.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: Rock is a very strong type, but it's not without problems. Offensively, it provides awesome coverage and has powerful attacks, but most Rock-type moves have less than 100% accuracy. The few Rock-type moves that have good accuracy are very weak (Ancient Power and Smack Down) or have limited distribution (Power Gem and Diamond Storm). Defensively, the type's tendencies towards low Special Defense stats and a myriad of weaknesses make them far more brittle than expected. Using Rock-types holds a lot of risk, but if the odds are in your favor they will yield results.
  • Dishing Out Dirt: One of two types to represent this, along with Ground. They attack with stones and boulders. Naturally, they can easily learn Ground-type moves.
  • Dumb Muscle: Rock-types almost universally have poor Special Attack and favor physical Attacks, compounded by Power Gem and Ancient Power being the only two Special Rock-type attacks, and not many Rock-types learn them anyway.
  • Eat Dirt, Cheap: Many of them feed on sediment, most notably the Tyranitar and Aggron families.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Bug, Fire, Flying, Ice
      • Weak: Fighting, Ground, Steel
    • Defense
      • Strong: Fire, Flying, Normal, Poison
      • Weak: Fighting, Grass, Ground, Steel, Water
  • Fossil Revival: All of the fossil Pokémon are part Rock.
  • Gemstone Assault: The moves Power Gem ("a ray of light that sparkles as if it were made of gemstones") and Diamond Storm (a storm of sharp diamonds and the Secret Art of Diancie).
  • Glass Cannon: A few Rock types don't prioritize on defense stats, which, combined with Rock type's myriad of elemental weaknesses, lead them to become this.
    • One of the earliest example is Aerodactyl. It is one of the fastest Rock-type Pokemon around with a decent attack stat to boot. However, its defenses are awful. Its Mega Evolution is the fastest Rock-type Pokemon and its attack receive a sizable boost while gaining Tough Claw as its ability. While Mega Aerodactyl is less frail compared to its regular counterpart, its bulk falls flat compared to the rest of the Rock-type Pokemon.
    • Rampardos has one of the highest attacking stats in the game (comparable to Legendary and Mega evolved Pokémon), but its other stats are either average or below average.
    • Archeops has incredible attacking stats and a speed stat to match, but not only are its defenses on the low side, its ability cripples those attacking stats if it gets too low on health.
    • Generation VII introduced Lycanroc, bucking the trend of its generation, is a fast attacker. Two of its forms (Midday and Dusk) has Accelerock, allowing it to strike first before most moves do. Lycanroc's defenses, however, are all on the low side, especially with its type in consideration.
    • Also introduced in Gen VII, Nihilego has above-average Speed and wonderful special stats, but its Defense is awful, something a nasty double Ground weakness doesn't help, especially since the majority of those moves are physical.
  • Kryptonite Is Everywhere: The Rock type is tied with the Grass type for the most weaknesses, with five. Of those weaknesses, three of them — Water, Ground, and Fighting — are some of the strongest offensive types in the game, and Steel is the best defensive typing and is likely to have a Steel-type attack even if it's purely defensive. Fortunately, Rock doesn't have nearly as many resistors as Grass does.
  • Last Chance Hit Point: The very useful ability Sturdy, which is mainly associated with the Rock-type, protects the Pokémon from one-hit knockouts by leaving it with one HP if an attack would otherwise take it from full health to zero. It also protects against the One-Hit KO moves, and that was what the Ability did prior to Gen V, but the newer feature is more important.
  • Last Disc Magic: The TM for Stone Edge is only available late or post-game or can be learned naturally by many Rock-types during the aforementioned time frame. Due to the large amount of Pokémon that can learn it, said TM is harder to find compared to other examples of this trope.
  • Limit Break: The Rock-type Z-Move is Continental Crush, in which the user forms a gigantic rock by fusing many small rocks and drops it on the target.
  • Mighty Glacier: Speed is not the forte of this type, but when it comes to Attack and Defense stats, they shine.
  • Poor, Predictable Rock: Pun aside, when you go up against a Rock-type, you're probably not going to have to worry much about them exploiting a low Special Defense; even after the split, almost all Rock-type moves are physical. Some Rock-types, like Rhydon/Rhyperior and Aggron, have surprisingly large coverage movepools, but they lack the Special Attack to take advantage of them.
  • Powerful, but Inaccurate: The driving force behind Rock-type attacks is that they have great damage, but their accuracy is poor.
  • Prehistoric Monster: A group of extinct Pokémon, known as Fossil Pokémon as they're generally revived from various fossils are all Rock types. They range from invertebrates that lived in the sea to ones that are based on actual dinosaurs and other prehistoric reptiles.
  • Rock Monster: Most of them are clearly comprised in part of rocks and other minerals, though some, like Archeops, really push the concept in terms of design.
  • Rolling Attack: Rollout, which increases in strength each consecutive turn.
  • Secret Art: Rock Wrecker, a Rock-Type Giga Impact (massive damage, but requires a recharge turn afterwards when it hits).
  • Shed Armor, Gain Speed: Half of all Pokémon with the Weak Armor Ability (which sharply raises the user's Speed but lowers its Defense for every contact attack it takes) are Rock-type, as are over half of the Pokémon that can learn Shell Smash. Minior's Shields Down ability boosts its Speed AND both attack stats at the cost of defense when its health is reduced to half.
  • Silicon-Based Life: Many Rock-types are completely made up of rocks, like Geodude and Regirock. Uniquely, Nihilego is a Rock-type that's made of glass (molten sand).
  • Spam Attack: Rock Blast hits the target 2-5 times on each use, with each hit dealing weak damage.
  • Status Buff: Rock Polish increases the user's Speed by 2 stages. All Rock-types also get a 50% boost to Special Defense during a Sandstorm.
  • Stock Dinosaurs: Played straight and subverted. Some Fossil Pokemon are based on well-known species (like Tyrantrum), while others are definitely more obscure, such as the Amargasaurus-inspired Aurorus. A good number of them also aren't dinosaurs at all, being based instead on extinct invertebrates and primitive reptiles.
  • Stone Wall: Statistically, though the type's weaknesses don't always bear it out. Shuckle and Carbink (and Diancie) are strong on both defenses, while Regirock, Rhyperior, Golem, and even Onix are top physical defenders (and Regirock's special defense is pretty good, too, being part of a defensively-oriented legendary trio.)
  • Super Mode: Aerodactyl, Tyranitar, Aggron, and Diancie are capable of Mega Evolution. Mega Aggron loses its Rock-type, though.
  • Trap Master: The move Stealth Rock lays down a hazard on the opponent's side of the field, dealing damage to anything that switches in. The amount of HP lost is dependent on how weak a Pokémon is to Rock in the Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors; it deals 3.125% of the switch-in's total HP on a double resist, 6.25% on a single resist, 12.5% on a neutrality, 25% on a single weakness, and a whopping 50% on a double weakness.
  • Use Your Head: The ultra-powerful and dangerous-to-the-user Head Smash works like this.

    Ghost 

Ghost-Type (ゴーストタイプ gohsuto taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ghost_types.png

A group of Pokémon based on spirits, ghosts, goblins, and all manner of mischievous and creepy creatures from beyond the grave. They can be found in abandoned buildings and burial grounds. Due to their unusual nature, the Ghost type has the second-least representatives out of all types.

Ghosts are primarily useful due to the fact that they're immune to 2 types, both of which are particularly common. Their resistances, to Bug and Poison, aren't quite as useful. Combined with other types and abilities, Ghost types usually find a niche in No Selling other attacks. In previous generations, their resistances can overlap with the weaknesses of the Dark type, thus, Pokémon that were both types had no inherent weaknesses (although with the introduction of the Fairy type, this is no longer the case). Ghost types also cannot be trapped and can be freely switched out at any time (they can also run from any wild Pokémon regardless of speed).


