Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Woolseyism / Literature

Go To


Added DiffLines:

** Luna Lovegood's nickname "Loony" was in Polish version translated to "Pomyluna" ("pomylona" means "crazy").

Added DiffLines:

** [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrical_psalter Metrical psalters]], translations of the Literature/BookOfPsalms that arose out of the Reformation. They attempt to render the Psalms into English rhyming poetry for easier use as hymns in churches. Compare the KJV's "''The earth is the LORD's, and the fulness thereof; the world and they that dwell therein. For he hath founded it upon the seas, and established it upon the floods.''" (Psalm 24:1-2), to Robert Crowley's 1549 translation:
-->''The earth and al that it holdeth, do to the lorde belonge:\\
The world and al that dwel therein as wel the olde as yonge.\\
For it is he that aboue al the seas hath it founded:\\
And that aboue the freshe waters hathe the same prepared.''


* The J. T. Bealby translation of Creator/ETAHoffmann's "Literature/TheSandman" repeatedly calls the creepy door-to-door salesman Coppola a "hawker" of oculars and glasses (which he refers to as "eyes"). This resounds beautifully with the gruesome tale of Nathanael's old nurse, who described the Sandman as a bird-like creature who hunts for eyes—a hawk is a bird of prey, and "to hawk" also means "to hunt in the style of a hawk". But it is entirely a clever translation; in the original, Coppola is just a "Wetterglashändler", which does not strike any such associations.

to:

* The J. T. Bealby translation of Creator/ETAHoffmann's "Literature/TheSandman" "Literature/TheSandman1816" repeatedly calls the creepy door-to-door salesman Coppola a "hawker" of oculars and glasses (which he refers to as "eyes"). This resounds beautifully with the gruesome tale of Nathanael's old nurse, who described the Sandman as a bird-like creature who hunts for eyes—a hawk is a bird of prey, and "to hawk" also means "to hunt in the style of a hawk". But it is entirely a clever translation; in the original, Coppola is just a "Wetterglashändler", which does not strike any such associations.


* The eponymous whale in ''Literature/MobyDick'' has several possible translations used in [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese languages]], including phonic translations "莫比敵" (Mò bǐ dí) in Mandarin, and "無比敵" (mou4 bei2 dik6) in Cantonese, which both roughly means "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast an enemy without rival/compare]]", befitting the whale's fearsome reputation.

to:

* The eponymous whale in ''Literature/MobyDick'' has several possible translations used in [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese languages]], including phonic translations "莫比敵" (Mò bǐ dí) (''Mòbǐdí'') in Mandarin, and "無比敵" (mou4 bei2 dik6) (''Mòuhbéidihk'') in Cantonese, which both roughly means "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast an enemy without rival/compare]]", befitting the whale's fearsome reputation.


** Ron's "[[UranusIsShowing can I have a look at Uranus too, Lavender?]]" joke from ''Goblet of Fire'' was changed in many translations since a lot of languages lack the pun from Uranus's name. The French translation changes it to the moon - in French it has the same connotations as "mooning" in English. The Danish translation changes it to Lavender talking about her ending got an unknown aspect, to which Ron replies "can I see an aspect of your end too?" The Polish translation was even better where Professor Trelawney describes Uranus as "an important celestial body". Ron asks if he can have a look at Lavender's body too. The first Italian translation just ignored the joke and translated the line literally, while the 2013 rerelease went with the "celestial body" joke as the Polish version.

to:

** Ron's "[[UranusIsShowing can I have a look at Uranus too, Lavender?]]" joke from ''Goblet of Fire'' was changed in many translations since a lot of languages lack the pun from Uranus's name. name.
***
The French translation changes it to the moon - in French it has the same connotations as "mooning" in English. English.
***
The Danish translation changes it to Lavender talking about her ending got an unknown aspect, to which Ron replies "can I see an aspect of your end too?" too?"
***
The Polish translation was even better where Professor Trelawney describes Uranus as "an important celestial body". Ron asks if he can have a look at Lavender's body too. too.
***
The first Italian translation just ignored the joke and translated the line literally, while the 2013 rerelease went with the "celestial body" joke as the Polish version.

Added DiffLines:

* Creator/DorothyLSayers's translation of ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' (Sayers translated all of Inferno and Purgatorio. She translated parts of Paradiso, but died before completing it. Barbara Reynolds, a medievalist scholar and Sayers's goddaughter, completed the rest of the Paradiso.) is another example. For one thing, her translation adheres to the terza rima. The names of the demons in the Inferno are also translated, with "Draghinazzo" becoming "Dragonel", "Libicocco" becoming "Libbicock", "Cagnazzo" becoming "Harrowhound", and "Calcabrina" becoming "Hacklespur", to name some examples (while sounding like coworkers of Screwtape). Another instance is in the Purgatorio, when Dante briefly encounters the Occitan troubadour Arnaut Daniel, who speaks to him in his native Provençal. Sayers translates Arnaut's lines into the Border Scots dialect to try to preserve the contrast and shift of languages, saying that Border Scots has a similar relation to English as Provençal does to Italian.


