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** Seldom Bucket, the cheesemaker from ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}'', has an advertisment in ''The Compleat Ankh-Morpork City Guide'' for his "Mostly Cheese Spreads".

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** Seldom Bucket, the cheesemaker from ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}'', ''Literature/{{Maskerade}}'', has an advertisment in ''The Compleat Ankh-Morpork City Guide'' for his "Mostly Cheese Spreads".


* There are no real rules on calling an animal something it's not just to make it sound more appetizing to people. Therefore, the Patagonian toothfish is better known as "Chilean sea bass", "dolphinfish" becomes "mahi mahi", and "king crab" is promoted as such despite biologically being closer to crayfish than real crabs. None of this, though, detracts from the actual quality of the product.

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* There are no real rules on [[CallASmeerpARabbit calling an animal something it's not not]] just to make it sound more appetizing to people. Therefore, the Patagonian toothfish is better known as "Chilean sea bass", "dolphinfish" becomes "mahi mahi", and "king crab" is promoted as such despite biologically being closer to crayfish than real crabs. None of this, though, detracts from the actual quality of the product.



** A common myth about UsefulNotes/KentuckyFriedChicken is that the chain's name [[http://www.snopes.com/horrors/food/kfc.asp was changed to KFC, because they're not legally allowed to include "Chicken" in the title.]] The rumors said that Yum! Foods, the umbrella company that owns KFC, Taco Bell, and Pizza Hut, had genetically engineered "Creature 57", variously suspected to be a headless and eight-legged chicken or some sort of shmoo-like monstrosity whose flesh could be processed in different ways to create the various meat-ish substances that their various chains use. For the record, they actually changed it because of the negative consumer connotations that went along with the word "fried". ([[http://www.snopes.com/lost/kfc.asp The competing claim]] that it's ''really'' because the state of Kentucky opportunistically trademarked the name looks legit right up until you notice that it's filed under "[[FunWithAcronyms The Repository Of Lost Legends]]".)

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** A common myth about UsefulNotes/KentuckyFriedChicken (referenced in ''Literature/AmericanGods'') is that the chain's name [[http://www.snopes.com/horrors/food/kfc.asp was changed to KFC, because they're not legally allowed to include "Chicken" in the title.]] The rumors said that Yum! Foods, the umbrella company that owns KFC, Taco Bell, and Pizza Hut, had genetically engineered "Creature 57", variously suspected to be a headless and eight-legged chicken or some sort of shmoo-like monstrosity whose flesh could be processed in different ways to create the various meat-ish substances that their various chains use. For the record, they actually changed it because of the negative consumer connotations that went along with the word "fried". ([[http://www.snopes.com/lost/kfc.asp The competing claim]] that it's ''really'' because the state of Kentucky opportunistically trademarked the name looks legit right up until you notice that it's filed under "[[FunWithAcronyms The Repository Of Lost Legends]]".)

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** This is also becoming the case with bacon, and may affect ham, corned beef and other cured meats in the future.


* Hamburger vs. Ground Beef vs. Ground [whatever cut]. The main differences between the first two is whether or not any extra fat can be added. Both are made from leftover trimmings of various cuts, even high quality ones like prime rib. (With ground beef, no extra fat can be added. With hamburger, so long as the ''total'' fat does not exceed 30%, extra fat can be added from any cut.) With ground [whatever cut], all the lean and fat ''must'' [[ShapedLikeItself come from the specified cut]]. And then you get into "lean" and "extra lean" ground beef, which is about the ratio of fat to actual meat. That can be a trade-off; lean and extra-lean ground beef are lower in fat and cholesterol (which can be appealing to health-conscious consumers, but somewhat less flavorful than their "regular" counterparts.

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* Hamburger vs. Ground Beef vs. Ground [whatever cut]. The main differences between the first two is whether or not any extra fat can be added. Both are made from leftover trimmings of various cuts, even high quality ones like prime rib. (With ground beef, no extra fat can be added. With hamburger, so long as the ''total'' fat does not exceed 30%, extra fat can be added from any cut.) With ground [whatever cut], all the lean and fat ''must'' [[ShapedLikeItself come from the specified cut]]. And then you get into "lean" and "extra lean" ground beef, which is about the ratio of fat to actual meat. That can be a trade-off; lean and extra-lean ground beef are lower in fat and cholesterol (which can be appealing to health-conscious consumers, consumers), but somewhat less flavorful than their "regular" counterparts.