  • Action Initiative: Shadow Sneak has increased priority, letting the user circumvent Speed.
  • Animate Inanimate Object: Many Ghost-types are based on living objects, some of which are actually normal objects possessed by spirits. Such examples include Rotom, the Honedge line, the Sandygast line, and Dhelmise.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Ominous Wind has a rare chance to raise all of the user's stats (except Evasion, Accuracy, and critical hit rate) by one stage at the same time. However, it's only a mere 10% chance, and the attack's power of 60 and PP count of 5 (8 at most with PP Up/Max) means it can't be relied on that much.
    • Shadow Force and Phantom Force make you completely invincible for one turn, but said turn is a charge turn that telegraphs what you are doing to your opponent. At least they ignore Protect, Detect and other protection moves.
    • Trick-or-Treat adds the Ghost-type to its target, meaning you can spam your now super effective Ghost STAB at them. However, because it adds the type and doesn't override it, Normal-types will still be immune (and will now be immune to Fighting attacks, their only weakness). Or your opponent can just switch out to something that resists Ghost anyway.
  • Always Accurate Attack:
    • Shadow Punch bypasses accuracy and evasion checks when it's used.
    • No Ghost-type move with a given accuracy number has less than 100% accuracy.
  • Barrier-Busting Blow: The moves Phantom Force and Shadow Force not only bypass Protect and Detect, they also remove the protection for the rest of the turn. They also ignore the negative effects of Spiky Shield, King's Shield and Baneful Bunker.
  • Boring, but Practical: Ghost-type moves tend to be more reliable than those from other types, making them well-suited for patient players.
    • Every move's accuracy is either 100% or it bypasses miss checks entirely; Phantom Force and Shadow Force also give the user substantial protection while hitting through any Defend Command in their way.
    • Attacks like Shadow Bone and Shadow Ball carry higher chances of their added effect activating, and those two moves in particular have a chance to lower the foe's relevant defense stat. The type also has increased priority in Shadow Sneak, Swift-accuracy in Shadow Punch, and a Fixed Damage Attack in Night Shade. None of these attacks are especially powerful, though.
    • The Ghost type's unique status effects — Spite, Curse, Nightmare, Trick-or-Treat, Destiny Bond, and the innate effects in Spirit Shackle and Spectral Thief — aren't as game-changing as the Standard Status Effects found in, say, Grass or Poison moves, but they're more likely to hitnote , harder to get rid ofnote  and less likely to backfirenote .
  • Casting a Shadow: They actually fit this better than the Dark-types. Shadow Claw and Shadow Ball take the form of weaponized darkness, while other attacks like Shadow Punch and Shadow Force describe the user manipulating darkness to hide themselves before striking.
  • Color-Coded Elements: The Ghost icon is a grayish dark purple. Ghost-types are very often purple too.
  • Confusion Fu: Not just in movesets, but in fighting style, as Ghosts have been legitimately used as Mighty Glaciers, Stone Walls, Fragile Speedsters, and as Lightning Bruisers.
  • Curse: Ghost-types are fittingly fond of using moves and Abilities that could be considered curses, including Grudge, Destiny Bond, the Abilities Cursed Body and Mummy, and Curse itself. Curse is a Secret Art that was initially a move of unknown type that worked differently for Ghosts based on a pun. note  Officially became a Ghost type move in Gen V. Cast from Hit Points to regularly drain the opponent's health for Ghost-types; lowers Speed and raises Attack and Defense for anything else.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Ghost-type attacks were Physical.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: They are all rather spooky as expected, but they tend to be more mischievous than malevolent.
  • The Drag-Along: There's a small subset of Pokémon that begin with 35 base friendship rather than 70 when you capture them in the wild — in other words, they're significantly less happy to join up with you than ordinary Pokémon (though you'll still win them over through dedication and care). Ghost- and Dark-types jointly make up a major chunk of this group.
  • Dying Curse: Destiny Bond and Grudge will only work if the user is knocked out on the same turn they are successfully used.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Ghost-types tend to be more otherworldly and bizarre than their contemporaries in the mortal realm, with their very existence often defying scientific explanation - Gengar is a gaseous Living Shadow that's somehow also poisonous, Shedinja is the possessed empty shell left behind by a metamorphosed Ninjask whose back cavity can suck your soul out if you look at it too long, Spiritomb is a merger of one hundred and eight evil souls held together by negative emotions and permanently bound to a keystone, no one knows what Mimikyu is because anyone who looks upon its true form will die of fright, etc.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors:
    • Offense
      • Strong: Ghost, Psychic (Gen II-Forward)
      • Weak: Dark, Steel (Gen II-V)
      • Can't Hit: Normal, Psychic (Gen I Only)
    • Defense
      • Strong: Bug, Poison
      • Weak: Dark, Ghost
      • Immune: Fighting, Normal
  • Faux Flame: Probably an influence as to why the Fire-type move Will-o-Wisp is so widely distributed among Ghost-types and likely the reason it's the only Fire-type move that works when Primal Kyogre's fire-extinguishing rainstorm is in effect. Rest assured, though, the move will burn the target when it lands.
  • Four Is Death: In a very strange way. As of Generation VII, the Ghost Pokémon Evolutionary Families who don't evolve via level-up are in groups of four. 4note  need to be traded to reach their final evolution, and 4note  need stones to reach their final evolution.
  • Intangibility: Why the Ghost-type is immune to Normal and Fighting-type moves, as well as trapping effects/abilities — they can vanish and reappear at will and make matter pass through their bodies. It could also be the reason why Ghost-type moves became neutral against Steel-types in Gen VI.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Type-wise. Ghost is tied with Dragon for fewest unfavorable attacking matchups; it's weak against Dark and nullified by Normal. Offensively, though, it's only strong against itself and Psychic. As a result, Ghost-type attacks will be hitting foes neutrally more often than not.
  • Limit Break: The Ghost-type Z-Move is Never-Ending Nightmare, in which the user summons deep-seated grudges to attack the target, taking the form of huge energy tendrils that pile on the target and explode.
  • Mana Burn: Two different Ghost-type moves can drain PP (Power Points). Spite knocks 4 PP off the move last used (all of it in the Mystery Dungeon games), while Grudge causes all of the PP to be drained from the move that KOed the user.
  • Mechanically Unusual Fighter: Ghost-type attacks aren't very effective offensively, but they have many unique status attacks like Spite, Curse, Nightmare, and Destiny Bond, and also have a number of moves that can inflict other status conditions (Confuse Ray, Lick, Astonish).
  • Mutual Disadvantage: While they enjoy being immune to Normal-type moves, they cannot harm Normal-type Pokémon.
  • Nocturnal Mooks: In the games that base Random Encounters off the time of day, they will only appear at night or in dark areas like caves.
  • Our Ghosts Are Different:
    • Ghost-type Pokémon have many traditional characteristics of ghosts but are not, for the most part, actually spirits of the dead. Some aren't even ghostly at all — Oricorio's Sensu Forme, Alolan Marowak, and Decidueye, for example, are all clearly living and tangible creatures.
    • Despite this, three Ghost-types — Yamask, Phantump and Gengar — are explicitly stated by their Pokédex entries to be actual human ghosts, with Yamask being the spirits of the dead of an ancient civilization, Phantump being the the ghosts of children who died lost in the forest, and Gengar simply being said to have once been human. By extension, this would apply to their evolutionary families as well. These can all be bred, by the way: it's not clear how it works if they're actually the spirits of deceased humans.
  • Our Monsters Are Weird: The type's favoring of Animate Inanimate Object often results in some odd Pokémon like haunted, carnivorous sandcastles and seaweed that use nautical instruments as weapons. Even Ghost-types that aren't directly haunted objects but are based on them can be strange, such as the Litwick line (candles, lamps, and chandeliers), Drifloon and Drifblim (balloons).
  • Power Nullifier: The Ghost type's defenses are defined by its immunities, not its resistances; it is immune to two other types, Normal and Fighting, something no other type can claim. Twenty-five out of the forty-four Ghost-type Pokémon also have access to a third immunity through an ability or secondary typing, and the Pokémon with the most type immunities, Shedinjanote , is partially a Ghost-type.
  • Psychic Powers: Many Ghost-types are capable of learning Psychic-type moves.
  • Purple Is the New Black: The only Ghost types in Gen I, the Gastly line ending in Gengar, was based around a living shadow and are all purple. For them, the wires are crossed, being part Poison.
  • Secret Art:
    • The move Curse will only do its Damage Over Time special effect when used by a Ghost-type.
    • The ability Cursed Body has a 30% chance of preventing the opponent from using the last move they used for the next 4 turns.
  • Situational Damage Attack: Hex has a below-average power of 65, but its power doubles to a whopping 130 when used on targets with Standard Status Effects.
  • Soul Power: A lot of the Ghost-Type's abilities are related to the spirit.
  • Standard Status Effects: Many Ghost-types get Will-O-Wisp, which inflicts Burn.
    • Lick has a high chance of inflicting paralysis, while Confuse Ray is a 100% accurate attack that causes confusion.
    • Hex doesn't cause Standard Status Effects, but it does deal double damage against foes afflicted with them.
  • Status Buff: Curse, when used by a non-Ghost, increases Attack and Defense by 1 stage but also lowers Speed by 1 stage.
  • Stone Wall: Most Ghost-type Pokémon are on the frail side, but the typing itself falls under this. Outside of Z-Moves, signature moves, and moves with variable or unreliable power (such as Hex or Foul Play), no attack that hits the Ghost type super effectively will exceed 90 base power note . The most widespread of them note  top off at only 80 base power. As a result, defensive pure Ghost-types like Dusknoir and Cofagrigus are surprisingly difficult to wear down without status moves — which, considering the abundance of Ghost-exclusive status moves and the typing's weakness to itself, suggests that you have to fight like a ghost to stand a chance against a ghost.
  • Super Mode: Gengar, Sableye, and Banette are capable of Mega Evolution.
  • Supernatural Is Purple: The type's associated color is purple, and many Ghost-type Pokémon and attacks have purple color schemes.
  • Takes One to Kill One: Ghost is one of the two types weak to itself, the other being Dragon.
  • Taking You with Me: Destiny Bond will instantly KO the opponent if their next attack KO's the user, with a success rate that declines with every consecutive use (Gen VII onwards, as it could be used repeatedly without failing in Gen II-VI).
  • Underground Monkey: The Alolan Marowak is part Ghost-Type.
  • Uniqueness Decay: It was once only represented by the Gastly family. Now there's a good selection to choose from (though they're still rare, with 46 Pokémon).
  • Your Soul Is Mine: Ghost-types love stealing souls of people and Pokémon alike.
  • You Will Not Evade Me: The move Spirit Shackle prevents the opponent from switching out or running away if it hits.
  • Was Once a Man: A few Ghost-type families are (at least said to be) the spirits of dead humans.

