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* During the late 90s and the 2000s, Internet media was dominated by Flash, which was considered to be lightweight enough for most computers (especially in the days of dial-up lines) and intuitive enough for programmers. In fact, when the [=iPhone=] launched with no Flash support, many expected that Android would trounce the [=iOS=] system. However, it turned out that Flash had serious performance issues on mobile devices, which forced many websites to create "mobile versions" with [=HTML5=]. The rapidly increasing use of smartphones and tablets during the early 2010s clearly established [=HTML5=] as the new industry standard, and by the second half of the decade, desktop browsers began dropping Flash, which will be discontinued by Adobe in 2020.


The result? ''The Draco'', an utterly nonsensical story about Nightcrawler being a demon and a conspiracy to appoint him Pope. An arc that served as a bizarre retelling of Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet that featured a midair public sex scene. Juggernaut turning good and banging ComicBook/SheHulk for no reason. The introduction of CreatorsPet Annie Ghazikhanian ([[{{Tuckerization}} based off his wife]] Ann Austen, more known as a writer for ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' than anything else). Austen also had short runs on many other famous books, from ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' to ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'', each time being chased off by increasingly irritated fans. He eventually jumped ship to DC, who handed him ''Action Comics'', at which he proceeded to write a DerailingLoveInterests plot that pleased neither Lois fans nor Lana fans. It would be his last mainstream work, and he's since gone back to TV animation (which he'd been [[WesternAnimationa/TrippingTheRift doing]] before going into comics; strangely, perhaps because of him not writing them, the shows he's worked on [[WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse have]] [[WesternAnimation/PennZeroPartTimeHero been]] [[WesternAnimation/SheRaAndThePrincessesOfPower successful]]) under the name ''Chuckles'' Austen. Chris Sims [[http://comicsalliance.com/ask-chris-89-the-rise-and-fall-of-chuck-austen/ summed him up]] thusly:

to:

The result? ''The Draco'', an utterly nonsensical story about Nightcrawler being a demon and a conspiracy to appoint him Pope. An arc that served as a bizarre retelling of Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet that featured a midair public sex scene. Juggernaut turning good and banging ComicBook/SheHulk for no reason. The introduction of CreatorsPet Annie Ghazikhanian ([[{{Tuckerization}} based off his wife]] Ann Austen, more known as a writer for ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' than anything else). Austen also had short runs on many other famous books, from ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' to ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'', each time being chased off by increasingly irritated fans. He eventually jumped ship to DC, who handed him ''Action Comics'', at which he proceeded to write a DerailingLoveInterests plot that pleased neither Lois fans nor Lana fans. It would be his last mainstream work, and he's since gone back to TV animation (which he'd been [[WesternAnimationa/TrippingTheRift [[WesternAnimation/TrippingTheRift doing]] before going into comics; strangely, perhaps because of him not writing them, the shows he's worked on [[WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse have]] [[WesternAnimation/PennZeroPartTimeHero been]] [[WesternAnimation/SheRaAndThePrincessesOfPower successful]]) under the name ''Chuckles'' Austen. Chris Sims [[http://comicsalliance.com/ask-chris-89-the-rise-and-fall-of-chuck-austen/ summed him up]] thusly:


The result? ''The Draco'', an utterly nonsensical story about Nightcrawler being a demon and a conspiracy to appoint him Pope. An arc that served as a bizarre retelling of Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet that featured a midair public sex scene. Juggernaut turning good and banging ComicBook/SheHulk for no reason. The introduction of CreatorsPet Annie Ghazikhanian ([[{{Tuckerization}} based off his wife]] Ann Austen, more known as a writer for ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' than anything else). Austen also had short runs on many other famous books, from ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' to ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'', each time being chased off by increasingly irritated fans. He eventually jumped ship to DC, who handed him ''Action Comics'', at which he proceeded to write a DerailingLoveInterests plot that pleased neither Lois fans nor Lana fans. It would be his last mainstream work, and he's since gone back to TV animation (which he'd been doing before going into comics; strangely, perhaps because of him not writing them, [[WesternAnimation/TrippingTheRift the shows]] [[WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse he's worked]] [[WesternAnimation/PennZeroPartTimeHero on have]] [[WesternAnimation/SheRaAndThePrincessesOfPower been successful]]) under the name ''Chuckles'' Austen. Chris Sims [[http://comicsalliance.com/ask-chris-89-the-rise-and-fall-of-chuck-austen/ summed him up]] thusly:

to:

The result? ''The Draco'', an utterly nonsensical story about Nightcrawler being a demon and a conspiracy to appoint him Pope. An arc that served as a bizarre retelling of Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet that featured a midair public sex scene. Juggernaut turning good and banging ComicBook/SheHulk for no reason. The introduction of CreatorsPet Annie Ghazikhanian ([[{{Tuckerization}} based off his wife]] Ann Austen, more known as a writer for ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' than anything else). Austen also had short runs on many other famous books, from ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' to ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'', each time being chased off by increasingly irritated fans. He eventually jumped ship to DC, who handed him ''Action Comics'', at which he proceeded to write a DerailingLoveInterests plot that pleased neither Lois fans nor Lana fans. It would be his last mainstream work, and he's since gone back to TV animation (which he'd been doing [[WesternAnimationa/TrippingTheRift doing]] before going into comics; strangely, perhaps because of him not writing them, [[WesternAnimation/TrippingTheRift the shows]] shows he's worked on [[WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse he's worked]] have]] [[WesternAnimation/PennZeroPartTimeHero on have]] been]] [[WesternAnimation/SheRaAndThePrincessesOfPower been successful]]) under the name ''Chuckles'' Austen. Chris Sims [[http://comicsalliance.com/ask-chris-89-the-rise-and-fall-of-chuck-austen/ summed him up]] thusly:


The result? ''The Draco'', an utterly nonsensical story about Nightcrawler being a demon and a conspiracy to appoint him Pope. An arc that served as a bizarre retelling of Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet that featured a midair public sex scene. Juggernaut turning good and banging ComicBook/SheHulk for no reason. The introduction of CreatorsPet Annie Ghazikhanian ([[{{Tuckerization}} based off his wife]] Ann Austen, more known as a writer for ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' than anything else). Austen also had short runs on many other famous books, from ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' to ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'', each time being chased off by increasingly irritated fans. He eventually jumped ship to DC, who handed him ''Action Comics'', at which he proceeded to write a DerailingLoveInterests plot that pleased neither Lois fans nor Lana fans. It would be his last mainstream work, and he's since gone back to TV animation (which he'd been doing before going into comics; strangely, perhaps because of him not writing them, [[WesternAnimation/TrippingTheRift the shows]] [[WesternAnimation/StevenUniversehe's worked]] [[WesternAnimation/PennZeroPartTimeHero on have]] [[WesternAnimation/SheRaAndThePrincessesOfPower been successful]]) under the name ''Chuckles'' Austen. Chris Sims [[http://comicsalliance.com/ask-chris-89-the-rise-and-fall-of-chuck-austen/ summed him up]] thusly:

to:

The result? ''The Draco'', an utterly nonsensical story about Nightcrawler being a demon and a conspiracy to appoint him Pope. An arc that served as a bizarre retelling of Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet that featured a midair public sex scene. Juggernaut turning good and banging ComicBook/SheHulk for no reason. The introduction of CreatorsPet Annie Ghazikhanian ([[{{Tuckerization}} based off his wife]] Ann Austen, more known as a writer for ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' than anything else). Austen also had short runs on many other famous books, from ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' to ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'', each time being chased off by increasingly irritated fans. He eventually jumped ship to DC, who handed him ''Action Comics'', at which he proceeded to write a DerailingLoveInterests plot that pleased neither Lois fans nor Lana fans. It would be his last mainstream work, and he's since gone back to TV animation (which he'd been doing before going into comics; strangely, perhaps because of him not writing them, [[WesternAnimation/TrippingTheRift the shows]] [[WesternAnimation/StevenUniversehe's [[WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse he's worked]] [[WesternAnimation/PennZeroPartTimeHero on have]] [[WesternAnimation/SheRaAndThePrincessesOfPower been successful]]) under the name ''Chuckles'' Austen. Chris Sims [[http://comicsalliance.com/ask-chris-89-the-rise-and-fall-of-chuck-austen/ summed him up]] thusly:


The result? ''The Draco'', an utterly nonsensical story about Nightcrawler being a demon and a conspiracy to appoint him Pope. An arc that served as a bizarre retelling of Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet that featured a midair public sex scene. Juggernaut turning good and banging ComicBook/SheHulk for no reason. The introduction of CreatorsPet Annie Ghazikhanian ([[{{Tuckerization}} based off his wife]] Ann Austen, more known as a writer for ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' than anything else). Austen also had short runs on many other famous books, from ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' to ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'', each time being chased off by increasingly irritated fans. He eventually jumped ship to DC, who handed him ''Action Comics'', at which he proceeded to write a DerailingLoveInterests plot that pleased neither Lois fans nor Lana fans. It would be his last mainstream work, and he's since gone back to TV animation (which he'd been doing before going into comics; strangely, perhaps because of him not writing them, the shows he's worked on have been successful) under the name ''Chuckles'' Austen. Chris Sims [[http://comicsalliance.com/ask-chris-89-the-rise-and-fall-of-chuck-austen/ summed him up]] thusly:

to:

The result? ''The Draco'', an utterly nonsensical story about Nightcrawler being a demon and a conspiracy to appoint him Pope. An arc that served as a bizarre retelling of Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet that featured a midair public sex scene. Juggernaut turning good and banging ComicBook/SheHulk for no reason. The introduction of CreatorsPet Annie Ghazikhanian ([[{{Tuckerization}} based off his wife]] Ann Austen, more known as a writer for ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' than anything else). Austen also had short runs on many other famous books, from ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' to ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'', each time being chased off by increasingly irritated fans. He eventually jumped ship to DC, who handed him ''Action Comics'', at which he proceeded to write a DerailingLoveInterests plot that pleased neither Lois fans nor Lana fans. It would be his last mainstream work, and he's since gone back to TV animation (which he'd been doing before going into comics; strangely, perhaps because of him not writing them, [[WesternAnimation/TrippingTheRift the shows he's worked shows]] [[WesternAnimation/StevenUniversehe's worked]] [[WesternAnimation/PennZeroPartTimeHero on have have]] [[WesternAnimation/SheRaAndThePrincessesOfPower been successful) successful]]) under the name ''Chuckles'' Austen. Chris Sims [[http://comicsalliance.com/ask-chris-89-the-rise-and-fall-of-chuck-austen/ summed him up]] thusly:


* During the late 90s and the 2000s, Internet media was dominated by Flash, which was considered to be lightweight enough for most computers (especially in the days of dial-up lines) and intuitive enough for programmers. In fact, when the [=iPhone=] launched with no Flash support, many expected that Android would trounce the [=iOS=] system. However, it turned out that Flash had serious performance issues on mobile devices, which forced many websites to create "mobile versions" with HTML5. The rapidly increasing use of smartphones and tablets during the early 2010s clearly established HTML5 as the new industry standard, and by the second half of the decade, desktop browsers began dropping Flash, which will be discontinued by Adobe in 2020.

to:

* During the late 90s and the 2000s, Internet media was dominated by Flash, which was considered to be lightweight enough for most computers (especially in the days of dial-up lines) and intuitive enough for programmers. In fact, when the [=iPhone=] launched with no Flash support, many expected that Android would trounce the [=iOS=] system. However, it turned out that Flash had serious performance issues on mobile devices, which forced many websites to create "mobile versions" with HTML5. [=HTML5=]. The rapidly increasing use of smartphones and tablets during the early 2010s clearly established HTML5 [=HTML5=] as the new industry standard, and by the second half of the decade, desktop browsers began dropping Flash, which will be discontinued by Adobe in 2020.


