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[[folder: Professional Wrestling]]
* In Wrestling/RingOfHonor, The Briscoes [[TheNicknamer nicknamed]] Wrestling/{{CHIKARA}}'s Wrestling/{{UltraMantis Black}}, who started his career as [=UltraMantis=] with the RedBaron "Part Insect, Part Superhero" and whose name and original image were influenced by the UsefulNotes/{{Japan}}ese TV series ''Series/{{UltraMan}}'', "Black Pelican," suggesting they are unable to tell the difference between an insect-themed mask and a bird-themed one.
[[/folder]]


* The 2005 TV movie ''Mansquito'', alternatively called ''Mosquito Man.'' Just the titles alone are enough to bring an entomologist to tears. Where to begin? [[CaptainObvious The title makes it obvious]], but the monster in the movie is a mutant hybrid between a mosquito and a human, a la ''Film/TheFly1986.'' The human in question is male, yet as Mansquito, he goes around killing people and drinking their blood. What makes it worse is that the movie actually ''does'' include a female human/mosquito hybrid, but she's mostly harmless and is also the protagonist, even if she ''does'' crave blood as well. To add insult to injury, Mansquito begins stalking her so they can mate and start a species of freakish humansquitoes. Mind you, the female is a scientist and the male is a convict she was experimenting on. Apparently, it was too hard to swap the genders and have a male protagonist who only feeds on fruits and veggies, since, [[SarcasmMode as we all know]], [[DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale it's impossible for a female to stalk a male so she mate with him against his will]].

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* The 2005 TV movie ''Mansquito'', alternatively called ''Mosquito Man.'' Just the titles alone are enough to bring an entomologist to tears. Where to begin? [[CaptainObvious The title makes it obvious]], but the monster in the movie is a mutant hybrid between a mosquito and a human, a la ''Film/TheFly1986.'' The human in question is male, yet as Mansquito, he goes around killing people and drinking their blood. What makes it worse is that the movie actually ''does'' include a female human/mosquito hybrid, but she's mostly harmless and is also the protagonist, even if she ''does'' crave blood as well. To add insult to injury, Mansquito begins stalking her so they can mate and start a species of freakish humansquitoes. Mind you, the female is a scientist and the male is a convict she was experimenting on. Apparently, it was too hard to swap the genders and have a male protagonist who only feeds on fruits and veggies, since, [[SarcasmMode as we all know]], [[DoubleStandardRapeFemaleOnMale it's impossible for a female to stalk a male so she mate with him against his will]].


* ''Film/DrNo'' did it twice with spiders. First, Dr. No's [[TheDragon dragon]] tried to kill Film/JamesBond by putting a very large tarantula in his bed while he slept. Even if it bit him (it didn't), it would've just hurt a lot. Later, Honey Ryder tells Bond that she killed her landlord [[RapeAsBackStory after he raped her]] by putting a female black widow on his bed, and that it took the guy a week to die. She got very lucky: contrary to urban legend, black widow bites are rarely fatal to humans.

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* ''Film/DrNo'' did it twice with spiders. First, Dr. No's [[TheDragon dragon]] tried to kill Film/JamesBond by putting a very large tarantula in his bed while he slept. Even if it bit him (it didn't), it would've just hurt a lot. Later, Honey Ryder tells Bond that she killed her landlord [[RapeAsBackStory after he raped her]] by putting a female black widow on his bed, and that it took the guy a week to die. She got very lucky: contrary to urban legend, black widow bites are rarely fatal to humans.humans (they do hurt like hell, though, and can make humans very sick).


* An arachnid's limbs are attached to the first of their two body segments (the prosoma) and the insect's the second of their three (the thorax). They are not proportioned or configured like anything remotely resembling a human or a dog.
* What most people refer to as a "wild" beehive is actually a mix between an antique bee skep and a hornet's nest. ''Actual'' wild beehives look like [[http://archives.starbulletin.com/1999/08/09/features/artb.jpg this]] or [[http://www.volcanoislandhoney.com/photos/puako/7-WildBee.jpg this]].
** Also, there's the common mistake of calling wasps "bees". Phylogenetically, all bees are wasps, not the other way around. (And so are ants - biology is very confusing.)
** Not to mention depicting all wasps and hornets as honey-makers. Bees make honey because they gather pollen from flowers, and while wasps are nectar-feeders as well, they generally do not produce honey. Hornets meanwhile have no excuse, as they are carnivores and eat other insects. That said, some species of wasps and hornets do make honey, but it is inedible.

