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Burzum was a one-man studio project by Norwegian black metal musician Varg Vikernes, notorious within music history for church burnings, the killing of Music/{{Mayhem}}'s guitarist Euronymous, and being a white nationalist. Burzum is also the {{Trope Maker|s}} for ambient black metal.

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Burzum was a one-man studio project by Norwegian black metal musician Varg Vikernes, notorious within music history for church burnings, the killing of burning churches, stabbing Music/{{Mayhem}}'s guitarist Euronymous, Euronymous to death, and being a white nationalist.supremacist. Burzum is also the {{Trope Maker|s}} for ambient black metal.


** There are two odd cases where a song does not appear on an album of the same title. Somewhat confusingly, ''Det som engang var'' does not feature the track "Det som en gang var" (note the slight spelling difference): that song didn't make an appearance until his next album, ''Hvis lyset tar oss''.
** There is also a song entitled "Burzum" that does not appear on his SelfTitledAlbum; it appears on ''Filosofem'', although it is more commonly known by its GratuitousGerman title, "Dunkelheit" (however, "Burzum" is the official title). Even though it was the first song he wrote for the project, Varg was dissatisfied with his original recording of it and did not release it. Recognising it to be one of his finest songs, he withheld its release until he recorded a version he found satisfactory.

to:

** There are two odd cases where a song does not appear on an album of the same (or very nearly same) title. Somewhat confusingly, ''Det som engang var'' does not feature the track "Det som en gang var" (note the slight spelling difference): that song didn't make an appearance until his next album, ''Hvis lyset tar oss''.
** There is also a
The song entitled "Burzum" that does not appear on his SelfTitledAlbum; it appears on ''Filosofem'', although it is more commonly known by its GratuitousGerman title, "Dunkelheit" (however, "Burzum" is the official title). Even though it was the first song he wrote for the project, Varg was dissatisfied with his original recording of it and did not release it. Recognising it to be one of his finest songs, he withheld its release until he recorded a version he found satisfactory.satisfactory.
** Also, somewhat confusingly, ''Det som engang var'' does not feature the track "Det som en gang var" (note the slight spelling difference): that song didn't make an appearance until his next album, ''Hvis lyset tar oss''. It's possible that the explanation is similar to the one for "Burzum".


* PrematureEncapsulation: The songs "Burzum" and "Det som en gang var" do not appear on the albums of, respectively, the same and similar titles. More information can be found under TitleTrack below.



* TitleTrack: Somewhat confusingly, ''Det som engang var'' does not feature the track "Det som en gang var" (note the slight spelling difference): that song didn't make an appearance until his next album, ''Hvis lyset tar oss''. Played straight on ''Hvis lyset tar oss'', ''Dauði Baldrs'', and ''The Ways of Yore'', and PlayedWith on ''Sôl austan, Mâni vestan'' (which has two songs featuring each half of the title). The others avert it completely. (Note that he also had a ''song'' originally named "Burzum", which does not appear on his SelfTitledAlbum; it was retitled "Dunkelheit" and appears on ''Filosofem'').

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* TitleTrack: TitleTrack:
** Played straight on ''Hvis lyset tar oss'', ''Dauði Baldrs'', and ''The Ways of Yore''.
** PlayedWith on ''Sôl austan, Mâni vestan'', which has two songs featuring each half of the title.
** There are two odd cases where a song does not appear on an album of the same title.
Somewhat confusingly, ''Det som engang var'' does not feature the track "Det som en gang var" (note the slight spelling difference): that song didn't make an appearance until his next album, ''Hvis lyset tar oss''. Played straight on ''Hvis lyset tar oss'', ''Dauði Baldrs'', and ''The Ways of Yore'', and PlayedWith on ''Sôl austan, Mâni vestan'' (which has two songs featuring each half of the title). The others avert it completely. (Note oss''.
** There is also a song entitled "Burzum"
that he also had a ''song'' originally named "Burzum", which does not appear on his SelfTitledAlbum; it was retitled appears on ''Filosofem'', although it is more commonly known by its GratuitousGerman title, "Dunkelheit" (however, "Burzum" is the official title). Even though it was the first song he wrote for the project, Varg was dissatisfied with his original recording of it and appears on ''Filosofem'').did not release it. Recognising it to be one of his finest songs, he withheld its release until he recorded a version he found satisfactory.
** The other releases avert this trope completely.


* IndecipherableLyrics: As a rule when the lyrics are screamed, although Norwegian speakers might face less difficulty. The few songs with English lyrics (mostly "Burzum", "Beholding the Daughters of the Firmament", and "Decrepitude I") are actually surprisingly easy to understand, at least by BlackMetal standards.

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* IndecipherableLyrics: As a rule when the lyrics are screamed, although Norwegian speakers might face less difficulty. The few However, some of the songs with English lyrics (mostly "Burzum", "Beholding the Daughters of the Firmament", and "Decrepitude I") are actually surprisingly easy to understand, at least by BlackMetal standards.standards; most listeners won't have much difficulty making out any of the words of "Burzum", and some of the other songs from the same period (e.g., "Beholding the Daughters of the Firmament") are also mostly comprehensible. Some of the earlier English-language songs might play the trope a bit straighter, though. It's possible that the slow tempo of the ''Filosofem'' lyrics helps make them more comprehensible.