    Dragon 

Dragon-Type (ドラゴンタイプ doragon taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dragon_types.png

A group based on dragons and similar monsters from around the world. They are among the most elusive types, usually only appearing in secluded areas. As such, they are the third rarest type. Their elusiveness is often related to their power, and some of the strongest and most dangerous Pokémon in the series are Dragon-type. This power, combined with their mysteriousness, makes them very well regarded in some circles. Dragon is a popular type for Legendaries. While the Dragon type covers most dragonlike Pokémon, there are a few dragonlike species that lack the typing but have similar properties and movepools.

Offensively, they are only super effective against themselves, are resisted by only Steel-types, and completely ineffective against Fairy-types. They don't need to hit super effectively to make it hurt. They resist Water, Grass, Fire, and Electric, but are weak to Ice and Fairy, giving them some nice defensive applications.


  • Achilles' Heel:
    • Deliberately invoked with Fairy-Type Pokémon in Gen VI. Fairies are immune to Dragon-Type moves and can deal super effective damage in return. While Ice is only effective offensively, and Steel just resists Dragon-type moves, Fairy is the only type Dragons have a real disadvantage against.
    • Some of the more popular Dragons are also Flying-type, notably Dragonite, Altaria, Salamence, and Rayquaza. This not only cancels Dragon's resistance to Electric, it makes them take quadruple damage from Ice-type attacks.
  • Action Initiative: Dragon Tail has negative priority, causing the user to go last.
  • Always Accurate Attack: As of X and Y, Dragon Rush will always hit a Pokémon that is under the effects of Minimize.
  • Animalistic Abomination: This is what the legendary dragons fall into. Between a mediator for a pair of world-destroying monstrositiesnote , universal concepts made fleshnote , an extradimensional guardian of realitynote , three fragments of a god that may or may not have been an aliennote , a guardian of the land that balances the powers of avatars of life and deathnote , and an extradimensional being fixated on consuming light to repair itselfnote , the type's legendaries get awfully eldritch.
  • Attack! Attack! Attack!: Almost all Dragon-type moves are attacks. Only one Dragon-type move is a status move (Dragon Dance), and it's a Status Buff that's offensively-minded.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • In the TCG. Possibly to give the type an "ultimate element" feel, Dragon-types almost always require two different Energy types to attack.
    • Dialga's Secret Art, Roar of Time, is a Hyper Beam clone. You should know by now why this is bad if you've read the rest of this page.
    • Dragon Rush is as powerful as Stone Edge and Earthquake but has less than perfect accuracy at 75% accuracy.
  • Breath Weapon:
  • Color-Coded Elements: A bright, vivid violet. In the TCG, the Dragon-type is represented as gold.
  • Confusion Fu: Their movepools range from "better than most" to "I have no idea what this thing is going to do to me, but it's probably going to suck".
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Dragon-type attacks were Special.
  • Dangerous Forbidden Technique:
    • Draco Meteor is almost as strong as Hyper Beam and doesn't have the recharge turn, but it lowers the user's Special Attack by 2 stages each time it's used.
    • Outrage is very strong, but forces the user to stay in battle without the option to switch out for 2-3 turns and inflicts Confusion on them when it finishes.
  • Dinosaurs Are Dragons: Many Dragon-types have characteristics of dinosaurs. Three of them — Tyrunt, Tyrantrum, and (if you choose to get technical) Altaria — actually are dinosaurs. Haxorus is stated to be based on herbivorous dinosaurs, though it also seems to be a bit of a Mix And Match Critter. Jangmo-o and its evolutions, Hakamo-o and Kommo-o, are said to be a cross between theropods and ankylosaurs. Gabite and Garchomp generally resemble dromaeosaurids. Also inverted with Pokemon who resemble dinosaurs or other prehistoric reptiles learning Dragon-type moves but not being Dragon-types themselves. Archeops and Aerodactyl are good examples.
  • Disc-One Nuke: Pokémon that know Dragon Rage at a low level have a great time if obtained early on, as the attack's guaranteed 40 damage will one-shot most Pokémon. As time passes and Pokémon increase in HP counts, the move will start to fall behind in damage output and will be shelved for stronger and more reliable moves.
  • Dragons Are Demonic: The Ghost/Dragon Giratina and the Dark/Dragon Hydreigon and Guzzlord are depicted as antagonistic creatures with sinister designs. Mega Charizard X has a demonic design, although it's of the Dark Is Not Evil variety.
  • Dragons Are Divine: Even outside of Legendaries, the type is revered as sacred by many groups of people.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Dragon
      • Weak: Steel
      • Can't Hit: Fairy
    • Defense
      • Strong: Electric, Fire, Grass, Water
      • Weak: Dragon, Fairy, Ice
  • Fake Balance: Between their massive movepools and above average stats, they could easily muscle through Steel- and Ice-types that were supposed to deal with them (they're both weak to Fire, which pretty much every Dragon can abuse since, you know, they're Dragons). The Fairy-type was introduced to alleviate this, especially since they aren't weak to Fire.
  • Fixed Damage Attack: Dragon Rage inflicts 40 damage to anything that isn't a Fairy-type. This was the only Dragon-type move in Generation I, meaning there was no way to inflict Dragon-type damage.
  • Infinity -1 Sword: Of the "pseudo-legendary" Pokémon note , six (out of eight) of them are Dragon-typed, the only exceptions being Tyranitar and Metagross. They're not legendary, but they're sure as strong as — or stronger than — some of them.
  • Infinity +1 Element: In the earlier games they were intended as this. Dragon-types tended to be very rare and either evolved from weak Pokémon that needed a lot of time and level grinding to raise, or were found in out-of-the-way locations, sometimes both. However, they were only weak to Ice and other Dragons, their moves only resisted by Steel-types, and many Dragons can learn Fire-type attacks for Steel-types anyway (which would also cover any Ice-types the opponent tried). They continued to be one of the best types of the game until Gen VI, in which Fairy-types were introduced to deal with them after Word of God admitted they were too strong and too common. Even then, the movepools and potential from most of the Dragon-types still allow them to face its tailor-made weakness using other means outside of their own element.
  • Instant Awesome: Just Add Dragons!: Dragon is often treated as one of the most special and powerful types in-universe. For example, it's Oda Nobunaga's type specialty in Pokémon Conquest. Many Legendary and pseudo-legendary Pokémon are Dragon-type as a testament to their power.
  • Kaiju: While no Pokémon is quite Kaiju-sized, this type tends to be pretty close in spirit, with many species being both physically imposing and able to deliver higly destructive attacks. The fact that, outside of Fairy Types, their best counter is another Dragon type is also reminiscent of Kaiju-on-Kaiju combat. Some are even directly reminiscent of specific Kaijus, like Hydreigon, based on King Ghidorah.
  • Last Disc Magic: Draco Meteor is only available during the late- or post-game, and can only be taught to Dragon-types with a maximum friendship rating.
  • Lightning Bruiser: They lean towards this, having brutal offensive power on top of generally good stats and awesome type effectiveness. Their sole status move (Dragon Dance) enhances the "lightning" and "bruiser" aspects of its wielder by boosting Attack and Speed.
  • Limit Break: The Dragon-type Z-Move is Devastating Drake, in which the user attacks the target with a huge, dragon-shaped aura that causes a massive explosion on impact.
  • Magic Knight: After dragons evolve into their final stage, most of them have almost equally high Attack and Special Attack stats, and their movepools usually expand to include an even ratio of physical and special attacks, while the previous stages are usually limited to mostly physical attacks.
  • Magikarp Power: Dragons evolve very late, are pretty weak in the first and second stages, and have limited movepools. By the time they reach their final stage (usually in the 40s or 50s), they become very powerful and gain many more options. Special mention goes to Deino, which evolves into Zweilous at level 50 and later into Hydreigon at level 64, later than any other Pokémon that evolves through leveling up.
  • Meteor Move: Gen VI's animation for Dragon Rush shows the user jumping in the air before slamming onto the target in a fiery crash. This is because the Japanese name of the move is Dragon Dive.
  • No-Holds-Barred Beatdown: Outrage, a move with a power of 120 that locks the user in for 2-3 turns and causes them to become confused.
  • Nerf: Most Dragons were hit by the introduction of the Fairy-type, which was the point of them in the first place. They can learn Steel-type and Poison-type moves to hit Fairies super effectively, however, though they rarely have occasion to due to the otherwise poor coverage of these attacks.
  • Non-Elemental: Not in terms of the attacks themselves, which tend to fall under Technicolor Fire, but their offensive type matchups. Dragon is strong against one type (itself), weak against another (Steel), and ineffective against a third (Fairy). This ties it with Normal for having the fewest non-neutral offensive matchups of any type, and Dragon-type attacks instead force foes to rely on high defensive stats instead of favorable Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors to take a hit.
  • Olympus Mons: From Generation III onwards, Dragon has been a pretty common type among newly introduced Legendary Pokémon; Sinnoh's and Unova's legendary trios are part Dragon-type.
  • Our Dragons Are Different: Dragon-types have all sorts of inspiration and basis, from classical Eastern or Western dragonsnote  to weirder but still recognizable dragonsnote  to real-world reptilesnote  to Mix-and-Match Critters with aspects of dragonsnote  to "out there" concepts that only vaguely resemble dragonsnote .
  • Overshadowed by Awesome: Some of the "weaker" Dragon types, like Flygon or Druddigon, are generally overlooked; they're still very strong and versatile Pokémon, but they just can't stack up against heavyweights like Garchomp or Haxorus.
  • Playing with Fire: Since dragons are traditionally associated with firenote , the majority of Dragon-types get Fire attacks, letting them bypass Steel-Types, the only thing that could wall them before the introduction of Fairies, and Ice-Types, the only other Type that hit them hard. Kingdra, Mega Sceptile, Latias, Latios, Zekrom, Kyuremnote  and Dragalge are the only Dragons that can't learn Fire attacks besides Hidden Power. Despite this, there are only three Fire/Dragon dual-types: Reshiram, Turtonator, and Mega Charizard X, the latter of which is the only one based on archetypical Western dragons.
  • Secret Art: Draco Meteor, which has a very high damage of 130 (140 prior to Gen VI), but lowers Special Attack by two stages per use. It can only be taught by special tutors to Dragon-types (and Arceus and Silvally), although Mega Charizard X, Mega Ampharos, Mega Sceptile and Ultra Necrozma can't learn it because they can only be accessed in battle.
  • Shoulder-Sized Dragon: Plenty of the first-stage Dragon-types are small enough to qualify, such as Dratini, Bagon, Gible, Axew, Deino, Goomy and Jangmo-o.
  • Slap-on-the-Wrist Nuke: Spacial Rend is described as tearing apart reality, and its Gen VI animation shows reality cracking like glass. In practice, it has 100 power and its only special effect is an increased chance to land a critical hit — strong, but nowhere near the destructive power it implies.
  • Space Master: Downplayed; Generation IV did most of the heavy lifting, creating Dragons with literally cosmic significance in Dialga, Palkia, and Giratina, and further introducing the ultimate Dragon-type move (barring Dialga's Secret Art) Draco Meteor. In Generation VI, using Camouflage in space will give the user the Dragon type.
  • Status Buff: Dragon Dance raises the user's Attack and Speed by one stage. In Generation VI, using the Camouflage move in space will change the user into a Dragon type.
  • Strong, but Unskilled: Most Dragon-type moves don't have secondary effects, but hit extremely hard (especially off of the Dragon-types' high stats) and are resisted by only 2 types to compensate for their lack of super effective coverage.
  • Super Mode: Altaria, Salamence, Latias, Latios, Rayquaza, and Garchomp are capable of Mega Evolution. Four non-Dragon-type Pokémon — Charizard, Ampharos, Sceptile and Necrozmanote  — become Dragon-type.
  • Switch-Out Move: Dragon Tail goes last, but forces the target to switch out when it hits.
  • Takes One to Kill One: The other type that is weak to itself. Before the introduction of Fairies, the best counter to a Dragon was (and still is, in some cases) usually a stronger and faster one, due to how incredibly powerful they tend to be.
  • Technicolor Fire: A lot of Dragon-type moves consist of green, blue, or purple colored fire.
  • The Hunter Becomes the Hunted: Pulled off by Dragalge and Naganadel against Fairy-types, which are normally the bane of dragons. Both are Poison/Dragon types, with Dragalge being a specialized Mighty Glacier and Naganadel being a specialized Fragile Speedster and as such can melt any Fairy that so much looks at them funny. The only other dragon that can do something similar is the legendary Dialga, who is a Steel/Dragon.
  • Tornado Move: Twister, which is a weak whirlwind attack. It may seem odd to be a Dragon-type move, but that's because the move's Japanese name contains tatsu (dragon). It can cause targets to flinch and strike targets in the semi-invulnerable turn of Fly (doing double damage in the process), but overall there's practically no point to using it instead Dragon Pulse or Draco Meteor.
  • Ultimate Life Form: Most of them have Pokédex entries that focus on how badass they are.
  • Underground Monkey: The Alolan Exeggutor is part Dragon-Type.
  • Uniqueness Decay: It was once only represented by the Dratini family in Generation I. Now there's a good selection to choose from, though they're still somewhat uncommon.
  • Unstoppable Rage: Outrage, which causes the user to go into a powerful frenzy for two to three turns, and then confuses them out of exhaustion. In-character, many Dragon-types are prone to this — even the friendly ones, like Dragonite, Goodra, and Drampa, are prone to wrecking everything in their way if they get pissed off. Drampa's pokedex entry even states it goes into a rage when children are harmed.