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* An arachnid's limbs are attached to the first of their two body segments (the prosoma) and the insect's the second of their three (the thorax). They are not proportioned or configured like anything remotely resembling a human or a dog.
dog. Additionally, insects and arachnids are almost always portrayed as having legs that taper to a point. In reality their legs always end in a tarsus (equivalent to the toes on vertebrates) which usually sports two claws; it's just that the tarsi are so ''tiny'' in many cases that it's hard to see them with the naked eye. The only arthropods that have pointed tips to the legs in real life are crustaceans.
* What most people refer to as a "wild" beehive is actually a mix between an antique bee skep and a hornet's nest. ''Actual'' wild beehives look like [[http://archives.starbulletin.com/1999/08/09/features/artb.jpg this]] or [[http://www.volcanoislandhoney.com/photos/puako/7-WildBee.jpg this]].
this]]. See StockBeehive for more on the subject.
** Also, there's the common mistake of calling wasps "bees". Phylogenetically, "bees", or mistaking hornets for other kinds of wasps. Referring to wasps as bees would be like calling every primate a "chimpanzee" - phylogenetically, all bees are wasps, not the other way around. (And so are ants - biology is very confusing.)
) Hornets, meanwhile, are also a specific ''type'' of wasp, but are distinguished from other vespine wasps by the relatively large top margin of the head and by the rounded segment of the abdomen just behind the waist.
** Not to mention depicting all wasps and hornets as honey-makers. Bees make honey because they gather pollen from flowers, and while wasps are nectar-feeders as well, and hornets have diets that can vary from nectar-feeding to omnivorous to outright predatory, they generally do not produce honey. Hornets meanwhile have no excuse, as they are carnivores and eat other insects. That (That said, some species of wasps and hornets do ''do'' make honey, but it is inedible.)



* Speaking of legs, insects and arachnids are almost always portrayed as having legs that taper to a point. In reality their legs always end in a tarsus (equivalent to the toes on vertebrates) which usually sports two claws; it's just that the tarsi are so *tiny* in many cases that it's hard to see them with the naked eye. The only arthropods that have pointed tips to the legs in real life are crustaceans.


* Insects, arachnids, crustaceans and myriapods all do not have jaws that open and close like a vertebrate's, and they do not have teeth or tongues like we do.
* While a mosquito's proboscis is syringe-shaped(Though partially covered by a sheathe), it's certainly not positioned anywhere near where the nose would be on a vertebrate.

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* Insects, arachnids, crustaceans and myriapods all do not have jaws that open and close like a vertebrate's, and they do not have teeth or tongues like we do.
* While
do, though stylization of cartoon insect mouths to a jagged beak can be partly forgiven due to the labrum and paired maxillae sort of resembling one (more info [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insect_mouthparts here]]). Even depictions with proper mouthparts often get their appearance wrong, though. To list just two examples: spider fangs always point downwards, not inwards towards each other like insect mandibles, and aren't used to suck the juices from prey (they have a tiny mouth-hole which is what regurgitates enzymes and does the sucking afterwards); and while a mosquito's proboscis is syringe-shaped(Though syringe-shaped (though partially covered by a sheathe), it's certainly not positioned anywhere near where the nose would be on a vertebrate.



** Not to mention depicting all wasps and hornets as honey-makers. Bees make honey because they gather pollen from flowers, whereas wasps and hornets are carnivores and eat other insects. That said, some species of wasps and hornets do make honey, but it is inedible.

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** Not to mention depicting all wasps and hornets as honey-makers. Bees make honey because they gather pollen from flowers, whereas and while wasps and hornets are nectar-feeders as well, they generally do not produce honey. Hornets meanwhile have no excuse, as they are carnivores and eat other insects. That said, some species of wasps and hornets do make honey, but it is inedible.



* An appalling number of films, stories, and UrbanLegends attribute a parasitoid reproductive strategy -- i.e. FaceFullOfAlienWingWong -- to arthropods that don't do any such thing, purely for BodyHorror's sake. In reality, only certain wasps and flies breed that way, but in fiction it's often associated with beetles or spiders.
* Very often in fiction when a cockroach is needed a Madagascar hissing cockroach is used as a substitute, as they are larger than the local roaches and fairly placid. As the name suggests, they can only be found in the wild in Madagascar.
** And it's not just roaches: ''every'' scuttling insect that's not an ant may be played by a "hisser" in a pinch. Likewise, maggots, caterpillars, and ''earthworms'' (which aren't even arthropods) are commonly played by mealworms, which are beetle larvae cheaply available at any pet store.