* IndecipherableLyrics: As a rule when the lyrics are screamed (although a Norwegian speaker might face less difficulty).

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* IndecipherableLyrics: As a rule when the lyrics are screamed (although a screamed, although Norwegian speaker speakers might face less difficulty).difficulty. The few songs with English lyrics (mostly "Burzum", "Beholding the Daughters of the Firmament", and "Decrepitude I") are actually surprisingly easy to understand, at least by BlackMetal standards.


%%'''NOTE:''' Varg Vikernes is a pretty polarising fellow, so please keep a neutral perspective and remember the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement.

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%%'''NOTE:''' Varg Vikernes is a pretty polarising fellow, so please keep a neutral perspective and remember the RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement.
Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement.


Burzum is a one-man studio project by Norwegian black metal musician Varg Vikernes, notorious within music history for church burnings, the killing of Music/{{Mayhem}}'s guitarist Euronymous, and being a white nationalist. Burzum is also the {{Trope Maker|s}} for ambient black metal.

to:

Burzum is was a one-man studio project by Norwegian black metal musician Varg Vikernes, notorious within music history for church burnings, the killing of Music/{{Mayhem}}'s guitarist Euronymous, and being a white nationalist. Burzum is also the {{Trope Maker|s}} for ambient black metal.



Vikernes was released in 2009 on parole, and started recording the album ''Belus'', his first metal album since his arrest.

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Vikernes was released in 2009 on parole, and started recording the album ''Belus'', his first metal album since his arrest.
arrest. Burzum came to an end in 2018 as part of a decision by Vikernes himself who wished to not extend the project more than it already has.


''Dauði Baldrs'', ''Hliðskjálf'', ''Sôl austan, Mâni vestan'', and ''The Ways of Yore'' are ambient albums; the remainder are primarily metal (though they typically have at least one song).

to:

''Dauði Baldrs'', ''Hliðskjálf'', ''Sôl austan, Mâni vestan'', and ''The Ways of Yore'' are ambient albums; the remainder are primarily metal (though they typically have at least one ambient song).


* ''Burzum'', 1992
* ''Det som engang var'', 1993
* ''Aske'', 1993
* ''Hvis lyset tar oss'', 1994
* ''Filosofem'', 1996
* ''Dauði Baldrs'', 1997
* ''Hliðskjálf'', 1999
* ''Belus'', 2010

to:

* ''Burzum'', ''Burzum'' (BlackSpeech of Mordor for "Darkness"), 1992
* ''Aske'' (Norwegian for "Ashes"; EP), 1993
* ''Det som engang var'', 1993
* ''Aske'',
var'' (Norwegian for "What Once Was"), 1993
* ''Hvis lyset tar oss'', oss'' (Norwegian for "If the Light Takes Us"), 1994
* ''Filosofem'', ''Filosofem'' (Norwegian for "Philosopheme"), 1996
* ''Dauði Baldrs'', Baldrs'' (Old Norse for "Baldr's Death"), 1997
* ''Hliðskjálf'', ''Hliðskjálf'' (the name of Odin's throne in Myth/NorseMythology), 1999
* ''Belus'', ''Belus'' (Proto-Indo-European name of Baldr/Apollo/Belenus/Belobog, according to Vikernes), 2010



* ''Umskiptar'', 2012
* ''Sôl austan, Mâni vestan'', 2013

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* ''Umskiptar'', ''Umskiptar'' (Old Norse for "Metamorphosis"), 2012
* ''Sôl austan, Mâni vestan'', vestan'' (Old Norse for "East of the Sun, West of the Moon"), 2013


Added DiffLines:


''Dauði Baldrs'', ''Hliðskjálf'', ''Sôl austan, Mâni vestan'', and ''The Ways of Yore'' are ambient albums; the remainder are primarily metal (though they typically have at least one song).


* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Some of the official song titles don't match the most commonly used Norwegian spellings, likely because the font Varg used didn't have the å and ø characters. Examples include "En ring til aa herske" (would typically be spelt "En ring til å herske"), "Naar himmelen klarner" (typically spelt "Når himmelen klarner"), "Belus' doed" (typically spelt "Belus' død"), "Morgenroede" (typically spelt "Morgenrøde"), and so on. (Note that there are several different dialects of Norwegian, and spellings aren't always standardised between them. The most commonly ''written'' is Bokmål by far, with Nynorsk being a distant second; however, most speakers don't actually ''speak'' either Bokmål or Nynorsk as written, but rather a regional dialect that identifies their origins.)

to:

* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Some of the official song titles don't match the most commonly used Norwegian spellings, likely because the font Varg used didn't have the å and ø characters. Examples include "En ring til aa herske" (would typically be spelt "En ring til å herske"), "Naar himmelen klarner" (typically spelt "Når himmelen klarner"), "Belus' doed" (typically spelt "Belus' død"), "Morgenroede" (typically spelt "Morgenrøde"), and so on. Varg's spellings aren't even always consistent with each other, as demonstrated by the album ''Det som engang var'' versus the song "Det som en gang var". (Note that there are several different dialects of Norwegian, and spellings aren't always standardised between them. The most commonly ''written'' is Bokmål by far, with Nynorsk being a distant second; however, most speakers don't actually ''speak'' either Bokmål or Nynorsk as written, but rather a regional dialect that identifies their origins.)


* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Some of the official song titles don't match the most commonly used Norwegian spellings, likely because the font Varg used didn't have the å and ø characters. Examples include "En ring til aa herske" (would typically be spelt "En ring til å herske"), "Naar himmelen klarner" (typically spelt "Når himmelen klarner"), "Belus' doed" (typically spelt "Belus' død"), "Morgenroede" (typically spelt "Morgenrøde"), and so on. (Note that there are several different dialects of Norwegian and spellings aren't always standardised between them, though the most commonly spoken by far are Bokmål and Nynorsk.)

to:

* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Some of the official song titles don't match the most commonly used Norwegian spellings, likely because the font Varg used didn't have the å and ø characters. Examples include "En ring til aa herske" (would typically be spelt "En ring til å herske"), "Naar himmelen klarner" (typically spelt "Når himmelen klarner"), "Belus' doed" (typically spelt "Belus' død"), "Morgenroede" (typically spelt "Morgenrøde"), and so on. (Note that there are several different dialects of Norwegian Norwegian, and spellings aren't always standardised between them, though the them. The most commonly spoken by far are ''written'' is Bokmål and Nynorsk.by far, with Nynorsk being a distant second; however, most speakers don't actually ''speak'' either Bokmål or Nynorsk as written, but rather a regional dialect that identifies their origins.)


* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Some of the official song titles don't match the most commonly used Norwegian spellings, likely because the font Varg used didn't have the å and ø characters. Examples include "En ring til aa herske" (would typically be spelt "En ring til å herske"), "Naar himmelen klarner" (typically spelt "Når himmelen klarner"), "Belus' doed" (typically spelt "Belus' død"), "Morgenroede" (typically spelt "Morgenrøde"), and so on.

to:

* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Some of the official song titles don't match the most commonly used Norwegian spellings, likely because the font Varg used didn't have the å and ø characters. Examples include "En ring til aa herske" (would typically be spelt "En ring til å herske"), "Naar himmelen klarner" (typically spelt "Når himmelen klarner"), "Belus' doed" (typically spelt "Belus' død"), "Morgenroede" (typically spelt "Morgenrøde"), and so on. (Note that there are several different dialects of Norwegian and spellings aren't always standardised between them, though the most commonly spoken by far are Bokmål and Nynorsk.)

Added DiffLines:

* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Some of the official song titles don't match the most commonly used Norwegian spellings, likely because the font Varg used didn't have the å and ø characters. Examples include "En ring til aa herske" (would typically be spelt "En ring til å herske"), "Naar himmelen klarner" (typically spelt "Når himmelen klarner"), "Belus' doed" (typically spelt "Belus' død"), "Morgenroede" (typically spelt "Morgenrøde"), and so on.


* EpicRocking: About half of the songs he's recorded. ''Hvis lyset tar oss'', for example, is comprised of four tracks, the shortest of which is nearly eight minutes long.

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* EpicRocking: About half of the songs he's recorded. ''Hvis lyset tar oss'', for example, is comprised of four tracks, the shortest of which is nearly eight minutes long. His longest song is "Rundgang um die transzendentale Säule der Singularität", which is over twenty-five minutes in length, though it's a bit of a subversion as it's a repetitive ambient piece. His longest normal song is "Det som en gang var", which runs for 14:21 (although see Fading into the Next Song below).
* FadingIntoTheNextSong: Used occasionally. Perhaps the most noteworthy example is "Morgenrøde" into "Belus' tilbakekomst (konklusjon)", which together makes up a continuous suite of music that lasts for eighteen and a half minutes.


* EitherOrTitle: Sort of. There are two sets of titles for the songs on ''Filosofem''. One generally (with the exception of "Burzum", which is in the BlackSpeech of Mordor) matches the language of the lyrics (if there are any), meaning they're either in English or Norwegian (the first instrumental has a Norwegian title, while the second has an English one). The other set is in German. As mentioned above, the German titles are more commonly used, though Vikernes considers the Black Speech/English/Norwegian titles to be more accurate. The lyrics also feature German translations.

to:

* EitherOrTitle: Sort of. There are two sets of titles for the songs on ''Filosofem''. One generally (with the exception of "Burzum", which is in the BlackSpeech of Mordor) matches the language of the lyrics (if there are any), meaning they're either in English or Norwegian (the first instrumental has a Norwegian title, while the second has an English one). The other set is in German. As mentioned above, the German titles are more commonly used, though Vikernes considers the Black Speech/English/Norwegian Speech / English / Norwegian titles to be more accurate. The lyrics also feature German translations.

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