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London has several major railway stations, referenced in media (there's even a case from the ''WesternAnimation/ThomasTheTankEngine'' where engines argue about which station is London, not realising they are all correct). In all, at least ''twelve'' stations in Central London open today can be counted as being "major" termini - rather more than the number in other large cities (for comparison, Paris has six, Berlin four, and New York two[[note]]Although the low number for New York can be attributed in part to the general decline of rail travel in the United States and in part to the American mania for "union stations" - that is, single stations to host multiple railroads (New York Penn presently plays host to three, even with the decline) - the fact that the rail-crazy Europeans also have fewer stations just goes to show how strange London is.[[/note]]). This is in large part because of the aforementioned bit with the large number of railway companies in Britain; each liked to operate its own smaller station rather than gather together in a few larger ones. So we now have twelve big stations. In clockwise order from the West direction, these are the current ones:

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London has several major railway stations, referenced in media (there's even a case from the ''WesternAnimation/ThomasTheTankEngine'' ''Literature/TheRailwaySeries'' where engines argue about which station is London, not realising they are all correct). In all, at least ''twelve'' stations in Central London open today can be counted as being "major" termini - rather more than the number in other large cities (for comparison, Paris has six, Berlin four, and New York two[[note]]Although the low number for New York can be attributed in part to the general decline of rail travel in the United States and in part to the American mania for "union stations" - that is, single stations to host multiple railroads (New York Penn presently plays host to three, even with the decline) - the fact that the rail-crazy Europeans also have fewer stations just goes to show how strange London is.[[/note]]). This is in large part because of the aforementioned bit with the large number of railway companies in Britain; each liked to operate its own smaller station rather than gather together in a few larger ones. So we now have twelve big stations. In clockwise order from the West direction, these are the current ones:


* On the UsefulNotes/IsleOfWight, there's a quirky set of trains that aren't seen anywhere else on the Network, and are ''the'' oldest class of trains still in use on the mainline to date. These are the '''Class 483'''s, a class of [=EMUs=] that were constructed by renovating old 1938 London Underground stock from 1989 to 1992. The main reason why these trains still rumble reliably down the line from Ryde to Shanklin is that they can fit through a tunnel in Ryde that has a raised track bed to avoid being flooded. They are due for retirement in the 2020s.

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* On the UsefulNotes/IsleOfWight, there's a quirky set of trains that aren't seen anywhere else on the Network, and are ''the'' oldest class of trains still in use on the mainline to date. These are the '''Class 483'''s, a class of [=EMUs=] that were constructed by renovating old 1938 London Underground stock from 1989 to 1992. The main reason why these trains still rumble reliably down the line from Ryde to Shanklin is that they can fit through a tunnel in Ryde that has a raised track bed to avoid being flooded. They are due for retirement in the 2020s.2020s, to be replaced by the Class 484s, which - like the 483s, will be rebuilt from retired Tube stock.


British Rail operated for most of its life in a regional basis centred on London in a manner analogous to the Big Four with Scotland as a separate region; the old LNER routes became Eastern Region, for example. In 1982, this was 'sectorised' into three groups, called (at the time of privatisation), Intercity, Network [=SouthEast=] and Regional Railways. In addition, there were six Passenger Transport Executives that ran local services in the bigger urban areas like Manchester.

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British Rail operated for most of its life in a regional basis centred on London in a manner analogous to the Big Four with Scotland as a separate region; the old LNER routes became Eastern Region, for example. In 1982, this was 'sectorised' into three groups, called (at the time of privatisation), Intercity, [=InterCity=], Network [=SouthEast=] and Regional Railways. In addition, there were six Passenger Transport Executives that ran local services in the bigger urban areas like Manchester.



* Class 43 (HST) power car - the world's fastest diesel locomotive, the 'Intercity 125' (always operated as two power cars with a number, varying between franchise, of Mark 3 coaches between them) is nearing the end of its life despite new engines, but is still very common, especially on the Great Western line.

