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* ''VideoGame/PrayerOfTheFaithless'': When Mia goes through the final section of Purgatory and tries to use the save point, the save point disappears and she's forced to run from [[spoiler:Gauron]] for the rest of the section. Fortunately, the save point after this section is real. Additionally, ignoring the false save point allows Mia to gain a slight head start on her pursuer.


* ''VideoGame/TouhouLunaNights'' had kitsune enemies disguise that disguise themselves as checkpoints and attack the player when they approach. You can spot the fake checkpoints by their tail poking out.

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* ''VideoGame/TouhouLunaNights'' had kitsune enemies disguise that disguise themselves as checkpoints and attack the player when they approach. You can spot the fake checkpoints beforehand by their tail poking out.

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* ''VideoGame/TouhouLunaNights'' had kitsune enemies disguise that disguise themselves as checkpoints and attack the player when they approach. You can spot the fake checkpoints by their tail poking out.


Instead you get blasted with an attack that drops your HPToOne and disables all your PowerUps and [[EquipmentBasedProgression Equipment]]. To top it all off, the statue transforms into a monster and gives chase.

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Instead you get blasted with an attack that drops your HPToOne HPTo1 and disables all your PowerUps and [[EquipmentBasedProgression Equipment]]. To top it all off, the statue transforms into a monster and gives chase.

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* Overhead lamps in ''VideoGame/AlanWake'' serve as checkpoints and healing spots, and briefly cause any Taken to despawn. Sometimes, you need to activate generators to turn the lights on. Part of one level sees you weaponless and running from a set of Taken, with a generator-powered light along the route. There isn't enough time to get the generator running before the Taken swarm you, but the only way to learn that is to try it.

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[[caption-width-right:300:This does ''not'' fill you with determination.]]

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* ''[[VideoGame/LaxiusForce Laxius Power 3]]'' has one save point in the Hall of Madness that after you use it, deploys a brutal boss called the Torture Maker which will chase you. Even if you manage to defeat him, he drops none other than a ''scratch'' amount of experience points.


--> PlayerName was killed by [[[YetAnotherStupidDeath Intentional Game Design]]]

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--> PlayerName [=PlayerName=] was killed by [[[YetAnotherStupidDeath Intentional Game Design]]]


You've fallen victim to a Treacherous Checkpoint, a subversion of the oft-encountered CheckPoint or SavePoint. It could be considered the opposite of a HealingCheckpoint (a Harming Checkpoint). It applies whenever the Checkpoint, which is usually always helpful to the player, becomes undesirable and better-avoided.

This trope is normally restricted to {{Platform Hell}}s, {{Deconstruction Game}}s, and the nastiest of NintendoHard games, for good reason. In the middle of a dungeon full of MalevolentArchitecture and EverythingTryingToKillYou the SavePoint may be, metaphorically, the player's only friend. A symbolic betrayal by this last friend may drive an already-aggravated player to RageQuit. But if used carefully, this can throw some ParanoiaFuel on an already-smoldering pyre: in a well-designed game a player expects the place where the game is ''saved'' to be, well, ''safe''. When the game betrays this expectation it hammers in the dread that ''nowhere'' is safe.

Compare PoisonMushroom and ChestMonster, in which hazards and monsters are disguised as desirable items. This trope can overlap but does not need to. And a treacherous Check Point can feel much crueler than treacherous loot because, unless the game uses a JustifiedSavePoint, it is not the ''characters'' within the game who are deceived by it: it is the ''player'' who is betrayed.

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You've fallen victim to a Treacherous Checkpoint, a subversion of the oft-encountered common CheckPoint or SavePoint. It could be considered the opposite of a HealingCheckpoint (a Harming Checkpoint). It applies whenever the Checkpoint, which is usually always helpful to the player, becomes undesirable and better-avoided.