* Creator/RobLiefeld, while never a critical favourite, [[CriticalDissonance was nevertheless considered one of the most successful writers/artists]] during UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. He created several famous characters, such as ComicBook/{{Deadpool}} and ComicBook/{{Cable}}. He also helped start Creator/ImageComics and was influential through his work on ''Comicbook/YoungBlood''. However, after the Dark Age ended, he became a laughingstock for being a LazyArtist (not drawing feet, creating unrealistic and generic character designs, not caring about perspective or how the human body works, and overusing pouches), and for plagiarizing concepts form other people (for example, Deadpool started off as an {{Expy}} of {{ComicBook/Deathstroke}}). Today ''Youngblood'' is usually seen as SoBadItsGood (though the later revivals of the series in 1998, 2008 and 2012 were better received) and even Liefeld himself considers the first few issues of the series to be an OldShame (though many have praised the ''Youngblood'' trade paperback for fixing many of the problems the original issues had) which is generally considered a poor rip-off of the ''Comicbook/TeenTitans'', and Image has moved away from superhero comics like it. Cable and Deadpool are still popular, but that's [[MyRealDaddy thanks to other writers]] who developed them in different ways than Liefeld and are generally considered their ''true'' creators by fans. What little goodwill Liefeld still had by the 2000s dried up after a much-publicized feud with Creator/PeterDavid after the latter revealed that the character Shatterstar, who had been created by Liefeld for ''ComicBook/XForce'' and was at the time being used by David in ''ComicBook/XFactor'', was bisexual. This move was very well-received by fans (and given Shatterstar's origins, seems fairly obvious in hindsight), but Liefeld was incensed that the move had been made without consulting him and many felt his comments on the subject were worryingly close to biphobic (though WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall's numerous reviews of his comics didn't help). Nowadays, the only times you hear about Liefeld is mockery of his art-style or his lackluster characters, and comic book fans consider him to be the ultimate embodiment of everything wrong with The Dark Age Of Comics.

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* Creator/RobLiefeld, while never a critical favourite, [[CriticalDissonance was nevertheless considered one of the most successful writers/artists]] during UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. He created several famous characters, such as ComicBook/{{Deadpool}} and ComicBook/{{Cable}}. He also helped start Creator/ImageComics and was influential through his work on ''Comicbook/YoungBlood''. ''Comicbook/{{Youngblood}}''. However, after the Dark Age ended, he became a laughingstock for being a LazyArtist (not drawing feet, creating unrealistic and generic character designs, not caring about perspective or how the human body works, and overusing pouches), and for plagiarizing concepts form from other people (for example, Deadpool started off as an {{Expy}} of {{ComicBook/Deathstroke}}). Today ''Youngblood'' is usually seen as SoBadItsGood (though the later revivals of the series in 1998, 2008 and 2012 were better received) and even Liefeld himself considers the first few issues of the series to be an OldShame (though many have praised the ''Youngblood'' trade paperback for fixing many of the problems the original issues had) which is generally considered a poor rip-off of the ''Comicbook/TeenTitans'', and Image has moved away from superhero comics like it. Cable and Deadpool are still popular, but that's [[MyRealDaddy thanks to other writers]] who developed them in different ways than Liefeld and are generally considered their ''true'' creators by fans. What little goodwill Liefeld still had by the 2000s dried up after a much-publicized feud with Creator/PeterDavid after the latter revealed that the character Shatterstar, who had been created by Liefeld for ''ComicBook/XForce'' and was at the time being used by David in ''ComicBook/XFactor'', was bisexual. This move was very well-received by fans (and given Shatterstar's origins, seems fairly obvious in hindsight), but Liefeld was incensed that the move had been made without consulting him and many felt his comments on the subject were worryingly close to biphobic (though WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall's numerous reviews of his comics didn't help). Nowadays, the only times you hear about Liefeld is mockery of his art-style or his lackluster characters, and comic book fans consider him to be the ultimate embodiment of everything wrong with The Dark Age Of Comics.


* The JiggleShow. Starting in TheSeventies, there was a surge in the popularity of shows like ''Series/ThreesCompany'', ''Series/CharliesAngels'', and to a lesser extent the ''Series/WonderWoman'' series and ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'', which were long on beautiful actresses who [[{{Gainaxing}} didn't wear bras]] but generally seen as a little short on plot. Even at the time, they were seen as GuiltyPleasures, the joke being that their fanbases were made up mostly of sexually frustrated men who would be willing to [[JustHereForGodzilla sit through thirty minutes of flimsy dialogue]] for the chance to see Suzanne Somers in [[BeachEpisode a bikini]] or Farrah Fawcett run after a bad guy in a [[SweaterGirl tight sweater]]. The genre received a second wind in TheNineties with ''Series/{{Baywatch}}'' and its assorted copycats, but with the rise of [[TheInternetIsForPorn easily accessible pornography on the internet]] and more liberal views towards sexual matters, shows that once expected to coast solely on the beauty of their casts increasingly found themselves disappointed, especially once more 'respectable' programs began showing more [[{{Fanservice}} sexually provocative content]] up to and including (on the premium cable networks) full-on nudity. This was best demonstrated in 2011, when ''Series/ThePlayboyClub'' and a {{revival}} of ''Charlie's Angels'' both got canned after only a few poorly-rated episodes and scathing reviews. Today, the era of "jiggle television" is remembered as fairly quaint and embarrassing, a relic of the days when television had just learned it could start pushing boundaries but not yet really knowing what to do with its newfound freedom.