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* Class 43 (HST) power car - the world's fastest diesel locomotive, the 'Intercity '[=InterCity=] 125' (always operated as two power cars with a number, varying between franchise, of Mark 3 coaches between them) is nearing the end of its life despite new engines, but is still very common, especially on the Great Western line.



* On the UsefulNotes/IsleOfWight, there's a quirky set of trains that aren't seen anywhere else on the Network, and are ''the'' oldest class of trains still in use on the mainline to date. These are the '''Class 483'''s, a class of EMUs that were constructed by renovating old 1938 London Underground stock from 1989 to 1992. The main reason why these trains still rumble reliably down the line from Ryde to Shanklin is that they can fit through a tunnel in Ryde that has a raised track bed to avoid being flooded.

to:

* On the UsefulNotes/IsleOfWight, there's a quirky set of trains that aren't seen anywhere else on the Network, and are ''the'' oldest class of trains still in use on the mainline to date. These are the '''Class 483'''s, a class of EMUs [=EMUs=] that were constructed by renovating old 1938 London Underground stock from 1989 to 1992. The main reason why these trains still rumble reliably down the line from Ryde to Shanklin is that they can fit through a tunnel in Ryde that has a raised track bed to avoid being flooded. They are due for retirement in the 2020s.


* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world, but takes a long while to get around. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Railway, as well as the [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed services]] to Kent operated by Southeastern. All Thameslink services at this station call at the lower level station, designated Platforms A and B to avoid confusion.

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* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love (having spent the 60s through the 80s underused and under threat of demolition) and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world, but takes a long while to get around. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Railway, as well as the [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed services]] to Kent operated by Southeastern. All Thameslink services at this station call at the lower level station, designated Platforms A and B to avoid confusion.



* London King's Cross. Home of the East Coast Main Line (current operators London North Eastern Railway and two open access operators, Hull Trains and Grand Central). UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground station, King's Cross St. Pancras, is a six line station and the busiest on the network. It's been claimed, probably inaccurately, Boudica is buried there. Underwent a major renovation in the late 2000s/early 2010s.
** No discussion of this station is complete without discussing the use and misuse of this station by ''Franchise/HarryPotter'', where it is the departure point for the Hogwarts Express via Platform 9¾. Platforms 9 and 10 in real life not only have no wall between them, they are not even in the ECML part of the station. 4 and 5 were used in filming.

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* London King's Cross. Home of the East Coast Main Line (current operators London North Eastern Railway and two open access operators, Hull Trains and Grand Central). UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground station, King's Cross St. Pancras, is a six line station and the busiest on the network. It's been claimed, probably inaccurately, Boudica is buried there. Underwent a major renovation in the late 2000s/early 2010s.
2010s, which saw the removal of a much-maligned 1972 extention that obscured the station's facade.
** No discussion of this station is complete without discussing the use and misuse of this station by ''Franchise/HarryPotter'', where it is the departure point for the Hogwarts Express via Platform 9¾. Platforms 9 and 10 in real life not only have no wall between them, they are not even in the ECML part of the station. 4 and 5 were used in filming.filming, with the more photogenic St. Pancras used for exteriors.



* London Waterloo. Named after the 1815 battle (before any more French people complain, they should note Gare d'Austerlitz in Paris), it contained Waterloo International, home of Eurostar until 2007. It also had (until UsefulNotes/WorldWarII) the London Necropolis station next door, a station dedicated to running funeral trains for the London Necropolis company, who ran trains to the Brookwood Cemetery, where over 240,000 people are buried and designed to deal with London's deceased. Waterloo East is a smaller station, between London Bridge and Charing Cross as noted above. It is connected to the main station by a footbridge, while the eastern end of the station connects with Southwark Underground Station.

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* London Waterloo. Named after the 1815 battle (before any more French people complain, they should note Gare d'Austerlitz in Paris), it contained Waterloo International, home of Eurostar until 2007. It also had (until UsefulNotes/WorldWarII) the London Necropolis station next door, a station dedicated to running funeral trains for the London Necropolis company, who ran trains to the Brookwood Cemetery, where over 240,000 people are buried and designed to deal with London's deceased. Waterloo East is a smaller station, between London Bridge and Charing Cross as noted above. It is connected to the main station by a footbridge, while the eastern end of the station connects with Southwark Underground Station. In the days of transatlantic ocean liners, your boat train to Southampton would most likely depart from Waterloo.