    Dark 

Dark-Type / Evil-Type (あくタイプ aku taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dark_types_gen_1_5.png

One of two types introduced in Pokémon Gold and Silver. In the original Japanese, they are known as the Aku type, which means "Evil", even though one of Pokémon's strict rules of canon is that no Pokémon is ever inherently evil, Dark-types included. Regardless, they usually have a very intimidating or even a brutal presence or are based on doom, trickery, crime, destruction, and below-the-belt fighting tactics.

They are largely a group of pragmatists, both tactically and otherwise. They can be found almost everywhere, as they are not united by an element of nature, but by the consistent traits of pragmatism and brutality. They are immune to Psychics and will wreck Ghost-types, but are weak against Fighting-types, Bug-types, and Fairy-types. As of Generation VII, they're immune to an opponent's status moves that get Action Initiative from Prankster.


  • Action Initiative:
    • Sucker Punch was until gen 7 (in which its power was reduced to 70) tied with Extreme Speed as the most powerful Priority Attack in the game (with Super Effective coverage, to boot!), but only works if the opponent uses a damaging move the same turn.
    • Pursuit strikes first when the opponent tries to switch, gaining the highest Priority value in the game in this situation.
    • Quash causes the target to always go last, but will only succeed if the user goes before the target.
  • Always Accurate Attack: Feint Attack is described as the user approaching disarmingly, then throwing a sucker punch (not to be confused with another Dark-type move of the same name) when the target doesn't expect it. With no chance to react or dodge, the attack ignores Accuracy and Evasion effects.
  • Always Chaotic Evil: Zig-Zagged, despite the Japanese name implying they are a group of Card Carrying Villains. It really depends on the species in question. Some, like Spiritomb and Malamar, are just as evil as the typing describes. Others, like Absol and Pangoro, are downright noble in comparison, while some, like Greninja and Incineroar represent pragmatic tactics and sneakiness more than blatant villainy (and the same can be said of their attacks in general). There are also more aggressive and predatory Dark-types like Mega Gyarados, Tyranitar, Hydreigon, and Krookodile.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Fling during the story mode of the games. Using Fling consumes the item that the user was holding, and the only items that have above average power are either impossible to get before the post-game or hard/expensive to reacquire due to their rarity (or in some cases only 1 of that item exists per save file). In Player Versus Player matches and the battle facilities like the Battle Tower. it's less of an issue, as consumed items are given back after each match, but you can still only use it once per match.
    • Using Fling with an Iron Ball gives it a Power of 130 with no accuracy downside. However, holding an Iron Ball cuts the user's Speed in half and negates any Ground immunity they might have (which also makes them susceptible to Spikes, Toxic Spikes, and Sticky Web). All for a move that's single-use, unless the user also knows Recycle.
    • Power Trip increases in power the more status buffs the user has, but getting to that point takes a long time, and it starts out with a measly base power of 20.
  • Balance Buff: Most Dark-types have higher Attack than Special Attack, but previously all Dark-type attacks were classified as Special moves. Gen IV's move split gave them physical Dark moves to put their best stats to proper use.
  • The Brute: When they're not Combat Pragmatists, they tend to be this, with Tyranitar and Guzzlord being prime examples.
  • Card-Carrying Villain: Subverted. While they're literally called the Evil-type in Japan, they aren't actually evil for the most part, just pragmatic or Jerkasses.
  • Casting a Shadow:
    • Downplayed, contrary to their English name. They mostly focus on pragmatic tactics and characterization, with only 3 moves — two of which are Secret Arts of specific species — involving any sort of darkness-controlling prowess.
    • The Dark-type Z-Move also falls into this more than it does pragmatism, as it takes the form of a black hole that consumes the opponent.
  • Color-Coded Elements: The Dark-type icon is a very dark, grayish brown.
  • Combat Pragmatist: This is their gimmick, not dark powers; Dark-types rely on trickery, sneakiness, and general dirty fighting to win. Their moves involve taunting the opponent to make them angry or confuse them, using a Wounded Gazelle Gambit to attack when the opponent isn't ready, literal Back Stabbing, biting the enemy, chopping them in the throat to prevent them from making any noise, and manipulating the enemy's held item. Generation VI's Greninja is a very good example, in that its Dark typing simply comes from its being a Ninja and using sneaky techniques rather than using dark powers or having a vicious/cruel nature. Incineroar is based on a heel wrestler and fights dirty in any way possible, but subverted in that it actually is all just the act of a performer.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Dark-type attacks were Special.
  • Dark Is Evil: Zigzagged. It's called the Evil-type in Japanese versions and, in general, Dark-types aren't nice guys (there are exceptions, such as Absol) however, see below.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: The type is called "Evil" in Japan, but many of them are portrayed as simply being misunderstood, or enjoying harmless mischief; Greninja, one of the most famous Dark-types, is neither, as it's usually depicted as a heroic Combat Pragmatist ninja. Incineroar, meanwhile, plays up its jerkassery as part of its Heel motif.
  • Double Tap: Assurance deals double damage if the target has already been hurt during the same turn. Its Japanese name translates to "Make Sure," which, given the Dark-type preference for underhanded tactics, implies that the doubled damage comes from hitting the target exactly where they were hit the first time.
  • The Drag-Along: There's a small subset of Pokémon that begin with 35 base friendship rather than 70 when you capture them in the wild — in other words, they're significantly less happy to join up with you than ordinary Pokémon (though you'll still win them over through dedication and care). Dark- and Ghost-types jointly make up a major chunk of this group.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Ghost, Psychic
      • Weak: Dark, Fairy, Fighting, Steel (Gen II-V)
    • Defense
      • Strong: Dark, Ghost
      • Weak: Bug, Fairy, Fighting
      • Immune: Psychic
  • Evil Makes You Ugly: In contrast to their Fairy-type foils, Dark-types aren't exactly pretty-looking, perhaps to add to their intimidating appearance. Quite a few Dark-Types in particular possess the Intimidate ability, which lowers the attack of the opponent when they enter battle.
  • Evil Wears Black: Well, they are the Evil-type in Japanese, and most of them are black in color.
  • Game-Breaking Bug:
    • In Platinum, HeartGold, and SoulSilver, if Pursuit KOed a Pokémon that switched out while certain battle conditions were in effect, a bizarre glitch occurred that caused all weather to take effect at once. This also caused every Pokémon except Swinub, Piloswine, and Mamoswinenote  to take damage at the end of every turn four times, with the damage apparently caused by their Ability. Bothersome enough, but if Cherrim or Castform was sent into battle, they kept switching between forms indefinitely until the game was turned off.
    • Early in the life of Sun and Moon, the moves Parting Shot and Memento could cause crashes on Battle Spot if the Z-Move versions of them were used. These moves were temporarily banned until some time after the issue was fixed.
  • Glass Cannon: Somewhere between this and Fragile Speedsters, as they are good at "sweeping" teams, but rarely have good defense, with a few Mighty Glaciers (most famously Tyranitar) and Stone Walls in there.
  • Healing Shiv: Using Fling with a Mental Herb or White Herb will cure the target of infatuation and stat debuffs, respectively. You can also fling Berries to apply their restorative effects. The Z-move variations of Memento and Parting Shot will heal the next Pokémon swapped in.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: The user of Brutal Swing swings its body violently around the field, hitting all adjacent Pokémon.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Foul Play uses the target's attack stat (and any boosts they have) to deal damage, while Punishment does more damage the more Status Buffs the target has.
  • Impossible Thief: Snatch can steal opponents' Status Buffs and healing, but only if used on the same turn the opponent buffs/heals themselves.
  • Impromptu Tracheotomy: Throat Chop deals pretty heavy damage for a Dark-type move and prevents the opponent from using sound-based attacks for 2 turns.
  • Improvised Weapon: Fling has the user throw their currently held item at the foe to deal damage (and possibly inflict a secondary effect depending on the item). Flinging an Iron Ball has the highest Power of all Dark-Type attacks (130), but It Only Works Once as the item is lost after that, unless you also know the move Recycle.
  • I Shall Taunt You: Almost all moves that could be classified as Practical Taunts (i.e. Taunt, Torment, and Flatter) are of the Dark type. (Swagger is the exception — it's a Normal-type move.)
  • Jerkass: Evil or not, practically every member of this type is a jerk in some fashion or another.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Some of them fit this too. Umbreon evolves with high friendship, Pangoro hunts down and fights bullies, and Absol goes out of its way to warn people of disasters. Incineroar is based on a Heel Wrestler and fights dirty in any way possible in the ring, but it's all part of the act and it actually enjoys admiration from children.
  • Killing Intent: Dark Pulse is described as the user projecting an aura imbued with horrible thoughts at the target that has a chance of making them flinch. Nasty Plot is described as the user stimulating its brain by thinking bad thoughts.
  • Limit Break: The Dark-type Z-Move is Black Hole Eclipse, in which the user creates a black hole and sucks the target into it.