** The Hebrew translation has the pun turned a little more vulgar. There's a sign at the dam that describes it as having "בטון מזוין" (''beton mezoyan''), a technical term meaning "reinforced concrete". However in Hebrew the word "מזוין" (''mezoyan'') has the [[DoubleEntendre double meaning]] as a slang term for "[[PrecisionFStrike fucked]]" (or "screwed"). So in the Hebrew version, a bunch of preteens and teenagers are joking about the "fucking concrete".

to:

** The Hebrew translation has the pun turned a little more vulgar. There's a sign at the dam that describes it as having "בטון מזוין" (''beton mezoyan''), a technical term meaning "reinforced concrete". However in Hebrew the word "מזוין" (''mezoyan'') has the [[DoubleEntendre double meaning]] as a slang term for "[[PrecisionFStrike fucked]]" [[PrecisionFStrike "fucked"]] (or "screwed"). So in the Hebrew version, a bunch of preteens and teenagers are joking about the "fucking concrete".

Added DiffLines:

** On the other hand, the traditional Chinese (Taiwan) translation is ''less'' vulgar with this. It takes advantage of Mandarin Chinese being a tonal language and changes the tones to the words for dam (大壩, ''dà bà'', literally "great dam") to turn the 'dam snack bar' into the 'target practice snack bar' (打靶, ''dǎ bǎ'', literally "hit shooting-target"). This is most likely playing on how Zoë Nightshade, the one who first called for the questers to visit the "dam snack bar", was a Hunter of Artemis.


** The Hebrew translation has the pun turned a little more vulgar. There's a sign at the dam that describes it as having "בטון מזוין" (''beton mezoyan''), a technical term meaning "reinforced concrete". However in Hebrew the word "מזוין" (''mezoyan'') has the [[DoubleEntendre double meaning]] as a slang term for "''[[PrecisionFStrike fucked]]"''. So in the Hebrew version, a bunch of preteens and teenagers are joking about the "fucking concrete".

to:

** The Hebrew translation has the pun turned a little more vulgar. There's a sign at the dam that describes it as having "בטון מזוין" (''beton mezoyan''), a technical term meaning "reinforced concrete". However in Hebrew the word "מזוין" (''mezoyan'') has the [[DoubleEntendre double meaning]] as a slang term for "''[[PrecisionFStrike fucked]]"''."[[PrecisionFStrike fucked]]" (or "screwed"). So in the Hebrew version, a bunch of preteens and teenagers are joking about the "fucking concrete".

Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'': Some translators had a fun time with the "dam snack bar" joke (where our heroes kept joking around at the Hoover Dam).
** In the French translation, the joke isn't about the word "dam(n)" but instead about the name of the dam, Hoover. Our protagonists kept joking about if the snack bar is ''ouvert'' (open), which sounds like "Hoover".
** The Hebrew translation has the pun turned a little more vulgar. There's a sign at the dam that describes it as having "בטון מזוין" (''beton mezoyan''), a technical term meaning "reinforced concrete". However in Hebrew the word "מזוין" (''mezoyan'') has the [[DoubleEntendre double meaning]] as a slang term for "''[[PrecisionFStrike fucked]]"''. So in the Hebrew version, a bunch of preteens and teenagers are joking about the "fucking concrete".

Added DiffLines:

** In the absence of a more elegant Hebrew term for "pearwood", Rincewind's luggage is stated in the Hebrew translation to be made not of "Sapient Pearwood" but out of ''Etz Hada'at'', the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil from the biblical Garden of Eden. Many Hebrew fans actually think this makes it that much cooler and the fact that the Agateans make furniture out of it that much funnier in its absurdity.


** Mr. Tortoise from his ''Literature/GodelEscherBachAnEternalGoldenBraid'' becomes female when translated into languages having grammatical genders, as described in the introduction to the 20th anniversery edition. He becomes Madame Tortue, for example, in French. Hofstadter, dismayed at the realization of having failed to include any significant female characters in his dialogues, but unwilling to change the original English version, considers this an improvement.

to:

** Mr. Tortoise from his ''Literature/GodelEscherBachAnEternalGoldenBraid'' becomes female when translated into languages having grammatical genders, such as French or Italian where the word for tortoise or turtle is a feminine noun, as described in the introduction to the 20th anniversery edition. He becomes Madame Tortue, for example, in French. Hofstadter, dismayed at the realization of having failed to include any significant female characters in his dialogues, but unwilling to change the original English version, considers this an improvement.

Added DiffLines:

*** When Death is introduced in the French translation, to explain why he is referred to with male pronouns even though "la mort" is a feminine noun, there is a footnote: "la Mort est un mâle, un mâle nécessaire" (a pun on "mal nécessaire", meaning "necessary evil")


** Sirius Marauder nickname "Padfoot" doesn't have an equivalent word in Spanish, so the translation calls him "Canuto" (a relatively common name for dogs, since it derives from the word "Can").

to:

** Sirius Sirius' Marauder nickname "Padfoot" doesn't have an equivalent word in Spanish, so the translation calls him "Canuto" (a relatively common name for dogs, since it derives from the word "Can").

Added DiffLines:

** Sirius Marauder nickname "Padfoot" doesn't have an equivalent word in Spanish, so the translation calls him "Canuto" (a relatively common name for dogs, since it derives from the word "Can").

Showing 15 edit(s) of 191

Top