* London Charing Cross. One of the smaller termini with only six platforms, home to Southeastern services to the south-east of England. The closest station to Trafalgar Square and the West End, it sits on the north bank of the Thames, and can be seen from Waterloo. Southeastern are known for their tendency to shut down their entire network if even a single millimeter of snow is detected, something which naturally pisses off the thousands of commuters who rely on it every day.
* London Victoria: Until the advent of Eurostar and direct connections through the Channel Tunnel, Victoria was where you started your journey to the continent. Regular trains ran to Dover and Folkestone to connect with the channel ferries, not to mention more luxurious trains such as the Golden Arrow and the London extension of the Orient Express network. It still has some international connections, as many tourists use it to go to and from Gatwick Airport because nobody's told them it's cheaper to go from Blackfriars.

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* London Charing Cross. One of the smaller termini with only six platforms, home to Southeastern services to the south-east of England. The closest station to Trafalgar Square and the West End, it sits on the north bank of the Thames, and can be seen from Waterloo. Southeastern are known for their tendency to shut down their entire network if even a single millimeter of snow is detected, something which naturally pisses off the thousands of commuters who rely on it every day.
day. Like St. Pancras above, much of the Charing Cross frontage contains a hotel.
* London Victoria: Until the advent of Eurostar and direct connections through the Channel Tunnel, Victoria was where you started your journey to the continent. [[note]]Charing Cross also filled this purpose prior to the First World War.[[/note]] Regular trains ran to Dover and Folkestone to connect with the channel ferries, not to mention more luxurious trains such as the Golden Arrow and the London extension of the Orient Express network. It still has some international connections, as many tourists use it to go to and from Gatwick Airport because nobody's told them it's cheaper to go from Blackfriars.


* London Paddington: Departure point for the Great Western line, which is non-electrified bar a section that serves the Heathrow services from there, it's a visually impressive station. The Great Western line is currently operated by Great Western Railway. Originally dubbed "Worst Great Western" and "Worst Late Western" by many, it suffered a fare strike in 2007-08, once had the worst punctuality record in the country (until Thameslink and Great Northern came along) and once had the government considering pulling the franchise. [[TheEngineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel]] would not approve.

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* London Paddington: Departure point for the Great Western line, which is non-electrified bar a section that serves the Heathrow services from there, it's a visually impressive station. The Great Western line is currently operated by Great Western Railway.Railway, and suburban services to Reading operated by TfL Rail. Originally dubbed "Worst Great Western" and "Worst Late Western" by many, it suffered a fare strike in 2007-08, once had the worst punctuality record in the country (until Thameslink and Great Northern came along) and once had the government considering pulling the franchise. [[TheEngineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel]] would not approve.



* London Euston - Home of the West Coast Main Line, which goes to Scotland via Manchester, London Northwestern Railway services to Birmingham and London Overground trains to Watford Junction. The WCML is currently owned by a certain Richard Branson as part of the Virgin network. The current station is an unpopular 1960s concrete affair that is a controversial replacement for the original that was knocked down along with the famous arch.
* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world, but takes a long while to get around. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Railway, as well as the [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed services]] to Kent operated by Southeastern. Thameslink services between Bedford and Brighton call at the lower level station, designated Platforms A and B to avoid confusion.

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* London Euston - Home of the West Coast Main Line, which goes to Scotland via Manchester, London Northwestern Railway services to Birmingham and London Overground trains to Watford Junction. The WCML is currently WCML, formerly owned by a certain Richard Branson as part of the Virgin network.network, is, as of 2019, now owned by a [=FirstGroup=]-Trenitalia joint venture named "[[GratuitousItalian Avanti]] West Coast". The current station is an unpopular 1960s concrete affair that is a controversial replacement for the original that was knocked down along with the famous arch.
* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world, but takes a long while to get around. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Railway, as well as the [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed services]] to Kent operated by Southeastern. All Thameslink services between Bedford and Brighton at this station call at the lower level station, designated Platforms A and B to avoid confusion.