  • Like Cannot Cut Like: Dark-type Pokémon resists Dark attacks.
  • Lost in Translation:
    • The type's name itself is originally called the "Evil"-type, hence why they mostly lack darkness-related powers outside a few like Dark Pulse and Dark Void.
    • The move "Sucker Punch" is not buffed by the ability Iron Fist (buffs punch-based moves) because its original Japanese name means "Surprise Attack" (which is what a sucker punch is in American slang: an unexpected, often underhanded movenote ).
    • Somewhat of an example with Night Slash; its Japanese name, Tsujigiri (sometimes translated as "crossroad killing"), refers to an old samurai practice of testing out a new weapon or fighting style by hiding at a crossroads at night and attacking the first defenseless passerby they saw. While its English name and description are still true to the spirit of the original, the reference to feudal Japan was removed, and most international players would probably interpret it as "Sucker Punch with a blade" or a "dark energy-infused Slash" (which could be interpreted as such in certain animations).
  • Magically Inept Fighter: Not to the same extent as the Fighting type, and certain offensively inclined Darks like Hydreigon and Zoroark, as well as Dark Legendaries, are just as effective on the special side if not more so. However, most Dark-types tend to favor Attack over Special Attack. The list of Dark-type attacks supports this, as only three are Special attacks, with one being Zoroark's Night Daze.
  • Make Me Wanna Shout: The move Snarl deals damage by having the user "[yell] as if it is ranting about something."
  • Man Bites Man: Bite and Crunch are both Dark-type attacks. The former was a Normal-type move until it was retconnned into the Dark-type.
  • Manipulative Bastard: The more cunning Dark-types are good at using psychological warfare, incorporating it into their fighting style, with such attacks as Flatter, Torment, Taunt, and Fake Tears. As of Generation VII, they're immune to Prankster-boosted priority, most probably because they're used to such trickery.
  • Mechanically Unusual Class: Many of their attacks have unique effects, often fitting their pragmatic nature. Sucker Punch is an attack that moves first, but only if the opponent uses an attacking move; Parting Shot lowers the opponent's Attack and Special Attack then switches your Pokémon; Foul Play deals damage calculating the opponent's Attack stat instead of the user's, and so forth.
  • Mechanically Unusual Fighter: Dark-type attacks don't do much damage offensively due to low power. However, they have a ton of status attacks, including Parting Shot, Torment, Snatch, and Quash. Even their damaging attacks tend to work oddly; Sucker Punch only hits if the opponent is using a damaging attack, Foul Play calculates damage using the opponent's Attack instead of the user's, Payback doubles in power if the user moves second, and so forth.
  • Mooks: Alongside the Poison-type, they're the favored Mons of low-level henchmen for the various villainous teams, essentially making them the Mooks' Mooks.
  • Nocturnal Mooks: In Gen II, most Dark-types could only be obtained at night, never appearing in the wild in the day.
  • Obvious Rule Patch:
    • They were introduced in Gold and Silver as a direct response to the then-powerful Psychic-type.
    • The Physical/Special split made almost every Dark-type move Physical so that the type (which predominately consists of Physical Attackers) could actually use their own STAB.
  • Power Up Letdown: The above Obvious Rule Patch ended up not working as well as intended because this trope also came into effect. On their introduction, Dark-type attacks were all classified as Special Attacks, which meant Dark-types wanted to run physical moves, but their STAB moves were Special Attacks, which they weren't so good in. It didn't help that many Psychic-types take special attacks better than physical ones. Gen IV's split reclassified all previously existing Dark-type moves as Physical, further suggesting that Dark should have been considered a Physical type in the first place.
  • Predators Are Mean: Kind of. Despite being the EVIL type in the original language, Dark-types can be just as heroic as any other type the trainer chooses. However, many Dark-types are jerks, or at least more aggressive than other types, to varying degrees, and the majority of them are predators. The exceptions are scavengers (Honchkrow and Mandibuzz lines,) herbivores (Pangoro line,) and the Dark/Ghost dual-types (Sableye eats gemstones, and Spiritomb doesn't technically need food to begin with.)
  • Retcon:
    • The move Bite was retconned from a Normal-type move into a Dark-type move in Generation II.
    • When the Physical/Special split happened, every Dark-type attack that existed beforehand were changed to be Physical attacks.
  • Rouge Angles of Satin: Feint Attack is named Faint Attack prior to Gen VI, which doesn't make sense since the latter implies a Wounded Gazelle Gambit, an "I'm Taking You with Me" attack, or a One-Hit Kill (since Pokémon that are unable to battle are said to have fainted). It's none of those things.
    • Or just an attack that's indistinct and hard to see.
  • Situational Damage Attack:
    • Pursuit is normally weak with a Power of 40, but it deals double damage if the target tries to switch out manually or is using the moves U-turn, Volt Switch or Parting Shot (the latter only if the user of Pursuit moves after the user of those moves, however).
    • Payback's Power of 50 will double if the user goes after the target. In the Generation IV games, switching out counted as going first for this purpose.
    • Assurance is mediocre with a Power of 60, but that will double if the target has already taken damage that turn.
    • The Power of Punishment starts off at 60, but increases by 20 for every stage of Status Buff the target has, reaching a max power of 200.
    • From X and Y onward, Knock Off's Power of 65 increases by 50% if the target was holding an item that can be removed.
    • Power Trip's Base Power starts off at a measly 20, but its power is increased by 20 the more positive stat increases the user has. With everything at the maximum (six stat increases for all seven stats that can be increased), the move's base power becomes 860, the highest of all physical moves.
  • Situational Sword: Many of their attacks will fail completely or do weak damage unless certain conditions are met. For example, Sucker Punch will only deal damage if the target uses a damaging attack on the same turn and doesn't go before the user.
  • Sneak Attack: Sucker Punch is called "Surprise Attack" in Japan. Feint Attack and Night Slash both are described as hitting the opponent when their guard is down.
  • Standard Status Effects: Using Fling with certain items can inflict status aliments with a 100% success rate, with the status inflicted being dependent on what item is thrown. A Flame Orb will inflict Burn, a Poison Barb will inflict normal Poison, a Toxic Orb will inflict Toxic Poison, a Light Ball will inflict Paralysis, and a King's Rock or Razor Fang will cause the target to flinch.
  • Status Buff:
    • Nasty Plot boosts the user's Special Attack by two stages.
    • Hone Claws increases the user's Attack and Accuracy by one stage.
  • Super Mode: Houndoom, Tyranitar, Sableye, Sharpedo, and Absol are capable of Mega Evolution. The Water/Flying-type Gyarados becomes Water/Dark-type when it Mega Evolves. Greninja can transform into Ash-Greninja if it has the Battle Bond ability.
  • Switch-Out Move: Parting Shot gives a parting threat, lowering the target's Attack and Special Attack before the user switches out.
  • Toxic Friend Influence: If a Pancham is in a team with a Dark-type when it levels up, then the latter's bad behavior will rub off on it and it'll evolve into Pangoro, who is a Dark-type itself.
  • Underground Monkey: The Alolan Rattata and Alolan Grimer and their evolved forms are part Dark-Types while Alolan Meowth and Alolan Persian are pure Dark-Types.
  • Useless Useful Spell: Prior to the Physical/Special split in Diamond and Pearl, all Dark-type moves were Special while almost every Dark-type was a Physical attacker.
  • Video Game Stealing:
    • Thief deals damage and steals any item an opponent is holding if the user is not holding one.
    • Knock Off removes items that can be removed and (as of X and Y) gets a 50% damage boost when the item is successfully removed. It will not gain a power boost if the item cannot be removed (such as a Pokémon holding a Mega Stone, Z-Crystal or an Arceus/Silvally holding a Plate/Memory).
    • Snatch steals and uses any Status moves the opponent tried to use that turn and prevents them from using it.
    • Switcheroo is exactly like Trick, swapping the target's and user's items.
  • Weak, but Skilled:
    • In terms of damaging moves, the Dark type's strongest attacks are Crunch and Dark Pulse (excluding signature moves), which rest at a good-but-not-great 80 base power. Regular moves that go above that mark are invariably situational damage attacks when used to their full Combat Pragmatist potential, so as a result, the Dark type's hardest-hitting moves are ones that seem initially weak but provide increased power when used smartly.
    • Even its status moves fall under this category, as many of them don't seem immediately helpful, but can turn a match around when used skillfully. Most Dark-type status moves are geared toward shutting down specific tactics (for example, Torment prevents repeated use of the same move, while Taunt, Snatch and Topsy-Turvy address an opponent's use of non-damaging moves), but those mechanics also tend to make them ineffective when used without strategy.
    • Hone Claws boosts Attack by one stage, making it a poor choice for aggressive play, but it also provides a hard-to-find boost to Accuracy, which can allow users to reliably incorporate inaccurate moves into their strategy, such as Stone Edge. It's also a good choice for any Pokémon with the ability Hustle, which decreases the accuracy of their physical moves by 20%.
  • You Will Not Evade Me: Pursuit deals double damage to opponents attempting to switch out and hits them before they can switch. Handy for punishing fragile Psychic- and Ghost-Types that may try to get away.
  • Zerg Rush: Beat Up has the user attack once for each conscious party member that is not afflicted by a status condition, up to 6 times.