* Lean Textured Beef, or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_slime pink slime]] has been used as an additive to ground beef and pet foods since early in the millennium. Composed of parts no one would consider meat and treated with chemicals no one would consider edible, the beef lobby insists that it qualifies as beef but no one has attempted to sell it by itself to consumers. Indeed, media reports in 2012 caused a massive backlash against it, leading to retailers and restaurant chains quickly dropping the additive from their ground beef offerings. Incidentally, this product is illegal in Canada and the EU.

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* Lean Textured Beef, or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_slime pink slime]] has been used as an additive to ground beef and pet foods since early in the millennium. Composed of parts no one would consider meat and treated with chemicals no one would consider edible, the beef lobby insists that it qualifies as beef but no one has attempted to sell it by itself to consumers. Indeed, media reports an ABC News report in 2012 caused a massive backlash against it, leading to retailers and restaurant chains quickly dropping the additive from their ground beef offerings. Its largest producer, Beef Products Inc., sued ABC for defamation due to the lost business forcing them to close most of its plants; both settled out of court in 2017. Incidentally, this product is illegal in Canada and the EU.EU due to the ammonia used in its production, though the similar Finely Textured Beef (which uses citric acid instead) is legal in Canada under certain conditions.


Lite Creme products may in fact taste like "normal" foods anyway, and brands being sold ''directly'' as food replacements (such as vegan) directly advertise as such. In general, as AllNaturalSnakeOil can tell you, there's nothing particularly wrong with something being a processed food in and of itself, and things that are "natural" can be just as unhealthy as Froot Choco-Cheez. Generally though, Lite Creme in the public image brings to mind bizarre concoctions of usually unhealthy additives.

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Lite Creme products may in fact taste like "normal" foods anyway, and brands being sold ''directly'' as food replacements (such as vegan) directly advertise as such. In general, as AllNaturalSnakeOil can tell you, there's nothing particularly wrong with something being a processed food in and of itself, and things that are "natural" can be just as unhealthy as Froot Choco-Cheez. Generally though, Lite Creme in the public image brings to mind bizarre concoctions of usually unhealthy additives.
additives. See also AsbestosFreeCereal and TheCoconutEffect.


* The 1984 Christmas special of ''Series/YesMinister'', "Party Games," gives us an invocation: An [[UsefulNotes/EuropeanUnion EEC]] regulation regarding sausages was in the works that would force the vast majority of British bangers to be sold not as sausages but as "emulsified high-fat offal tubes" because they consisted mostly of fillers like fat, entrails, and fillers rather than actual meat. By the end of the episode, however, Hacker gets the Eurocrats to agree to allow them to be sold instead as "British sausages," a feat he rides to Number Ten.

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* The 1984 Christmas special of ''Series/YesMinister'', "Party Games," gives us an invocation: An [[UsefulNotes/EuropeanUnion EEC]] regulation regarding sausages was in the works that would force the vast majority of British bangers to be sold not as sausages but as "emulsified high-fat offal tubes" because they consisted mostly of fillers like fat, entrails, and fillers bread rusk rather than actual meat. By the end of the episode, however, Hacker gets the Eurocrats to agree to allow them to be sold instead as "British sausages," a feat he rides to Number Ten.


* The 1984 Christmas special of ''Series/YesMinister'', "Party Games," gives us an invocation: A [[UsefulNotes/EuropeanUnion European Community]] regulation regarding sausages was in the works that would force the vast majority of British bangers to be sold not as sausages but as "emulsified high-fat offal tubes" because they consisted mostly of fillers like fat, entrails, and fillers rather than actual meat. By the end of the episode, however, Hacker gets the Eurocrats to agree to allow them to be sold instead as "British sausages," a feat he rides to Number Ten.