* London Liverpool Street. Used to be grimy and confusing to get around due to its split-level concourse, but was completely refurbished in the early 1980s and is now bright, airy and spacious... except for platforms 11-18. Home of the Abellio Greater Anglia services to the Anglia region, the network was formerly known as "one" (sic), which led to jokes, like "The eleven twenty-one one service". Or confusion, as in "[[WhosOnFirst The 1120 "one" service...]]". It is now also served by London Overground and [=TfL Rail=] suburban services; the latter being the beta version of the Elizabeth Line aka Crossrail running to Shenfield.

to:

* London Liverpool Street. Used to be grimy and confusing to get around due to its split-level concourse, but was completely refurbished in the early 1980s and is now bright, airy and spacious... except for platforms 11-18. Home of the Abellio Greater Anglia services to the Anglia region, the network was formerly known as "one" (sic), ('''o'''perated by '''N'''ational '''E'''xpress), which led to jokes, like "The eleven twenty-one one service". Or confusion, as in "[[WhosOnFirst The 1120 "one" service...]]". It is now also served by London Overground and [=TfL Rail=] suburban services; the latter being the beta version of the Elizabeth Line aka Crossrail running to Shenfield.



* London Bridge (always called that, since it's the actual name of the nearby bridge). The main part of the station is a terminus, but some lines run past it and on to Waterloo East and Charing Cross, or to Cannon Street, or to Blackfriars, St. Pancras and beyond on the Thameslink line. Trivia: the station is right next to London's tallest building (as of 2014), the Shard. Currently undergoing a major refurbishment with a huge new concourse having just opened, allowing Thameslink services to proceed to Blackfriars.

to:

* London Bridge (always called that, since it's the actual name of the nearby bridge). The main part of the station is a terminus, but some lines run past it and on to Waterloo East and Charing Cross, or to Cannon Street, or to Blackfriars, St. Pancras and beyond on the Thameslink line. Trivia: the station is right next to London's tallest building (as of 2014), the Shard. Currently undergoing From 2014 to 2017, Blackfriars underwent a major refurbishment with a huge new concourse having just then opened, allowing Thameslink services to proceed to Blackfriars.the station.


* The Intercity Express Programme led to the advent of the Class 800 Bi-modal Multiple Unit [[note]]meaning it can convert from diesel to electric power and back[[/note]] and the Class 801 Electric Multiple Unit. Both the 800 and the 801 are high-speed trains brought in to gradually replace the Intercity 125 and 225 trains. The Class 802, and the soon-to-be-built Classes 803 and 804 were also developed from them, and look rather similar. Currently they operate by a range of corporate names like 'Azuma'[[note]]LNER[[/note]], 'Intercity Express Train' (or IET)[[note]]Great Western Railway[[/note]], 'Nova 1'[[note]]Transpennine Express[[/note]], and 'Paragon'[[note]]Hull Trains[[/note]].

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* The Intercity Express Programme led to the advent of the Class 800 Bi-modal Multiple Unit [[note]]meaning it can convert from diesel to electric power and back[[/note]] and the Class 801 Electric Multiple Unit. Both the 800 and the 801 are high-speed trains brought in to gradually replace the Intercity 125 and 225 trains. The Class 802, and the soon-to-be-built Classes 803 and 804 were also developed from them, and look rather similar. Currently they operate by a range of corporate names like 'Azuma'[[note]]LNER[[/note]], 'Intercity Express Train' (or IET)[[note]]Great Western Railway[[/note]], 'Nova 1'[[note]]Transpennine Express[[/note]], and 'Paragon'[[note]]Hull Trains[[/note]].
Trains[[/note]]. Hitachi, which made all variants of the Intercity Express Programme, also manufactures Shinkansen bullet trains in Japan, and it shows.