    Steel 

Steel-Type (はがねタイプ hagane taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/steel_types.png

The second of two types added with Pokémon Gold and Silver, they are the most defensive type in the game. The strong metal that covers the bodies of Steel-type Pokémon grants them high defenses and a great number of resistances. While weak to Fighting, Fire, and Ground, they resist everything else (except Water and Electric and Ghost and Dark as of Gen VI) and are immune to one type (Poison). Offensively, they hit Ice-, Rock-, and Fairy-Types hard but are resisted by other Steel-, Water-, Electric-, and Fire-Types. Most Pokémon of this type have the theme of armoring or being a creature of living metal, though there are some that don't really fit the bill beyond possessing thick hides. Steel-types can be found in caves, mountain regions, and urban areas.

When a sandstorm is in effect, Steel-type Pokémon do not take residual damage from it.


  • Action Initiative: Bullet Punch has increased priority. Notably, more Fighting-types learn this move than Steel-types.
  • Always Accurate Attack:
    • Magnet Bomb, an attack that uses homing metal chunks, never misses regardless of accuracy or evasion. Magnet-based Pokémon like the Magnemite line and Probopass get this move.
    • Smart Strike, a TM where the user stabs the opponent with an accurate horn.
  • Anchors Away: The move Anchor Shot, exclusive to Dhelmise, deals Steel-type damage and traps the foe under an anchor.
  • Animate Inanimate Object: Quite a few Steel-types are based on objects, such as the Magnemite, Beldum, Bronzor, Klink, and Honedge lines.
  • Armor-Piercing Attack: Doom Desire ignores the moves Protect, Detect, and Endure, and it hits through the Ability Wonder Guard.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Doom Desire takes two turns before the attack actually hits, which is more than enough time to switch out to something that can tank the hit.
    • Iron Tail has great power (100, which is on par with Earthquake), can be taught to a wide variety of Pokémon, and can raise the user's Defense as a bonus. It has a less than perfect accuracy of 75% and many of the Pokémon that learn it have other moves with better coverage and accuracy.
  • Balance Buff: Steel-types weren't very useful for attacking prior to Gen VI; they only did super-effective damage to Ice and Rock, which had plenty of other type weaknesses to exploit (including both being weak to Fighting). Gen VI added Fairies to give Steel-types more use.
  • Chrome Champion: Steel-types often look like they're covered in gleaming silver metal or are actually made of it. Several physical Steel-type move such, as Metal Claw and Iron Head, cause the user to glow silver metallic for a brief second regardless of their actual type and/or appearance.
  • Cold Iron: Likely the reason they are super-effective against Fairies is to invoke the idea.
  • Color-Coded Elements: The Steel-type color is silver, as is the metal armor of many of its members.
  • Counter Attack: Metal Burst will deal damage to the opponent equal to 1.5 times the amount the user took that turn. Unlike Counter and Mirror Coat, it doesn't have negative priority, so make sure that the user is slower than the opponent before using it.
  • Damage Typing: Prior to Diamond and Pearl, all Steel-type attacks dealt Physical damage.
  • Discard and Draw: In Generation VI, they became super effective against Fairy-types and resist their moves, but lost their resistances to Dark- and Ghost-type attacks.
  • Dub-Induced Plot Hole: Meteor Mash is boosted by Iron Fist (which boosts the power of 'punch' moves by 20%, though no Pokémon with Iron Fist can learn Meteor Mash) because its Japanese name is "Comet Punch" (not to be confused with the move called "Comet Punch" in the English versions, which is named "Consecutive Punch" in Japanese).
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Fairy, Ice, Rock
      • Weak: Electric, Fire, Steel, Water
    • Defense
      • Strong: Bug, Dark (Gen II-V), Dragon, Fairy, Flying, Ghost (Gen II-V), Grass, Ice, Normal, Psychic, Rock, Steel
      • Weak: Fighting, Fire, Ground
      • Immune: Poison
  • Extra-ore-dinary: The type isn't much in the way of ferrokinesis so much as it is "hit the target with a protrusion covered in metal". They tend to prefer relying on their defenses, as until the Fairy-type was introduced, the only types they were good against had easier-to-exploit weaknesses.
  • Goomba Stomp: Heavy Slam deals Steel-type damage depending on how heavy the target is compared to the user; the heavier the user is, the more damage dealt. Considering that most Pokémon who get this are on the heavy side, it tends to hurt a lot.
  • Heavily Armored Mook: Quite a number of Pokémon that gain the Steel-type on evolving also gain a good increase in defenses. Steelix is a notable example.
  • Horn Attack: Smart Strike, an Always Accurate Attack where the user stabs its opponent with a sharp horn. It's a TM that can appropriately be taught to most Pokémon with horns.
  • Kill It with Fire: One of their weaknesses is to the Fire-type.
  • Light 'em Up: All three Special Steel-type moves (Doom Desire, Flash Cannon, and Mirror Shot) involve firing out light energy.
  • Limit Break: The Steel-type Z-Move is Corkscrew Crash, in which the user spins really fast and rams into the target.
  • Like Cannot Cut Like: One of the many types Steel resists against is themselves.
  • Mechanical Lifeforms: Those that put the extra emphasis on Steel, like Magnemite, Metagross, and Klinklang.
  • Mighty Glacier:
    • If a Steel-type is not purely defensive, it will often be slow and quite strong.
    • The move Gyro Ball exploits this; the slower the user is than the foe, the more damage it will do. The Ultra Beast Stakataka — with its Rock/Steel-typing, high Attack, and painfully slow Speed — can dish out some very devastating Gyro Balls. And Trick Room (which inverts Speed) doesn't cut into the move's power, either.
  • Nerf: In Pokémon X and Y, they lost their resistances to Dark and Ghost.
  • Retcon: Magnemite and Magneton were given a secondary Steel-type in Generation II.
  • Secret Art:
    • Doom Desire, a move only known by Jirachi.
    • The abilities Light Metal and Heavy Metal halves and doubles the user's weight, respectively.
    • Magnet Pull increases the encounter rate of Steel-types in the wild and prevents them from switching or fleeing.
    • Despite not being used by a Steel-type, the ability Steelworker essentially provides STAB bonus to Steel-type attacks.
  • Shed Armor, Gain Speed: Autotomize causes the user shed part of their armored body in order to lighten themselves and sharply increase speed.
  • Silicon-Based Life: Quite a number of Steel-types fall into this category, especially the ones who are part Rock or Ground.
  • Status Buff:
    • Iron Defense raises the user's defense by two stages.
    • Autotomize raises the user's speed by 2 stages while reducing their weight by 100 kg.
    • Shift Gear raises the user's speed by two levels while raising attack by one.
    • Metal Claw, Steel Wing, and Meteor Mash all have a chance of raising the user's stats in addition to dealing damage. This is notable because outside of the Jirachi-exclusive Doom Desire, these three moves constituted 75% of the type's attacking moves as of Generation III.
  • Stone Wall: There are outliers, like Excadrill, but the Steel-type's many resistances and few uses as an attacking type compliment this strategy. To counteract the type's high defenses and resistances, Steel-type Pokémon tend to have average or below-average HP.
  • Strong Flesh, Weak Steel: The inorganic and sometimes mechanical Steel-types are weak to the mostly organic physical-brawling Fighting-types.
  • Super Mode: Steelix, Scizor, Mawile, Aggron, Metagross, and Lucario are capable of Mega Evolution. Aggron becomes a pure Steel-type.
  • Super Toughness: Steel-types resist over half the types in the game and have strong enough defenses to easily shrug them off.
  • This Is a Drill: The Steel-type Z-move, Corkscrew Crash, involves the user slamming into the target while spinning like a drill.
  • Thunderbolt Iron: Some Steel-types such as Registeel and Jirachi are heavily implied to be made out of metal that's not of this world.
  • Underground Monkey: The Alolan Diglett and Alolan Sandshrew families are part Steel-Type.
  • Use Your Head: How Iron Head works.
  • Weak to Fire: One of Steel's three weaknesses is Fire. This allowed a lot of Dragons to use Fire-type moves to burn through Steels. This was a contributing factor in the creation of the last type, Fairy.
  • You Will Not Evade Me:
    • The Ability Magnet Pull can trap Pokémon and prevent them from fleeing or switching, but only if they're Steel-type. The Steel/Ghost-type Honedge line is immune to this due to Ghosts being immune to trapping effects.