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* The JiggleShow. Starting in TheSeventies, there was a surge in the popularity of shows like ''Series/ThreesCompany'', ''Series/CharliesAngels'', and to a lesser extent the ''Series/WonderWoman'' series and ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'', which were long on beautiful actresses who [[{{Gainaxing}} didn't wear bras]] but generally seen as a little short on plot. Even at the time, they were seen as GuiltyPleasures, the joke being that their fanbases were made up mostly of sexually frustrated sexually-frustrated men who would be willing to [[JustHereForGodzilla sit through thirty minutes of flimsy dialogue]] for the chance to see Suzanne Somers in [[BeachEpisode a bikini]] or Farrah Fawcett run after a bad guy in a [[SweaterGirl tight sweater]]. The genre A glut of bad shows and a backlash against the decade's overt sexuality in the 80s buried the genre, which then received a second wind in TheNineties with ''Series/{{Baywatch}}'' and its assorted copycats, but while during the 2000s, it was joked that every show on the Fox network that wasn't ''24'', ''American Idol'', a procedural, or an animated sitcom was basically this. However, this second boom coincided with the rise of [[TheInternetIsForPorn easily accessible pornography on the internet]] and more liberal views towards sexual matters, matters. As a result, shows that once expected to coast solely on the beauty of their casts increasingly found themselves disappointed, especially once as more 'respectable' programs began showing more [[{{Fanservice}} sexually provocative sexually-provocative content]] up to and including (on the premium cable networks) full-on nudity. This was best demonstrated in 2011, when ''Series/ThePlayboyClub'' and a {{revival}} of ''Charlie's Angels'' both got canned after only a few poorly-rated episodes and scathing reviews. Changing views on sexuality and the [=#MeToo=] movement during the 2010s would also give the genre a reputation for sexism. Today, the era of "jiggle television" is remembered as fairly quaint and embarrassing, a relic of the days when television had just learned it could start pushing boundaries but not yet really knowing what to do with its newfound freedom.



However, sales for the brand started to tumble beginning in 2006 during the oil crisis (they were notorious for guzzling gas even at the height of their popularity[[note]]Even the "compact" H3 model got 14 mpg in city driving and 18 on the highway, while the H2 scored a miserable 10 city / 13 highway[[/note]]), and hit a nosedive once the financial crisis and subsequent recession hit in 2007-08. Production was halted when GM declared bankruptcy in June of 2009, and after the company emerged from bankruptcy a month later attempts were made to re-brand the Hummer as a more eco-friendly vehicle with a smaller hybrid electric/gas version, which didn't get very far. After GM's attempt to sell the brand to the Sichuan Tengzhong Automobile company in China failed, they completely discontinued the Hummer brand in late 2009. Today, the brand is remembered as a poster child for the excesses of TurnOfTheMillennium consumerism, and not many people will admit to having owned one. Only the original H1 model still gets any respect nowadays, and even that comes almost entirely from off-road enthusiasts, while its H2 and H3 siblings are seen as pure style-over-substance road boats that were basically {{nerf}}ed versions of the H1, cheapening the brand and giving it its current reputation. William Clavey of ''Jalopnik'', looking back on the H2 years later, [[http://jalopnik.com/the-hummer-h2-is-a-grand-and-opulent-bad-idea-1796613645 described it]] as "an automotive equivalent to the phrase 'we’ve gone too far.'"

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However, sales for the brand started to tumble beginning in 2006 during as a result of the oil crisis (they were notorious for guzzling gas even at the height of their popularity[[note]]Even the "compact" H3 model got 14 mpg in city driving and 18 on the highway, while the H2 scored a miserable 10 city / 13 highway[[/note]]), and hit a nosedive once the financial crisis and subsequent recession hit in 2007-08. Production was halted when GM declared bankruptcy in June of 2009, and after the company emerged from bankruptcy a month later attempts were made to re-brand the Hummer as a more eco-friendly vehicle with a smaller hybrid electric/gas version, which didn't get very far. After GM's attempt to sell the brand to the Sichuan Tengzhong Automobile company in China failed, they completely discontinued the Hummer brand in late 2009. Today, the brand is remembered as a poster child for the excesses of TurnOfTheMillennium consumerism, and not many people will admit to having owned one. Only the original H1 model still gets any respect nowadays, and even that comes almost entirely from off-road enthusiasts, while its H2 and H3 siblings are seen as pure style-over-substance road boats that were basically {{nerf}}ed versions of the H1, cheapening the brand and giving it its current reputation. William Clavey of ''Jalopnik'', looking back on the H2 years later, [[http://jalopnik.com/the-hummer-h2-is-a-grand-and-opulent-bad-idea-1796613645 described it]] as "an automotive equivalent to the phrase 'we’ve gone too far.'"



However, those same excesses became the downfall of club culture by the final years of the decade, which became regarded as ludicrously out-of-touch in an era of economic meltdown, and a new generation of actors, models, and musicians would see the consequences of all that indulgence and stay away. Lohan, whose antics at clubs became legendary, saw her once-promising movie career ruined by her constant partying as it became [[NeverLiveItDown the only thing people knew her for]], while Hilton's reputation for being [[FamousForBeingFamous "famous for doing nothing"]] and the reveal of [[RichBitch her racist and homophobic views]] only alienated her to a younger and more progressive generation. The rise of social media and smartphones also contributed to the scene's fall; not only did it make the cameras inescapable and ensure that indiscretions were impossible to sweep under the rug, but a celebrity no longer have to be seen at a certain location in order to be considered socially active. Night clubs are still around, but are now seen as unpleasant. They've been mocked for being shallow for denying entrance based on appearances (including wearing the "wrong" clothes), and overly long lines that keep people waiting for hours just to go inside. Today's youth see those things as bad service instead of "part of the experience" as previous generations did, leading to a massive closure of night clubs. These days, few people will admit to becoming so embroiled in the club scene.

to:

However, those same excesses became the downfall of club culture by the final years of the decade, which became regarded as ludicrously out-of-touch in an era of economic meltdown, and a new generation of actors, models, and musicians would see the consequences of all that indulgence and stay away. Lohan, whose antics at clubs became legendary, saw her once-promising movie career ruined by her constant partying as it became [[NeverLiveItDown the only thing people knew her for]], while Hilton's reputation for being [[FamousForBeingFamous "famous for doing nothing"]] and the reveal of [[RichBitch her racist and homophobic views]] only alienated her to a younger and more progressive generation.generation, while younger women considered [[TheLadette that behaving like a "frat boy" and dressing like a stripper]] was quite sexist. The rise of social media and smartphones also contributed to the scene's fall; not only did it make the cameras inescapable and ensure that indiscretions were impossible to sweep under the rug, but a celebrity no longer have to be seen at a certain location in order to be considered socially active. Night clubs are still around, but are now seen as unpleasant. They've been mocked for being shallow for denying entrance based on appearances (including wearing the "wrong" clothes), and overly long lines that keep people waiting for hours just to go inside. Today's youth see those things as bad service instead of "part of the experience" as previous generations did, leading to a massive closure of night clubs. These days, few people will admit to becoming so embroiled in the club scene.


* Excessive artificial tanning (be it from spraying or using a bed) has gone out this way. Tanning was very popular, and it was especially huge in the 2000s when spray tanning was massively popular with celebrities to achieve that sun-kissed glow. However, some took the practice [[http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3474768/The-WORST-fake-tan-fails-time-revealed-avoid-them.html too far]], resulting in no shortage of mockery. Moreover, thanks in part to an increased awareness of skin cancer and a resurgence of heavy makeup in the 2010s, tans are no longer seen as a prerequisite for beauty, as the popularity of paler skinned celebrities like Creator/ChristinaHendricks, Creator/RobertPattinson, Creator/BenedictCumberbatch, Dita Von Teese, and Music/KatyPerry has shown. As demonstrated by the also DTD ''Series/JerseyShore'' (and others), excessive tanning is now far more likely to be mocked than swooned over (as exemplified with [[http://www.revelist.com/politics/donald-trumps-fake-ass-tan/766 Donald Trump]]). The Kardashians, who continue to artificially bronze themselves, and their imitators, once had thousands who followed in their footsteps of tanning are now mocked for one of the same reasons that got them so big.
* The leisure suit became popular from the 1960s through the '70s when the abundance of synthetic materials, cheap prices, and a dislike for formality made it the fashion symbol for men. Its height of popularity was during the '70s when it was frequently associated with disco culture. But when disco, well, [[TropeNamers became dead]], the leisure suit went with it -- and by the '80s, it was commonly considered emblematic of '70s kitsch. Today, it is little known for anything other than clueless fashion sense, such as the ''VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry'' video game series.

to:

* Excessive artificial tanning (be it from spraying or using a bed) has gone out this way. Tanning was had been very popular, popular in the late 60s and 70s as well as the late 90s, and it was especially huge in the 2000s when spray tanning was massively popular with celebrities to achieve that sun-kissed glow. However, some took the practice [[http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3474768/The-WORST-fake-tan-fails-time-revealed-avoid-them.html too far]], resulting in no shortage of mockery. Moreover, thanks in part to an increased awareness of skin cancer and a resurgence of heavy makeup in the 2010s, tans are no longer seen as a prerequisite for beauty, as the popularity of paler skinned celebrities like Creator/ChristinaHendricks, Creator/RobertPattinson, Creator/BenedictCumberbatch, Dita Von Teese, and Music/KatyPerry has shown. As demonstrated by the also DTD ''Series/JerseyShore'' (and others), excessive tanning is now far more likely to be mocked than swooned over (as exemplified with [[http://www.revelist.com/politics/donald-trumps-fake-ass-tan/766 Donald Trump]]). The Kardashians, who continue to artificially bronze themselves, and their imitators, once had thousands who followed in their footsteps of tanning are now mocked for one of the same reasons that got them so big.
* The leisure suit became popular from the 1960s through the '70s when the abundance of synthetic materials, cheap prices, and a dislike for formality made it the fashion symbol for men. Its height of popularity was during the '70s when it was frequently associated with disco culture. But when disco, well, [[TropeNamers became dead]], the leisure suit went with it -- and by the '80s, it was commonly considered emblematic of '70s kitsch. Today, it is little known for anything other than clueless fashion sense, such as the ''VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry'' video game series.



* The third season ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "[[Recap/StarTrekS3E3TheParadiseSyndrome The Paradise Syndrome]]" was, at the time of its initial airing, hailed as one of the better episodes (arguably even the best) in an otherwise pretty underwhelming season, affording Creator/WilliamShatner the chance to do some of his best acting during the show's run, and also creating the Preservers, an enigmatic, unseen race who would provide huge amounts of both CanonFodder and FanficFuel for the decades ahead. While the episode retained its strong reputation for a while, it ultimately nosedived around the late 1980s and early 1990s, as the problems with its WhiteSavior narrative and stereotypical depictions of Native American peoples -- all played by actors in {{brownface}}, no less -- became glaringly obvious. What's more, the other main reasons for the episode's initial popularity no longer applied, as Shatner had gone on to provide far more iconic performances in the TOS films, and the various fanfics and expanded universe novels made far more effective usage of the Preservers than their fleeting mentions in the episode. As a result, the episode is now generally seen as one of the worst not just of the third season, but of TOS in general.