* The Intercity Express Programme led to the advent of the Class 800 Bi-modal Multiple Unit [[note]]meaning it can convert from diesel to electric power and back[[/note]] and the Class 801 Electric Multiple Unit. Both the 800 and the 801 are high-speed trains brought in to gradually replace the Intercity 125 and 225 trains. The Class 802, and the soon-to-be-built Classes 803 and 804 were also developed from them, and look rather similar. Currently they operate by a range of corporate names like 'Azuma'[[note]]LNER[[/note], 'Intercity Express Train' (or IET)[[note]]Great Western Railway[[/note]], 'Nova 1'[[note]]Transpennine Express[[/note]], and 'Paragon'[[note]]Hull Trains[[/note]].

to:

* The Intercity Express Programme led to the advent of the Class 800 Bi-modal Multiple Unit [[note]]meaning it can convert from diesel to electric power and back[[/note]] and the Class 801 Electric Multiple Unit. Both the 800 and the 801 are high-speed trains brought in to gradually replace the Intercity 125 and 225 trains. The Class 802, and the soon-to-be-built Classes 803 and 804 were also developed from them, and look rather similar. Currently they operate by a range of corporate names like 'Azuma'[[note]]LNER[[/note], 'Azuma'[[note]]LNER[[/note]], 'Intercity Express Train' (or IET)[[note]]Great Western Railway[[/note]], 'Nova 1'[[note]]Transpennine Express[[/note]], and 'Paragon'[[note]]Hull Trains[[/note]].


* The Intercity Express Programme led to the advent of the Class 800 Bi-modal Multiple Unit [[note]]meaning it can convert from diesel to electric power and back[[/note]]] and the Class 801 Electric Multiple Unit. Both the 800 and the 801 are high-speed trains brought in to gradually replace the Intercity 125 and 225 trains. The Class 802, and the soon-to-be-built Classes 803 and 804 were also developed from them, and look rather similar. Currently they operate by a range of corporate names like 'Azuma'[[note]]LNER[[/note], 'Intercity Express Train' (or IET)[[note]]Great Western Railway[[/note]], 'Nova 1'[[note]]Transpennine Express[[/note]], and 'Paragon'[[note]]Hull Trains[[/note]].

to:

* The Intercity Express Programme led to the advent of the Class 800 Bi-modal Multiple Unit [[note]]meaning it can convert from diesel to electric power and back[[/note]]] back[[/note]] and the Class 801 Electric Multiple Unit. Both the 800 and the 801 are high-speed trains brought in to gradually replace the Intercity 125 and 225 trains. The Class 802, and the soon-to-be-built Classes 803 and 804 were also developed from them, and look rather similar. Currently they operate by a range of corporate names like 'Azuma'[[note]]LNER[[/note], 'Intercity Express Train' (or IET)[[note]]Great Western Railway[[/note]], 'Nova 1'[[note]]Transpennine Express[[/note]], and 'Paragon'[[note]]Hull Trains[[/note]].



to:

* The Intercity Express Programme led to the advent of the Class 800 Bi-modal Multiple Unit [[note]]meaning it can convert from diesel to electric power and back[[/note]]] and the Class 801 Electric Multiple Unit. Both the 800 and the 801 are high-speed trains brought in to gradually replace the Intercity 125 and 225 trains. The Class 802, and the soon-to-be-built Classes 803 and 804 were also developed from them, and look rather similar. Currently they operate by a range of corporate names like 'Azuma'[[note]]LNER[[/note], 'Intercity Express Train' (or IET)[[note]]Great Western Railway[[/note]], 'Nova 1'[[note]]Transpennine Express[[/note]], and 'Paragon'[[note]]Hull Trains[[/note]].


It is now a collection of 24 passenger train operating companies (plus freight companies), which change ownership and name fairly frequently, as networks are merged, split or franchises get revoked early - as in the case of the infamous Connex. These companies frequently incorporate the name of their owner into their name (Arriva Trains Wales or Abellio Greater Anglia) or reference a historical Big Four company (Southern).