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* An appalling number of films, stories, and UrbanLegends attribute a parasitoid reproductive strategy -- i.e. FaceFullOfAlienWingWong -- to arthropods that don't do any such thing, purely for BodyHorror's sake. In reality, only certain wasps and flies breed that way, but in fiction it's often associated with beetles or spiders.
spiders (the latter of which actually have the egg-laying hole near the ''front'' of the abdomen, and wrap their eggs in a ball of silk for protection, being unable to implant their eggs inside anything).
* Very often in fiction when a cockroach is needed a Madagascar hissing cockroach is used as a substitute, as they are larger than the local roaches and fairly placid. As the name suggests, they can only be found in the wild in Madagascar.
** And it's not just roaches:
Madagascar. This isn't limited to roaches, either: ''every'' scuttling insect that's not an ant may be played by a "hisser" in a pinch. Likewise, maggots, caterpillars, and ''earthworms'' (which aren't even arthropods) are commonly played by mealworms, which are beetle larvae cheaply available at any pet store.



* Praying mantises will usually be drawn having their arms ending at the tibia, lacking the tarsus at the end which is used for walking.

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* Praying mantises will usually be drawn having their arms ending at the tibia, lacking the tarsus at the end which is used for walking. The popularly cited "fact" that they eat their mates is also false, at least in the wild - the recorded cases of such have almost always happened in captivity, complete with confined spaces and artificial conditions.
* Speaking of legs, insects and arachnids are almost always portrayed as having legs that taper to a point. In reality their legs always end in a tarsus (equivalent to the toes on vertebrates) which usually sports two claws; it's just that the tarsi are so *tiny* in many cases that it's hard to see them with the naked eye. The only arthropods that have pointed tips to the legs in real life are crustaceans.
* Every single spider in fiction will be associated with web-making and silk production. Not all spiders produce webs to hunt, with some preferring to stalk or chase after prey, and even those that do exhibit more variety in web-shapes than the net-like orb-weaver-style net most often seen in fiction, with some like those of the notorious black widow spider looking more like tangles of silken threads without a distinct pattern. A few spiders even hunt from burrows lined with silk that acts as tripwires, but they're SeldomSeenSpecies anyway.


* A filler arc of ''{{Naruto}}'' brings us "bees" that are very obviously hornets (although this is a translation error since the word 'hachi' can refer to either bees or wasps), a 12-foot beetle with a trunk (it trumpets like an elephant, too) and cockroaches which don't look or move like cockroaches.

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* ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'':
**
A filler arc of ''{{Naruto}}'' brings us "bees" that are very obviously hornets (although this is a translation error since the word 'hachi' can refer to either bees or wasps), a 12-foot beetle with a trunk (it trumpets like an elephant, too) and cockroaches which don't look or move like cockroaches.



* In-story example: SpiderMan is always being called an "insect" by his foes. He always corrects them.

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* In-story example: SpiderMan ComicBook/SpiderMan is always being called an "insect" by his foes. He always corrects them.


Subtrope of YouFailBiologyForever. Supertrope of InsectGenderBender, FourLeggedInsect, and StockBeehive. See also FunnyAnimalAnatomy.

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Subtrope of YouFailBiologyForever.ArtisticLicenseBiology. Supertrope of InsectGenderBender, FourLeggedInsect, and StockBeehive. See also FunnyAnimalAnatomy.


** [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in both cases. Calvin is six years old and, while he is certainly intelligent, he doesn't pay attention in class unless it involves dinosaurs. It's not surprising that his understanding of entomology would be a [[{{Pun}} mite]] unreliable.



** Not only this but we have many arthropods that fall as Bug-type. We have spiders, scorpions, centipedes, hermit crabs, trilobites and even some kind of rock mollusk.

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** Not only this but we have many arthropods that fall as Bug-type. We have spiders, scorpions, centipedes, hermit crabs, trilobites and even some kind of rock mollusk. Strangely, the Dwebble line (based on hermit crabs) are Bug-type but the Krabby line (based on sand bubbler crabs) aren't.

