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[[caption-width-right:350:Are we even sure there's a ''room'' behind that door?]]


While this can be TruthInTelevision, ''please'' [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement think twice]] before posting RealLife examples.

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While this can be TruthInTelevision, ''please'' [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment think twice]] before posting RealLife examples.


* In the WesternAnimation/{{Classic Disney Short|s}} ''Disney/PlutosJudgementDay'', Pluto has a nightmare where he is tried in hell by devil cats for the crime of attacking cats (which Pluto did earlier in the cartoon). As shown in the page image, the jury literally goes in and out a revolving door before finding him guilty, and the jurors leave so quickly that the first to enter come out before the rest have even come in.

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* In the WesternAnimation/{{Classic Disney Short|s}} ''Disney/PlutosJudgementDay'', Pluto has a nightmare where he is tried in hell by devil cats for the crime of attacking cats (which Pluto did earlier in the cartoon).cartoon and which, because of it, Mickey Mouse warns his dog that he will have a lot to answer for on judgment day). As shown in the page image, the jury literally goes in and out a revolving door before finding him guilty, and the jurors leave so quickly that the first to enter come out before the rest have even come in.


* The OJ Simpson Murder trial was the longest trial in U.S. History, beginning on January 24,1995 to October 3rd, 1995 (the jury was sworn in on November 9th, 1994, so they were attached to it for the better part of a year). The decision was rendered in four hours on October 2nd, 1995, but the judge held it off for a day due to the sheer size of the trial.

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* The OJ Simpson Murder trial was the longest trial in U.S. History, beginning on January 24,1995 24, 1995 to October 3rd, 1995 (the 1995. The jury was sworn in on November 9th, 1994, so they were attached to it for the better part of a year).year. The decision was rendered in four hours on October 2nd, 1995, but the judge held it off for a day due to the sheer size of the trial. Some years thereafter, at least a couple of the jurors publicly came forward and admitted that it was exactly because of the very lengthy trial that they jumped to the the verdict so quickly. At that point, they were simply utterly exhausted from being held up at the trial for nearly a year and just wanted to go home.


* In the WesternAnimation/{{Classic Disney Short|s}} ''WesternAnimation/PlutosJudgementDay'', Pluto has a nightmare where he is tried in hell by devil cats for the crime of attacking cats (which Pluto did earlier in the cartoon). As shown in the page image, the jury literally goes in and out a revolving door before finding him guilty, and the jurors leave so quickly that the first to enter come out before the rest have even come in.

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* In the WesternAnimation/{{Classic Disney Short|s}} ''WesternAnimation/PlutosJudgementDay'', ''Disney/PlutosJudgementDay'', Pluto has a nightmare where he is tried in hell by devil cats for the crime of attacking cats (which Pluto did earlier in the cartoon). As shown in the page image, the jury literally goes in and out a revolving door before finding him guilty, and the jurors leave so quickly that the first to enter come out before the rest have even come in.


* In the WesternAnimation/{{Classic Disney Short|s}} ''WesternAnimation/PlutosJudgementDay'', Pluto has a nightmare where he is tried in hell by devil cats for the crime of attacking cats (which Pluto did earlier in the cartoon). As shown in the page image, the jury literally goes in and out a revolving door before finding him guilty.

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* In the WesternAnimation/{{Classic Disney Short|s}} ''WesternAnimation/PlutosJudgementDay'', Pluto has a nightmare where he is tried in hell by devil cats for the crime of attacking cats (which Pluto did earlier in the cartoon). As shown in the page image, the jury literally goes in and out a revolving door before finding him guilty.guilty, and the jurors leave so quickly that the first to enter come out before the rest have even come in.



* In the Clay Shaw trial (made famous by the movie ''Film/{{JFK}}''), the jury took fifteen minutes - including the bathroom break - to acquit Shaw of conspiracy to murder John F. Kennedy.
* The OJ Simpson Murder trial was the longest trial in U.S. History, beginning on January 24,1995 to October 3rd, 1995 (the jury was sworn in on November 9th, 1994, so they were attached to it for the better part of a year). The decision was rendered in 4 hours on October 2nd, 1995, but the judge held it off for a day due to the sheer size of the trial.

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* In the Clay Shaw trial (made famous by the movie ''Film/{{JFK}}''), the jury took fifteen minutes - -- including the bathroom break - -- to acquit Shaw of conspiracy to murder John F. Kennedy.
* The OJ Simpson Murder trial was the longest trial in U.S. History, beginning on January 24,1995 to October 3rd, 1995 (the jury was sworn in on November 9th, 1994, so they were attached to it for the better part of a year). The decision was rendered in 4 four hours on October 2nd, 1995, but the judge held it off for a day due to the sheer size of the trial.

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* ''Series/TokusouSentaiDekaranger'': Subverted. The Dekarangers' [[TransformationTrinket Licenses]] have a special mode that sends all known evidence and current bioreadings to "the highest court in the galaxy", getting a verdict back in eight seconds. The subversion comes from the "Ten Years Later" reunion special, which explains that the court handling the judgements is on a planet surrounded by a temporal distortion... so for every case, they've actually spent eight ''[[YearInsideHourOutside months]]'' deliberating.