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It is now a collection of 24 passenger train operating companies (plus freight companies), which change ownership and name fairly frequently, as networks are merged, split or franchises get revoked early - as in the case of the infamous Connex. These companies frequently incorporate the name of their owner into their name (Arriva Trains Wales (Govia Thameslink Railway or Abellio Greater Anglia) or reference a historical Big Four company (Southern).
(Great Western Railway).



* London Paddington: Departure point for the Great Western line, which is non-electrified bar a section that serves the Heathrow services from there, it's a visually impressive station. The Great Western line is currently operated by First Great Western. Dubbed "Worst Great Western" and "Worst Late Western" by many, it suffered a fare strike in 2007-08, has the worst punctuality record in the country and has had the government considering pulling the franchise. [[TheEngineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel]] would not approve.

to:

* London Paddington: Departure point for the Great Western line, which is non-electrified bar a section that serves the Heathrow services from there, it's a visually impressive station. The Great Western line is currently operated by First Great Western. Dubbed Western Railway. Originally dubbed "Worst Great Western" and "Worst Late Western" by many, it suffered a fare strike in 2007-08, has once had the worst punctuality record in the country (until Thameslink and has Great Northern came along) and once had the government considering pulling the franchise. [[TheEngineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel]] would not approve.



* London Euston - Home of the West Coast Main Line, which goes to Scotland via Manchester, London Midland services to Birmingham and London Overground trains to Watford Junction. The WCML is currently owned by a certain Richard Branson as part of the Virgin network. The current station is an unpopular 1960s concrete affair that is a controversial replacement for the original that was knocked down along with the famous arch.
* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world, but takes a long while to get around. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Trains, as well as the [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed services]] to Kent operated by Southeastern. Thameslink services between Bedford and Brighton call at the lower level station, designated Platforms A and B to avoid confusion.

to:

* London Euston - Home of the West Coast Main Line, which goes to Scotland via Manchester, London Midland Northwestern Railway services to Birmingham and London Overground trains to Watford Junction. The WCML is currently owned by a certain Richard Branson as part of the Virgin network. The current station is an unpopular 1960s concrete affair that is a controversial replacement for the original that was knocked down along with the famous arch.
* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world, but takes a long while to get around. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Trains, Railway, as well as the [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed services]] to Kent operated by Southeastern. Thameslink services between Bedford and Brighton call at the lower level station, designated Platforms A and B to avoid confusion.



* London King's Cross. Home of the East Coast Main Line (current operators Virgin Trains East Coast and two open access operators, First Hull Train and Grand Central). UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground station, King's Cross St. Pancras, is a six line station and the busiest on the network. It's been claimed, probably inaccurately, Boudica is buried there. Underwent a major renovation in the late 2000s/early 2010s.

to:

* London King's Cross. Home of the East Coast Main Line (current operators Virgin Trains East Coast London North Eastern Railway and two open access operators, First Hull Train Trains and Grand Central). UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground station, King's Cross St. Pancras, is a six line station and the busiest on the network. It's been claimed, probably inaccurately, Boudica is buried there. Underwent a major renovation in the late 2000s/early 2010s.



* London Liverpool Street. Used to be grimy and confusing to get around due to its split-level concourse, but was completely refurbished in the early 1980s and is now bright, airy and spacious... except for platforms 11-18. Home of the Abellio Greater Anglia services to the Anglia region, the network was formerly known as "one" (sic), which led to jokes, like "The eleven twenty-one one service". Or confusion, as in "[[WhosOnFirst The 1120 "one" service...]]". It is now also served by London Overground and [=TfL Rail=] suburban services; the latter being the beta version of the Elizabeth Line aka Crossrail 1 running to Shenfield.

to:

* London Liverpool Street. Used to be grimy and confusing to get around due to its split-level concourse, but was completely refurbished in the early 1980s and is now bright, airy and spacious... except for platforms 11-18. Home of the Abellio Greater Anglia services to the Anglia region, the network was formerly known as "one" (sic), which led to jokes, like "The eleven twenty-one one service". Or confusion, as in "[[WhosOnFirst The 1120 "one" service...]]". It is now also served by London Overground and [=TfL Rail=] suburban services; the latter being the beta version of the Elizabeth Line aka Crossrail 1 running to Shenfield.