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* The third season ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "[[Recap/StarTrekS3E3TheParadiseSyndrome The Paradise Syndrome]]" was, at the time of its initial airing, hailed as one of the better episodes (arguably even the best) in an otherwise pretty underwhelming season, affording Creator/WilliamShatner the chance to do some of his best acting during the show's run, and also creating the Preservers, an enigmatic, unseen race who would provide huge amounts of both CanonFodder and FanficFuel for the decades ahead. While the episode retained its strong reputation for a while, it ultimately nosedived around the late 1980s and early 1990s, as Shatner had gone on to provide far more iconic performances in the TOS films, while the problems with its WhiteSavior narrative and stereotypical depictions of Native American peoples -- all played by actors in {{brownface}}, no less -- became glaringly obvious. obvious by the 1990s. What's more, the other main reasons for the episode's initial popularity no longer applied, as Shatner had gone on to provide far more iconic performances in the TOS films, and the later years various fanfics and expanded universe novels made far more effective usage of the Preservers than their fleeting mentions in the episode. As a result, the episode is now generally seen as one of the worst not just of the third season, but of TOS in general.



* Website/MySpace was ''the'' social media platform in the 2000s, boasting over 60 million users at the height of its popularity and helping to catapult numerous musicians (most notably from the {{emo|Music}} genre) into the mainstream. However, due to the rise of competing social media sites (especially Website/{{Facebook}}) over the years, around 2008-09 the site began hemorrhaging users as they moved on to other platforms. After founder and unofficial "mascot" Tom Anderson was fired, the site went through a change in management in 2010, attempting to rebrand itself as a "Social Entertainment" site. The site tried repeatedly to reinvent itself and attract back users, but [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks most of the changes were poorly received]] by the few users still sticking around (mostly roleplayers, who would end up also leaving [=MySpace=] for other blogging platforms like Website/LiveJournal and Website/{{Tumblr}}) and often reeked of WereStillRelevantDammit-type desperation. After being bought and sold to a revolving door of companies and individuals, the site was {{retool}}ed into a virtual Facebook copy, while also deleting all the existing blogs, comments, and messages (or at least making them inaccessible) without ''any'' prior warning whatsoever, which did not amuse the remaining fanbase.\\\
[=MySpace=] is still around as a social networking site, albeit now with a heavier emphasis on music and entertainment. However, between the existence of Facebook ([[DefeatMeansFriendship with Tom himself even stating that he much preferred it]]) and other competing platforms, [=MySpace=]'s GloryDays are nothing more than a distant memory for many '00s kids, and it's not likely to recapture any of that any day soon, being considered the Internet equivalent to a DyingTown. Anytime [=MySpace=] is ever talked about nowadays, it's often to laugh about how it seemed to be a breeding ground for {{Emo Teen}}s, {{Attention Whore}}s, and [[PaedoHunt pedophiles]]. The final nail in the coffin occurred when a data purge removed almost everything uploaded between 2005 and 2016, including upwards of 60 million [=MP3=] files. Even if people wanted to check their old [=MySpace=] page, they can't now.

to:

* Website/MySpace was ''the'' social media platform in the 2000s, boasting over 60 million users at the height of its popularity and helping to catapult numerous musicians (most notably from the {{emo|Music}} genre) into the mainstream. However, due to the rise of competing social media sites (especially Website/{{Facebook}}) over that generally had more intuitive format than the years, rather complex [=MySpace=], around 2008-09 the site began hemorrhaging users as they moved on to other platforms. After founder and unofficial "mascot" Tom Anderson was fired, the site went through a change in management in 2010, attempting to rebrand itself as a "Social Entertainment" site. The site tried repeatedly to reinvent itself and attract back users, but [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks most of the changes were poorly received]] by the few users still sticking around (mostly roleplayers, who would end up also leaving [=MySpace=] for other blogging platforms like Website/LiveJournal and Website/{{Tumblr}}) and often reeked of WereStillRelevantDammit-type desperation. After being bought and sold to a revolving door of companies and individuals, the site was {{retool}}ed into a virtual Facebook copy, while also deleting all the existing blogs, comments, and messages (or at least making them inaccessible) without ''any'' prior warning whatsoever, which did not amuse the remaining fanbase.\\\
[=MySpace=] is still around as a social networking site, albeit now with a heavier emphasis on music and entertainment. However, between the existence of Facebook ([[DefeatMeansFriendship with Tom himself even stating that he much preferred it]]) and other competing platforms, [=MySpace=]'s GloryDays are nothing more than a distant memory for many '00s kids, and it's not likely to recapture any of that any day soon, being it soon became considered the Internet equivalent to a DyingTown. Anytime [=MySpace=] is ever talked about nowadays, it's often to laugh about how it seemed to be a breeding ground for {{Emo Teen}}s, {{Attention Whore}}s, and [[PaedoHunt pedophiles]]. The final nail in the coffin occurred when a data purge removed almost everything uploaded between 2005 and 2016, including upwards of 60 million [=MP3=] files. Even if people wanted to check their old [=MySpace=] page, they can't now.
* During the late 90s and the 2000s, Internet media was dominated by Flash, which was considered to be lightweight enough for most computers (especially in the days of dial-up lines) and intuitive enough for programmers. In fact, when the [=iPhone=] launched with no Flash support, many expected that Android would trounce the [=iOS=] system. However, it turned out that Flash had serious performance issues on mobile devices, which forced many websites to create "mobile versions" with HTML5. The rapidly increasing use of smartphones and tablets during the early 2010s clearly established HTML5 as the new industry standard, and by the second half of the decade, desktop browsers began dropping Flash, which will be discontinued by Adobe in 2020.