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* The 1984 Christmas special of ''Series/YesMinister'', "Party Games," gives us an invocation: A An [[UsefulNotes/EuropeanUnion European Community]] EEC]] regulation regarding sausages was in the works that would force the vast majority of British bangers to be sold not as sausages but as "emulsified high-fat offal tubes" because they consisted mostly of fillers like fat, entrails, and fillers rather than actual meat. By the end of the episode, however, Hacker gets the Eurocrats to agree to allow them to be sold instead as "British sausages," a feat he rides to Number Ten.

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* The 1984 Christmas special of ''Series/YesMinister'', "Party Games," gives us an invocation: A [[UsefulNotes/EuropeanUnion European Community]] regulation regarding sausages was in the works that would force the vast majority of British bangers to be sold not as sausages but as "emulsified high-fat offal tubes" because they consisted mostly of fillers like fat, entrails, and fillers rather than actual meat. By the end of the episode, however, Hacker gets the Eurocrats to agree to allow them to be sold instead as "British sausages," a feat he rides to Number Ten.


* Potato Chips vs 'Potato Crisps'. The ones in the can, like Pringles and Lay's Stax, can't legally be called 'chips' because they're pressed, ground up potatoes with other ingredients mixed in. That being said, Pringles originally just called them crisps because "Pringles" was a classy British-sounding word and [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign the word "crisps" was used to reinforce that classy air]].
** [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage Of course, all "chips" (in the American sense) are crisps]].

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* Potato Chips vs 'Potato Crisps'. The ones "Potato chips" vs. "Potato crisps" in the can, like US. Pringles and Lay's Stax, can't legally be called 'chips' because were originally marketed as "Newfangled Potato Chips", but competing manufacturers complained that Pringles did not meet the definition of a potato chip (instead of being fried slices of potatoes, they're pressed, ground up potatoes actually fried dough with other ingredients mixed in. That being said, only 42% actual potato content), which led to the FDA ruling in 1975 that the product could only use "chip" within the appellation "potato chips made from dried potatoes". Instead of using such an unpalatable name, Pringles originally just called them crisps because "Pringles" was a classy British-sounding word and [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign were rebranded as "crisps", which neatly solved the word "crisps" was used problem but eventually led to reinforce that classy air]].
**
similar complaints in the UK due to [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage Of course, all "chips" (in linguistic differences]]. Lay's Stax, which are very similar to Pringles, also uses the American sense) are crisps]]."crisps" term.

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* Hamburger vs. Ground Beef vs. Ground [whatever cut]. The main differences between the first two is whether or not any extra fat can be added. Both are made from leftover trimmings of various cuts, even high quality ones like prime rib. (With ground beef, no extra fat can be added. With hamburger, so long as the ''total'' fat does not exceed 30%, extra fat can be added from any cut.) With ground [whatever cut], all the lean and fat ''must'' [[ShapedLikeItself come from the specified cut]]. And then you get into "lean" and "extra lean" ground beef, which is about the ratio of fat to actual meat. That can be a trade-off; lean and extra-lean ground beef are lower in fat and cholesterol (which can be appealing to health-conscious consumers, but somewhat less flavorful than their "regular" counterparts.


** Extract the same chemical from wood as a byproduct of paper making -- less sexy, but fairly effective; or

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** Extract the same chemical from wood as a byproduct of paper making -- less sexy, but fairly effective; effective;[[note]]Wood is usually pretty rich in vanillin; the vanilla and similar notes in [[SommelierSpeak fine wines and spirits]] aged in barrels derive from wood vanillin[[/note]] or


* Pet-safe chocolate treats, which are actually made of carob since chocolate is toxic to most animals, are often labelled "choc" flavor.

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* Pet-safe chocolate treats, which are actually made of carob since chocolate is toxic to most animals, are often labelled "choc" flavor.as "choc", especially in the UK.

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* Pet-safe chocolate treats, which are actually made of carob since chocolate is toxic to most animals, are often labelled "choc" flavor.


* When General Mills revived Fruit Brute cereal in Fall 2013, they had to change the name to Fr'''ute''' Brute, since none of their monster cereals contain real fruit.

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* When General Mills revived [[Advertising/MonsterCereals Fruit Brute Brute]] cereal in Fall 2013, they had to change the name to Fr'''ute''' Brute, since none of their monster cereals contain real fruit.

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