* London Bridge (always called that, since it's the actual name of the nearby bridge). The main part of the station is a terminus, but some lines run past it and on to Waterloo East and Charing Cross, or to Cannon Street, or to Blackfriars, St. Pancras and beyond on the Thameslink line. Trivia: the station is right next to London's tallest building (as of 2014), the Shard. Currently undergoing a major refurbishment with a huge new concourse having just opened.

to:

* London Bridge (always called that, since it's the actual name of the nearby bridge). The main part of the station is a terminus, but some lines run past it and on to Waterloo East and Charing Cross, or to Cannon Street, or to Blackfriars, St. Pancras and beyond on the Thameslink line. Trivia: the station is right next to London's tallest building (as of 2014), the Shard. Currently undergoing a major refurbishment with a huge new concourse having just opened.opened, allowing Thameslink services to proceed to Blackfriars.



** Recent proposals have been made for all London-bound sleeper trains terminate at the now-disused International part of the station... instead it will be brought back into regular use for South West trains.

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** Recent proposals have been made for all London-bound sleeper trains terminate at the now-disused International part of the station... instead instead, it will be was brought back into regular use for South West trains.Western Railway trains in 2018.



* London Charing Cross. One of the smaller termini with only six platforms, home to Southeastern Trains services to the south-east of England. The closest station to Trafalgar Square and the West End, it sits on the north bank of the Thames, and can be seen from Waterloo. Southeastern Trains are known for their tendency to shut down their entire network if even a single millimeter of snow is detected, something which naturally pisses off the thousands of commuters who rely on it every day.

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* London Charing Cross. One of the smaller termini with only six platforms, home to Southeastern Trains services to the south-east of England. The closest station to Trafalgar Square and the West End, it sits on the north bank of the Thames, and can be seen from Waterloo. Southeastern Trains are known for their tendency to shut down their entire network if even a single millimeter of snow is detected, something which naturally pisses off the thousands of commuters who rely on it every day.



* The Desiro (Class 185 DMU, Classes 350/360/380, 444/450/700 [=EMUs=]) - built by Siemens, these replaced a lot of older units post-privatisation, mostly with South West Trains in Southern England and London Midland in the Midlands.

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* The Desiro (Class 185 DMU, Classes 350/360/380, 444/450/700 444/450/700/707/717 [=EMUs=]) - built by Siemens, these replaced a lot of older units post-privatisation, mostly with South West Trains in Southern England and London Midland in the Midlands.

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** Creator/JohnSchlesinger's first film, ''Film/{{Terminus}}'', depicts ADayInTheLife of this station.


Most of the trains in regular service the network now have automatic doors, while the rest have doors that are locked remotely pre-departure and can be opened only after arrival. Bizarrely, to leave a non-retrofitted Mk3 carriage[[note]]still the most common type on long-distance services[[/note]]you must open the window, lean out of it, and use the door handle on the outside - much to the confusion of uninformed tourists. Not counting the Eurostar trains, the fastest ones on the network are the InterCity 125, the current confirmed record holder as the fastest diesel-powered train at 148 mph (238 km/h), the Class 91 "Intercity 225" loco-hauled trains found on the East Coast Main Line, the Class 390 "Pendolino" units on the West Coast Main Line, and fastest of all (at 140mph top speed) Southeastern's Class 395 "[[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High-Speed]]" or "Javelin" trains, which partly use domestic sections of Eurostar track with overhead wiring, and partly third-rail commuter lines at slower speeds.