    • The move Anchor Shot prevents the target it hits from switching.

    Fairy 

Fairy-Type (フェアリータイプ fearii taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fairy_types.png

The newest type, introduced in Pokémon X and Y. Introduced to combat the growing power of the Dragon-Type, Fairy-Type Pokémon represent practically every cultures' interpretation of The Fair Folk (whether it's the cute, harmless, benevolent sprites or the more mischievous, often meaner tricksters). Sprites, cute critters, and mystical otherworldly beings often represent the type. Despite their adorable appearances, they're effective against the more "hardcore" Pokémon.

Fairy is a highly effective type, both offensively and defensively. It resists Dark, Fighting, Bug and is immune to Dragon, and is only weak to Steel and Poison. Offensively it's just as good, hitting Fighting-, Dragon-, and Dark-Types super effectively while being resisted by Poison, Steel, and Fire. The things holding them back are their relative scarcity, lack of heavy hitters compared to other types, and the fact that they are commonly slow and can't take physical hits very well.


  • Always Accurate Attack: Disarming Voice bypasses accuracy and evasion modifiers when used.
  • Badass Adorable: Their proclivity for cute designs only belies their true power as fighters, particularly against Dragon-types.
  • Beauty Equals Goodness: Fairy-Types are generally very charming and attractive, like Gardevoir, Florges, and Primarina, and they have the appropriate benevolence to associate with their beauty/cuteness. The few exceptions of Not-Good Fairy-types, like Shiinotic, are more freakish and alien-looking.
  • Big Ball of Violence: Play Rough is depicted as this, with hearts and stars coming out of a cloud obscuring the beatdown. It's also the only Physical Fairy-type move as of Gen VII.
  • Blow You Away: The move Fairy Wind deals damage by hitting the target with a fairy wind.
  • Cast from Hit Points: The Dummied Out Light of Ruin deals damage to the user equal to 1/2 of the damage dealt to the target.
  • Cold Iron: They are weak to Steel-Type attacks.
  • Color-Coded Elements: The Fairy-type coloring is light pink, and several Fairies are also pink.
  • The Dragonslayer: Every single one of them, owing to their tremendous advantage over the Dragon-type.
  • Dummied Out: A powerful Fairy-type move called Light of Ruin can be called by Metronome and its name appears in the Hotel Richissime room service minigame, but can't be learned by anything currently officially available in the games. In terms of brute force, it's the strongest Fairy-type attack and it also happens to be the only special attack with recoil. It's actually the Secret Art of AZ's Floette, which has been unreleased in any game but has existed in the game code ever since Pokémon X and Y.
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors
    • Offense
      • Strong: Dark, Dragon, Fighting
      • Weak: Fire, Poison, Steel
    • Defense
      • Strong: Bug, Dark, Fighting
      • Weak: Poison, Steel
      • Immune: Dragon
  • The Fair Folk: They have elements of this, particularly with Mawile and the mischievous Klefki, but overall lean towards the modern, more positive interpretation of fairies as benevolent nature spirits or harmless pranksters. The Tapus (island guardians) of Alola play this somewhat straighter; they're depicted as tiki-like guardian deities, but have morality that doesn't fall within human standards.
    • Shiinotic plays this completely straight, luring travelers into the woods with its glowing lights so it can put them to sleep and feed on their energy.
  • Field Power Effect: They learn several moves meant to manipulate the environment, including Misty Terrain, Flower Shield, and Xerneas's signature Geomancy.
  • Healing Shiv: Floral Healing, which becomes even more effective at healing in Grassy Terrain.
  • Heart Beat-Down: Some of the moves, most notably Sweet Kiss and Disarming Voice.
  • Killer Rabbit: Most Fairy-Types are both very cute-looking and surprisingly powerful battlers. Azumarill is a literal example, being a deceptively powerful rabbit thanks to Huge Power.
  • Kiss of Death: Draining Kiss involves the user kissing the target, causing damage and stealing some HP.
  • Life Drain: Draining Kiss heals the user for 75% of the damage it dealt.
  • Light 'em Up: The Fairy-type is as close to a Light-type that the Pokémon series gets - along with being associated with bright pink, their moves tend to have a light motif, especially Dazzling Gleam, Fleur Cannon, Moonblast, Moonlight and the aforementioned Light of Ruin.
  • Light Is Good: Most Fairy-types are almost universally bright and colorful in design, and on the whole are quite benevolent with few exceptions. They also oppose the Dark-Type, being both super effective and resistant to Dark-Type attacks.
  • Light Is Not Good: However, Fairy-type includes Shiinotic and the Tapus who are more malicious and have morality beyond human and Pokémon understanding, respectively.
  • Limit Break: The Fairy-type Z-Move is Twinkle Tackle, in which the user creates a charming space and toys with the target.
  • Lunacy: They have a lunar motif in their moves Moonblast and Moonlight, the latter of which was Retconned in as a Fairy-type move. The lunar motif may have been influenced by the Clefable line, an evolutionary line that was the original fairy themed Pokémon and had a strong association with the moon. The line became Fairy-type upon the new type's introduction.
  • Make Me Wanna Shout:
    • Disarming Voice is a sound-based attack, though its damage-dealing ability is more due to inflicting "emotional damage" than the power of the sound itself.
    • Every Pokémon that can have the Pixilate Ability is capable of learning Hyper Voice, which can deal serious damage thanks to Pixilate's power boost and the STAB bonus from it.
  • Mighty Glacier: Most Fairy-Types are slow, but can usually take a hit and hit back hard.
  • Obvious Rule Patch: They were introduced to curb the Dragon-type, as Game Freak thought they had made it too powerful. They also give Poison and Steel more offensive uses, as both of them were pretty much only used for their defensive capabilities beforehand.
  • Our Fairies Are Different: The basis for Fairy-types can include all kinds of spirits, sprites, deities, and cute critters alike.
  • Percent Damage Attack: Nature's Madness cuts the target's current HP in half, like Super Fang. The Z-move Guardian of Alola cuts the target's current HP by 75%.
  • Puppy-Dog Eyes: The Baby-Doll Eyes move, which lowers the opponent's Attack and is a first-strike move.
  • Retcon: When the type was introduced, a fair number of older Pokémon were changed to be at least part Fairy. In the case of the Togepi, Clefairy, and Snubbull families, they're now pure Fairy-Types (they were Normal-Types before). Compared to the Dark- and Steel-types, no Pokémon gained the Dark-type and only two (Magnemite and Magneton) gained a Steel-type in Generation II. The moves Charm, Sweet Kiss, and Moonlight were also retconned to be Fairy.
  • Secret Art:
    • Pixilate turns Normal-type moves into Fairy-type and boosts them by 20% (30% in Gen VI).
    • Misty Terrain protects all Pokémon on the ground from Standard Status Effects. It also reduces damage taken from Dragon-type attacks by 50%.
  • Status Buff:
    • The move Geomancy sharply raises the user's Special Attack, Special Defense and Speed, but takes two turns to activate.
    • The move Aromatic Mist raises the Special Defense of an ally by 1 stage.
    • The ability Flower Shield raises the Defense of all Grass-type Pokémon in the battle.
  • Super Cute Super Powers: Quite a few Fairy-type moves are based on cuteness, such as Charm, Sweet Kiss, Baby-doll Eyes, and Disarming Voice.
  • Super Mode: Gardevoir, Mawile, and Diancie are capable of Mega Evolution. Altaria and Audino become part Fairy-type when they Mega Evolve.
  • A Twinkle in the Sky: The Fairy-type Z-Move Twinkle Tackle rams the opponent into the sky, wherein it disappears leaving only an audible twinkle behind.
  • Underground Monkey: Alolan Ninetales are part Fairy-Type.
  • Weaksauce Weakness: Being a type that No Sells Dragon attacks and has a lot of other resistances, Fairy-type Pokémon are weak against Poison and Steel, known for having weak offensive presence; the former being the weakest Pokémon type since Gen I.
  • White Mage: Over half of all Fairy-type moves are status moves. Buff one's own stats? Debuff an opponent? Buff an ally's stats? Heal oneself? Heal an ally? Block all status moves used against your team? Block all Standard Status Effects from the entire field? Fairies can do all of this.