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[[folder: Other]]
* Lampshaded and discussed annually at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana's [[https://explorecu.org/items/show/319 Insect Fear Film Festival]], at which the Entomology Graduate Student Association displays movies with examples of this trope, then lets viewers handle living examples of the featured arthropods, while explaining what the films got wrong.
[[/folder]]


** Later, the characters are attacked by a massive swarm of ants. Indy calls them 'Siafu'; which is a native name for Driver ants, which only live in Africa. [[MisplacedWildlife The story is set in South America]], which does have terrifying carnivorous ants, but these are members of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Army_ant a different subfamily of ants]].

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** Later, the characters are attacked by a massive swarm of ants. Indy calls them 'Siafu'; which is a native name for Driver ants, which only live in Africa. [[MisplacedWildlife The story is set in South America]], which does have terrifying carnivorous ants, but these are members of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Army_ant a different subfamily of ants]]. Possibly justified, as Indy could have encountered African siafu before and just called the New World equivalents by the first name that popped into his head.


One common example is [[InsectGenderBender humans imposing inappropriate gender roles on insects]]. Often, the colonies of eusocial hymenopteran insects (bees, wasps, and ants) are depicted in cartoons as having male workers, whereas in RealLife, all the workers are female in almost all species (there are a few ant species with males that assist the female workers, but they are a very small minority of species). (The "no male workers" rule applies only to eusocial insects in the order Hymenoptera, however. Termites are eusocial and they have both male and female workers.) Another example is the appearance of a blood-sucking male mosquito. Only female mosquitoes suck blood.

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One common example is [[InsectGenderBender humans imposing inappropriate gender roles on insects]]. Often, the colonies of eusocial hymenopteran insects (bees, wasps, and ants) are depicted in cartoons as having male workers, whereas in RealLife, all the workers are female in almost all species (there are a few ant species with males that assist the female workers, but they are a very small minority of species). (The The "no male workers" rule applies only to eusocial insects in the order Hymenoptera, however. Termites are eusocial and they have both male and female workers.) Another example is the appearance of a blood-sucking male mosquito. Only female mosquitoes suck blood.
blood (this doesn't apply to other types of bloodsucking flies, however).


* In one arc of ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'', Calvin adds an earthworm to his insect collection because "worms are bugs". Earthworms are from a separate phylum (Annelida) than insects (Arthropoda). Although it's better than in a later arc where he thinks ''bats'' are bugs.

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* In one arc of ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'', Calvin adds an earthworm to his insect collection because "worms are bugs". Earthworms are from a separate phylum (Annelida) than insects (Arthropoda). Although Entomologists may be spared some weeping by the fact that Calvin may not actually think worms are bugs; he's just desperate to fill out his collection with ANYTHING (he has only two actual insects; other items include the worm, a smashed spider, and "a piece of lint that looks like a bug") before class starts. At least it's better than in a later arc where he thinks ''bats'' are bugs.bugs (in this one Hobbes tries to point out Calvin's error early on, and as soon as Calvin starts reading his report in class the entire class yells in unison "Bats aren't bugs!").


* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretSaturdays'': Munya is supposed to transform into a spider/human hybrid, but looks much more like a red ''IncredibleHulk'' with fangs, claws and four tiny legs poking out of his back.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretSaturdays'': Munya is supposed to transform into a spider/human hybrid, but looks much more like a red ''IncredibleHulk'' ''ComicBook/IncredibleHulk'' with fangs, claws and four tiny legs poking out of his back.


* ''WesternAnimation/BeeMovie'' has male worker bees and a blood-sucking male mosquito named Mooseblood. The insects have four legs. The bees also have parents. This is however called out in the court scene to invoke [[BatmanGambit getting stung by the leads best friend]] to win over the court. Said be is male and survives by getting a transplant.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BeeMovie'' has male worker bees and a blood-sucking male mosquito named Mooseblood. The insects have four legs. The bees also have parents. This is however called out in the court scene to invoke [[BatmanGambit getting stung by the leads best friend]] to win over the court. Said be bee is male and survives by getting a transplant.


* Pretty much everyone, in fiction and out of it, refers to every insect (and arthropods in general) at some point or another as a bug. In entomology, a bug only refers to the order Hemiptera, aka "true bugs", which contains insects like aphids and cicadas.

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* Pretty much everyone, in fiction and out of it, refers to every insect (and arthropods in general) at some point or another as a bug. In entomology, a bug only refers to the order Hemiptera, aka "true bugs", which contains insects like aphids and cicadas. The common identifier of a "true bug" is a rigid proboscis for feeding.

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