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Most of the trains in regular service the network now have automatic doors, while the rest have doors that are locked remotely pre-departure and can be opened only after arrival. Bizarrely, to leave a non-retrofitted Mk3 [=Mk3=] carriage[[note]]still the most common type on long-distance services[[/note]]you must open the window, lean out of it, and use the door handle on the outside - much to the confusion of uninformed tourists. Not counting the Eurostar trains, the fastest ones on the network are the InterCity 125, the current confirmed record holder as the fastest diesel-powered train at 148 mph (238 km/h), the Class 91 "Intercity 225" loco-hauled trains found on the East Coast Main Line, the Class 390 "Pendolino" units on the West Coast Main Line, and fastest of all (at 140mph top speed) Southeastern's Class 395 "[[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High-Speed]]" or "Javelin" trains, which partly use domestic sections of Eurostar track with overhead wiring, and partly third-rail commuter lines at slower speeds.


* Class 47: The most common diesel locomotive built for BR, the 47 remains in use. Some have been refurbished and re-engined with second-hand EMD engines to become the Class 57.
* Class 66: A version of an American (EMD) design, these are nicknamed 'Sheds', because, well, they look like one. Very distinctive shapes, due to the pointed roof corrugated sides and large windows. Also notable at their introduction for hardly ever breaking down. Carry a number of liveries, including Freightliner, EWS, GBRF, Railfreight Services and DB Schenker.

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* Class 47: The most common diesel locomotive built for BR, the 47 remains in use. Some have been refurbished and re-engined with second-hand EMD engines to become the Class 57.
57. (Sixteen of which were used by Virgin as "rescue engines" for failed Pendolinos, and were given ''Series/{{Thunderbirds}}''-themed names. One, ''Lady Penelope'', kept its name - and pink nameplate! - when they passed out of Virgin ownership again).
* Class 66: A version of an American (EMD) design, these are nicknamed 'Sheds', because, well, they look like one. Very distinctive shapes, due to the pointed roof corrugated sides and large windows. Also notable at their introduction for hardly ever breaking down. Carry a number of liveries, including Freightliner, EWS, GBRF, Railfreight Services and DB Schenker.Schenker (which, along with their virtual omnipresence, also makes them beloved of railway modellers).


The British railway system also has the distinction of hosting the world's most scenic railway journey, as voted by the travel magazine ''Wanderlust''. The West Highland line, which links Glasgow to the highland port towns of Oban and Mallaig, has held the title for three years, beating the Trans-Siberian Railway and the Cuzco-Macchu Picchu line in Peru. It passes over Rannoch Moor and the Glenfinnan viaduct, where HarryPotter was attacked by Dementors. In summer, part of the route from Fort William (sleeper trains run from London Euston) to Mallaig is covered by regular steam trains marketed as "The Jacobite" and which sell a large array of Potter merchandise.

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The British railway system also has the distinction of hosting the world's most scenic railway journey, as voted by the travel magazine ''Wanderlust''. The West Highland line, which links Glasgow to the highland port towns of Oban and Mallaig, has held the title for three years, beating the Trans-Siberian Railway and the Cuzco-Macchu Picchu line in Peru. It passes over Rannoch Moor and the Glenfinnan viaduct, where HarryPotter Franchise/HarryPotter was attacked by Dementors. In summer, part of the route from Fort William (sleeper trains run from London Euston) to Mallaig is covered by regular steam trains marketed as "The Jacobite" and which sell a large array of Potter merchandise.


* On the UsefulNotes/IsleOfWight, there's a quirky set of trains that aren't seen anywhere else on the Network, and are ''the'' oldest class of trains still in use on the mainline to date. These are the '''Class 483'''s, a class of EMUs that were constructed by renovating old 1938 London Underground stock in 1989. The main reason why these trains still rumble reliably down the line from Ryde to Shanklin is that they can fit through a tunnel in Ryde that has a raised track bed to avoid being flooded.

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* On the UsefulNotes/IsleOfWight, there's a quirky set of trains that aren't seen anywhere else on the Network, and are ''the'' oldest class of trains still in use on the mainline to date. These are the '''Class 483'''s, a class of EMUs that were constructed by renovating old 1938 London Underground stock in 1989.from 1989 to 1992. The main reason why these trains still rumble reliably down the line from Ryde to Shanklin is that they can fit through a tunnel in Ryde that has a raised track bed to avoid being flooded.

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