This trope is normally restricted rare, mostly confined to {{Platform Hell}}s, {{Deconstruction Game}}s, and the nastiest of NintendoHard games, for good reason. games. In the middle of a dungeon full of MalevolentArchitecture and EverythingTryingToKillYou the SavePoint may be, metaphorically, be (metaphorically) the player's only friend. A symbolic betrayal by this last friend may drive an already-aggravated player to RageQuit. But if used carefully, this can throw some ParanoiaFuel on an already-smoldering pyre: in a well-designed game a player expects the place where the game is ''saved'' to be, well, ''safe''. When the game betrays this expectation it hammers in the dread that ''nowhere'' is safe.

Compare PoisonMushroom and ChestMonster, in which hazards and monsters are disguised as desirable items. This trope can overlap but does not need to. And a treacherous Check Point can feel much crueler than treacherous loot because, unless the game uses a JustifiedSavePoint, it is not the ''characters'' within the game who are deceived by it: it is deceived: the ''player'' who is betrayed.


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--> PlayerName was killed by [[[YetAnotherStupidDeath Intentional Game Design]]]


** In Crystal Peak, immediately following a gauntlet of laser-shooting enemies that a newer player will almost certainly lose health to, there's a bench occupied by what looks like a sleeping miner. Since they take up the ''entire'' bench, you can't sit on it unless you move them, and the only way to do that is to [[TooDumbToLive hit them, starting a boss battle]].

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** In Crystal Peak, immediately following a gauntlet of laser-shooting enemies that a newer player (that will almost certainly lose health to, there's harm some players), there is a bench occupied by what looks like a sleeping miner. miner's crystallized corpse. Since they take it takes up the ''entire'' bench, you can't cannot sit on it unless you move them, it, and [[DieChairDie the only way obvious way]] to do that is to [[TooDumbToLive hit them, starting whack it with your weapon. As soon as you do, it wakes up. HeWasRightThereAllAlong, and you now face the Crystal Guardian in a difficult boss battle]].fight.


** In Magus's castle, falling through a trap door in one room will land you in a large cavern with four apparent save points, one in each of the four cardinal directions. One ''is'' a save point, a second is actually a teleporter that will take you to the room you fell from, and the other two [[ChestMonster trigger battles]] with multiple fake save points. These switch around every time you fall into the room[[labelnote:Hint]]The two fake save points are always opposite each other, and the teleporter is always opposite the real save point[[/labelnote]]. It is not bad, though, as these monsters are {{MetalSlime}}s that cannot damage the player and drop an absolute ton of TechPoints upon death.

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** In Magus's castle, falling through a trap door in one room will land you in a large cavern with four apparent save points, one in each of the four cardinal directions. One ''is'' a save point, a second is actually a teleporter that will take you to the room you fell from, and the other two [[ChestMonster trigger battles]] with multiple fake save points. These switch around every time you fall into the room[[labelnote:Hint]]The two fake save points are always opposite each other, and the teleporter is always opposite the real save point[[/labelnote]]. It is not bad, though, as these monsters are {{MetalSlime}}s {{Metal Slime}}s that cannot damage the player and drop an absolute ton of TechPoints upon death.


Contrast PointOfNoReturn, a save point that may be ominous but not treacherous. If a fault in a game's checkpoint system makes it UnwinnableByMistake, it is a GameBreakingBug.

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Contrast PointOfNoReturn, a save point that may be ominous but not treacherous. If a fault in a game's checkpoint system makes it UnwinnableByMistake, UnintentionallyUnwinnable, it is a GameBreakingBug.

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* ''VideoGame/LastScenario'' has monsters disguised as save crystals, and you won't know if any given crystal is a monster ahead of time unless you've played through the game already.


* ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' has a SewerLevel full of subterranean monsters who will attack the party if they make any sound. After avoiding various noise-making hazards Crono and friends may gladly walk into a SavePoint, which makes a characteristic "ding"... which [[LeftTheBGMOn the monsters "hear"]] and rush out to attack. Once the monsters are defeated however, it works as well as any other save point.

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* ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' has a SewerLevel full of subterranean monsters who will attack the party if they make any sound. After avoiding various noise-making hazards Crono and friends may gladly walk into a SavePoint, which makes a characteristic "ding"... which [[LeftTheBGMOn [[LeftTheBackgroundMusicOn the monsters "hear"]] and rush out to attack. Once the monsters are defeated however, it works as well as any other save point.

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