Spin-Off Exclusive Types

    Shadow 

Shadow-Type / Dark-Type (ダークタイプ daaku taipu)

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/shadow_lugia_4.png
Exclusive to spin-off titles Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness, Shadow Pokémon are the end product of a scientific and magical process that's created by the top scientists of Cipher to remove all emotions from Pokémon. These Pokémon have no compunction about attacking Pokémon and people, which makes them the perfect weapons for Cipher's crimes. Much to the displeasure of the denizens of Orre, Shadow Pokémon became popular among the criminal underground. Some trainers who own Shadow Pokémon don't even know they have them. Only people with certain tools and psychic abilities can identify a Shadow Pokémon by its shadowy aura. Shadow Pokémon can be reverted back into normal Pokémon by bonding with its trainer, which is one of the main objectives of the Colosseum series. Cipher and the threat of Shadow Pokémon were stopped thanks to the protagonists of the two games, but it's hinted that Cipher is planning a comeback.

In Colosseum, Shadow isn't so much a type as it is a classification. It doesn't change a Pokémon's strengths or weaknesses in the Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors, and its only move at the time (Shadow Rush) is a physical move that deals neutral damage to everything.

XD: Gale of Darkness revamps Shadow to be an actual type and provides it with more moves, though it is unique in that it acts as a third type (or second if a Shadow Pokémon only has one type normally) and doesn't provide a Same-Type Attack Bonus to its attacks. All Shadow-type attacks are also now super effective on all normal Pokémon, but they are resisted by other Shadow Pokémon.

Unlike other types at the time, whose moves were fixed as Physical or Special, Shadow-type moves in XD: Gale of Darkness can be either. This predates the Physical/Special split of moves introduced into the main series games in Pokémon Diamond and Pearl.


  • Ax-Crazy: In Hyper Mode, a Shadow Pokémon may attack its teammate, its own Trainer, or the opposing Trainer.
  • Bad Powers, Good People: In the hands of the player these Pokémon are still dangerous, but their power is focus on the forces of Cipher.
  • Blow You Away: Shadow Blast, the Shadow version of Lugia's Aeroblast and Shadow Lugia's signature move.
  • Can't Catch Up: When caught, a Shadow Pokémon cannot level up, evolve, or learn new moves until it's purified, at which point it'll automatically gain the experience back. Try training one early in the game, and the Shadow Pokémon you caught in the last town will stop being useful quickly and become dead weight in a major battle until you gain the ability to fully purify them.
  • Cast from Hit Points: Shadow Rush (Colosseum only) and Shadow End cause recoil damage to the user. Rush has 1/4 recoil while End has 1/2.
  • The Corruption: They are created by robbing emotions from Pokémon to turn them into soulless fighting machines.
  • Dark Is Evil: Shadow Pokémon are corrupted beings that need to be restored to their true selves.
  • Dub Name Change: They're called "Dark Pokemon" in the Japanese version, but were changed to "Shadow Pokémon" to avoid confusion with the Dark-type (which is called the Evil-type in Japan).
  • Empty Shell: The creation of Shadow Pokémon involves removing their emotions.
  • Evil Knockoff: Shadow Chill, Shadow Bolt, Shadow Fire, and Shadow Blast are corrupted versions of Ice Beam, Thunderbolt, Flamethrower, and Aeroblast, respectively.
  • Fire/Ice/Lightning: Shadow Bolt, Shadow Chill, and Shadow Fire. Respectively the signature moves of the corrupted Zapdos, Articuno, and Moltres.
  • Heel–Face Turn: A Shadow Pokémon experiences one after being purified.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: Shadow Down, Shadow Hold, Shadow Mist, Shadow Panic, Shadow Rave, Shadow Storm, and Shadow Wave hit all enemies while Shadow Half and Shadow Shed hit everyone on the field.
  • Infinity +1 Element: In an Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors sense. Shadow is super effective against every other type in XD and only resisted by itself.
  • Invisible to Normals: The shadowy aura surrounding a Shadow Pokémon can only be seen by very few people or those with special technology.
  • Mind Rape: In the words of Ein, Cipher's head scientist, Shadow Pokémon are born by "closing the door to a Pokémon's heart." The fact that they are willing to attack anyone only adds to this.
  • No Cure for Evil: There are no "positive support" Shadow moves.
  • Olympus Mons: Not even legendaries are safe from becoming Shadow Pokémon, as players will eventually encounter Shadow Articuno, Zapdos, Moltres, Raikou, Entei, and Suicune. However, there's one special Shadow legendary Pokémon: Shadow Lugia. Considered the ultimate Shadow Pokémon, Shadow Lugia looks very different compared to normal Lugia with its reversed color scheme and other details. It's also nearly immune to purification, as normal methods of purification don't work on it. Only the Purify Chamber at max power can truly purify Shadow Lugia.
  • Permanently Missable Content: Averted. If you fail to snag a Shadow Pokémon in a one-time battle, there'll be a trainer somewhere who will still have it. In Colosseum the trainer can be found somewhere else, while in XD Miror B. will roam Orre and battle you until you snag all the Shadow Pokémon.
  • Power at a Price: Shadow attacks hit everything but other Shadow Pokémon super effectively, but Shadow Pokémon cannot level up, evolve, or learn new moves.
  • The Power of Friendship: Before a Shadow Pokémon can be purified into a normal Pokémon, it must let its heart open towards the trainer.
  • Purple Is the New Black: The aura of darkness that surrounds a Shadow Pokémon is dark purple.
  • Ramming Always Works: Shadow Blitz, Shadow Break, Shadow End, and Shadow Rush.
  • Red and Black and Evil All Over: A Shadow Pokémon's aura goes red and black when it enters Hyper/Reverse Mode.
  • Redemption Demotion: In the hands of an NPC trainer in Colosseum, Shadow Pokémon have a normal moveset with Shadow Rush included. When snagged, however, they only know Shadow Rush.
  • Riddle for the Ages: The exact process of creating Shadow Pokémon is never disclosed.
  • Secret Art: Enforced. Shadow attacks can only be used by Shadow Pokémon, and purified ones will immediately forget them.
  • Theme Naming: Every one of the type's attacks has "Shadow" in its name.
  • They Look Just Like Everyone Else!: They are visually indistinct from normal Pokémon to the average human. The only way to identify them is by having an innate ability to sense them like Rui or using special equipment like Michael's Aura Reader.
  • You Will Not Evade Me: Shadow Hold prevents switching.

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