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* ''Series/{{Batman}}'': One episode ends with the Joker and Catwoman being tried. Their lawyer doesn't cross-examine any witnesses brought by the prosecution and doesn't try to introduce any evidence that could help his clients so it's not much of a surprise the jury's leader declares there's no need to step out of the court to deliberate. [[spoiler:The surprise is that they decide to acquit the defendants. When said juror's mustache starts falling, Batman figures out Catwoman and the Joker had their henchmen as the jury and they end up being arrested.]]

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** Despite the quick turn around, this is actually a subversion. It takes a couple hours of deliberation to find Tom guilty and while the reader is supposed to see this as unusually short for a rape trial with so much disproved evidence, the crowd in the court believe this is an unusually long time to return a deliberation, especially a guilty verdict and it is [[HopeSpot implied that there was at least one]] RogueJuror [[HopeSpot in the room.]]


* In this [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfTGxaZzICk commercial]] for Value City Furniture a woman who says she got her new bedroom for "a steal" is busted by one of her friends who is wearing a HiddenWire.

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* In this [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfTGxaZzICk com/watch?v=IBWImNSV0Z0 commercial]] for Value City Furniture a woman who says she got her new bedroom for "a steal" is busted by one of her friends who is wearing a HiddenWire.


* In ''Literature/ToKillAMockingbird'' the jury on Tom Robinson's trial comes back with a verdict very quickly. Because they're all bigoted white southern men in a setting before The Civil Rights Movement, they found the black man on trial guilty almost immediately, despite having lots of facts presented to them that indicated he wasn't. But of course, they take almost no time to consider them. In actuality, the trope was at least partially averted. It took several hours to return the guilty verdict, rather than "almost immediately". It may be a short deliberation for a rape trial resulting in a (grossly unjust!) verdict of guilty and sentence of death, but it was a lot longer than expected. Atticus Finch actually notes that a speedy deliberation was ''usually'' the case with a black defendant (due to aforementioned bigoted southern men). The jury is in and out again in a few minutes. However, here, according to Atticus Finch, one of the jurors was advocating for outright acquittal and it took several hours to wear him down.

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* In ''Literature/ToKillAMockingbird'' the jury on Tom Robinson's trial comes back with a verdict very quickly. Because they're all bigoted white southern men in a setting before The Civil Rights Movement, they found the black man on trial guilty almost immediately, despite having lots of facts presented to them that indicated he wasn't. But of course, they take almost no time to consider them. In actuality, the trope was at least partially averted. It took several hours to return the guilty verdict, rather than "almost immediately". It may be a short deliberation for a rape trial resulting in a (grossly unjust!) verdict of guilty and sentence of death, but it was a lot longer than expected. Atticus Finch actually notes that a speedy deliberation was ''usually'' the case with a black defendant (due to aforementioned bigoted southern men). The jury is in and out again in a few minutes. However, here, according to Atticus Finch, one of the jurors was advocating for outright acquittal and it took several hours to wear him down.

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* A footnote in one of A P Herbert's ''Misleading Cases in the Common Law'':
--> In Rex v Strauss (1928) 9 Cr App R 91, a bailiff acting for the Inland Revenue was struck and killed with a book of sermons while removing, from the premises of the accused, a wireless set belonging to the accused; as well as two Rabbits, the property of a favourite daughter. The defence was that distress for income tax was a gross provocation comparable to the discovery of a wife in the arms of another (see Rex v Mouldy, 1 Ventris 158), and such as to produce an uncontrollable impulse depriving a man of the ordinary powers of self-control. The jury, without leaving the box, returned a verdict of 'Justifiable Homicide'; but the following day was Derby Day, and therefore the decision is not regarded as settled law.


* ''WesternAnimation/SuperFriends'' episode "The Menace of the White Dwarf". The supervillain Raven puts Superman on trial. At the end of the trial the jurors find Superman guilty without even leaving the jury box or deliberating. It's justified in this case because the jury is made up of Raven's robots, who are programmed to find Superman guilty.

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* ''WesternAnimation/SuperFriends'' 1973-74 episode "The Menace of the White Dwarf". The supervillain Raven puts Superman on trial. At the end of the trial the jurors find Superman guilty without even leaving the jury box or deliberating. It's justified in this case because the jury is made up of Raven's robots, who are programmed to find Superman guilty.


* ''Series/TheFlash'': Barry mentions on the third episode that (because the evidence wouldn't make sense otherwise, understandably because it was impossible to believe that [[spoiler:a speedster from the future]] could have done it) the case to convict Dr. Henry Allen for the murder of his wife was so iron-clad that it only took the jury 52 minutes to declare him guilty.

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* ''Series/TheFlash'': ''Series/TheFlash2014'': Barry mentions on the third episode that (because the evidence wouldn't make sense otherwise, understandably because it was impossible to believe that [[spoiler:a speedster from the future]] could have done it) the case to convict Dr. Henry Allen for the murder of his wife was so iron-clad that it only took the jury 52 minutes to declare him guilty.

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