* MinstrelShows were some of the most popular forms of entertainment in the 19th and early 20th centuries, being viewed as good, clean, light comedy. They were also very culturally significant as one of the first uniquely American forms of artistic expression. As times changed, however, the nasty racial undertones that lay at the core of the genre fundamentally discredited it. The practice of {{blackface}} -- using heavy makeup on a white actor so they can play a caricature of black stereotypes -- is a particular source of OldShame. Today, it is only used in period works as either DeliberateValuesDissonance or shock comedy. A notable turning point was in ''Film/WhiteChristmas'', the 1954 remake of sorts of 1942's ''Holiday Inn''. Like ''Holiday Inn'', ''White Christmas'' has a minstrel-show number; unlike ''Holiday Inn'', the performers wear tuxedos, top hats, and gloves, but ''not'' black makeup.

to:

* MinstrelShows were some of the most popular forms of entertainment in the 19th and early 20th centuries, being viewed as good, clean, light comedy. They were also very culturally significant as one of the first uniquely American forms of artistic expression. As times changed, however, the nasty racial undertones that lay at the core of the genre fundamentally discredited it.it after WWII. The practice of {{blackface}} -- using heavy makeup on a white actor so they can play a caricature of black stereotypes -- is a particular source of OldShame. Today, it is only used in period works as either DeliberateValuesDissonance or shock comedy. A notable turning point was in ''Film/WhiteChristmas'', the 1954 remake of sorts of 1942's ''Holiday Inn''. Like ''Holiday Inn'', ''White Christmas'' has a minstrel-show number; unlike ''Holiday Inn'', the performers wear tuxedos, top hats, and gloves, but ''not'' black makeup.



However, sales for the brand started to plummet in the summer of 2008 during the oil crisis (they were notorious for guzzling gas even at the height of their popularity[[note]]Even the "compact" H3 model got 14 mpg in city driving and 18 on the highway, while the H2 scored a miserable 10 city / 13 highway[[/note]]), and stayed low once the financial crisis and subsequent recession hit later that year. Production was halted when GM declared bankruptcy in June of 2009, and after the company emerged from bankruptcy a month later attempts were made to re-brand the Hummer as a more eco-friendly vehicle with a smaller hybrid electric/gas version, which didn't get very far. After GM's attempt to sell the brand to the Sichuan Tengzhong Automobile company in China failed, they completely discontinued the Hummer brand in late 2009. Today, the brand is remembered as a poster child for the excesses of TurnOfTheMillennium consumerism, and not many people will admit to having owned one. Only the original H1 model still gets any respect nowadays, and even that comes almost entirely from off-road enthusiasts, while its H2 and H3 siblings are seen as pure style-over-substance road boats that were basically {{nerf}}ed versions of the H1, cheapening the brand and giving it its current reputation. William Clavey of ''Jalopnik'', looking back on the H2 years later, [[http://jalopnik.com/the-hummer-h2-is-a-grand-and-opulent-bad-idea-1796613645 described it]] as "an automotive equivalent to the phrase 'we’ve gone too far.'"

to:

However, sales for the brand started to plummet tumble beginning in the summer of 2008 2006 during the oil crisis (they were notorious for guzzling gas even at the height of their popularity[[note]]Even the "compact" H3 model got 14 mpg in city driving and 18 on the highway, while the H2 scored a miserable 10 city / 13 highway[[/note]]), and stayed low hit a nosedive once the financial crisis and subsequent recession hit later that year.in 2007-08. Production was halted when GM declared bankruptcy in June of 2009, and after the company emerged from bankruptcy a month later attempts were made to re-brand the Hummer as a more eco-friendly vehicle with a smaller hybrid electric/gas version, which didn't get very far. After GM's attempt to sell the brand to the Sichuan Tengzhong Automobile company in China failed, they completely discontinued the Hummer brand in late 2009. Today, the brand is remembered as a poster child for the excesses of TurnOfTheMillennium consumerism, and not many people will admit to having owned one. Only the original H1 model still gets any respect nowadays, and even that comes almost entirely from off-road enthusiasts, while its H2 and H3 siblings are seen as pure style-over-substance road boats that were basically {{nerf}}ed versions of the H1, cheapening the brand and giving it its current reputation. William Clavey of ''Jalopnik'', looking back on the H2 years later, [[http://jalopnik.com/the-hummer-h2-is-a-grand-and-opulent-bad-idea-1796613645 described it]] as "an automotive equivalent to the phrase 'we’ve gone too far.'"



* The Hollywood young club scene of the TurnOfTheMillennium disappeared with the advent of TheNewTens. There was once a time when you couldn't go a week without hearing about the wild partying of young celebrities like Creator/ParisHilton, Creator/LindsayLohan, and Nicole Richie. It was all but mandatory to be seen at a club in order to be relevant in the tabloids (both the older newspapers and magazines and the new crop of websites like TMZ and Perez Hilton), and [[InDaClub music about the club]] was a mainstay on the pop charts. Even back then, [[SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll the excess of drugs, petty feuds, and partying]] until sunrise was seen as self-indulgent, but it was accepted as just a part of the celebrity lifestyle.\\\
However, those same excesses became the downfall of club culture, as a new generation of actors, models, and musicians would see the consequences of all that indulgence and stay away. Lohan, whose antics at clubs became legendary, saw her once-promising movie career ruined by her constant partying as it became [[NeverLiveItDown the only thing people knew her for]], while Hilton's reputation for being [[FamousForBeingFamous "famous for doing nothing"]] and the reveal of [[RichBitch her racist and homophobic views]] only alienated her to a younger and more progressive generation. The rise of social media and smartphones also contributed to the scene's fall; not only did it make the cameras inescapable and ensure that indiscretions were impossible to sweep under the rug, but a celebrity no longer have to be seen at a certain location in order to be considered socially active. Night clubs are still around, but are now seen as unpleasant. They've been mocked for being shallow for denying entrance based on appearances (including wearing the "wrong" clothes), and overly long lines that keep people waiting for hours just to go inside. Today's youth see those things as bad service instead of "part of the experience" as previous generations did, leading to a massive closure of night clubs. These days, few people will admit to becoming so embroiled in the club scene.

to:

* The Hollywood young club scene of the TurnOfTheMillennium (an offshoot of the Londoner club scene of the mid-to-late 1990s) disappeared with the advent of TheNewTens. There was once a time when you couldn't go a week without hearing about the wild partying of young celebrities like Creator/ParisHilton, Creator/LindsayLohan, and Nicole Richie. It was all but mandatory to be seen at a club in order to be relevant in the tabloids (both the older newspapers and magazines and the new crop of websites like TMZ and Perez Hilton), and [[InDaClub music about the club]] was a mainstay on the pop charts. Even back then, [[SexDrugsAndRockAndRoll the excess of drugs, petty feuds, and partying]] until sunrise was seen as self-indulgent, but it was accepted as just a part of the celebrity lifestyle.\\\
However, those same excesses became the downfall of club culture, culture by the final years of the decade, which became regarded as ludicrously out-of-touch in an era of economic meltdown, and a new generation of actors, models, and musicians would see the consequences of all that indulgence and stay away. Lohan, whose antics at clubs became legendary, saw her once-promising movie career ruined by her constant partying as it became [[NeverLiveItDown the only thing people knew her for]], while Hilton's reputation for being [[FamousForBeingFamous "famous for doing nothing"]] and the reveal of [[RichBitch her racist and homophobic views]] only alienated her to a younger and more progressive generation. The rise of social media and smartphones also contributed to the scene's fall; not only did it make the cameras inescapable and ensure that indiscretions were impossible to sweep under the rug, but a celebrity no longer have to be seen at a certain location in order to be considered socially active. Night clubs are still around, but are now seen as unpleasant. They've been mocked for being shallow for denying entrance based on appearances (including wearing the "wrong" clothes), and overly long lines that keep people waiting for hours just to go inside. Today's youth see those things as bad service instead of "part of the experience" as previous generations did, leading to a massive closure of night clubs. These days, few people will admit to becoming so embroiled in the club scene.


* The "scene" and "emo" subcultures as practiced by many a Website/{{MySpace}}-using EmoTeen are similarly dead in the water. When [=MySpace=] and emo music were big, MoralGuardians around the world took potshots at "emo and scene kids" as the look was ''everywhere'' on the Internet. [[FleetingDemographic Then those teens became young adults and grew out of it.]] The bands at the heart of the subculture have either broken up or moved on, and the genre itself is now [[DeaderThanDisco/{{Music}} buried deeper than disco]] too. [=MySpace=] and other online services that catered to scene/emo kids have either folded or lost users who moved on as well. The whole thing became synonymous with [[{{Wangst}} frequent indulgence of ineffectual angst]], and by TheNewTens, the labels 'emo' and 'scenester' were only being used as insults.

to:

* The "scene" and "emo" subcultures as practiced by many a Website/{{MySpace}}-using EmoTeen are similarly dead in the water. When [=MySpace=] and emo music were big, MoralGuardians around the world took potshots at "emo and scene kids" in full {{You Can Panic Now}} mode as the look was ''everywhere'' on the Internet. [[FleetingDemographic Then those teens became young adults and grew out of it.]] The bands at the heart of the subculture have either broken up or moved on, and the genre itself is now [[DeaderThanDisco/{{Music}} buried deeper than disco]] too. [=MySpace=] and other online services that catered to scene/emo kids have either folded or lost users who moved on as well. The whole thing became synonymous with [[{{Wangst}} frequent indulgence of ineffectual angst]], and by TheNewTens, the labels 'emo' and 'scenester' were only being used as insults.











* An ad for Pringles potato chips actually mentions this trope. When the kid asking a question about the world's largest disco ball, he gets "Dude, disco is dead." as the answer.

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* An ad for Pringles potato chips actually mentions this trope. When the a kid asking asks a question about the world's largest disco ball, he gets "Dude, disco is dead." as the answer.



[[folder:Fanfiction]]
* ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/13315211/8/Double-Back Double Back]]'':
-->'''Sirius:''' I... I died?\\
'''Harry:''' Department of Mysteries, five years from now. Bellatrix caught you off guard and you fell through the Veil.\\
'''Sirius:''' I'm... dead?\\
'''Harry:''' Deader than disco.
[[/folder]]



* In ''Film/DISCO2017'', the reason why Starcrash is resorting to drug-dealing is that Disco as a genre is reaching its lowest in popularity, with every other dance-club in town resorting to drugs and filming pornography to get by.

to:

* In ''Film/DISCO2017'', the reason why Starcrash is resorting to drug-dealing is that Disco disco as a genre is reaching its lowest in popularity, with every other dance-club in town resorting to drugs and filming pornography to get by.




Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Web Original]]
* Creator/NathanRabin uses the term "forgotbuster" to describe this, referring to films that were among the top-grossing hits of the years in which they came out but have gone on to be almost completely forgotten since. On the website ''The Dissolve'', he has done [[https://thedissolve.com/features/forgotbusters/ a series]] on forgotbusters from past and present, exploring why they were hits then but never stood the test of time.
[[/folder]]


Arguments about the company's editing practices came to a head with ''Manga/OnePiece'', which remains the unfortunate darkest mark on their reputation. This dub took the company's (in)famous practices, such as [[{{Bowdlerise}} excessive censorship]], replacing ''all'' the music (capped off with a ThemeTuneRap), [[DubInducedPlotHole skipping over several important episodes]], [[CutAndPasteTranslation remixing elements]] of episodes, drastic changes to the plots, [[CulturalTranslation Americanization]], and low-quality voice acting, and cranked them UpToEleven, all the while showcasing none of their redeeming qualities. To say there was a backlash would be an {{understatement}}. To be fair, while [=4Kids=] wanted nothing to do with the show since they were aware of how un-family friendly it was, Toei Animation forced them to dub it anyway as they would only license other shows to [=4Kids=] as part of a packaged deal. Because of this, that adaptation led to [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes an "allowance" on fansubbers to continue subbing certain series]], as [=4Kids=]' DVD releases rarely, if ever, had any of the original Japanese audio. Also of note, Sanji's voice actor David Moo retired from the anime industry altogether in no small part because of fan ire against him for not only his performance but things that weren't really his fault, and became a Brooklyn-based bartender [[note]]Though since he's co-owner of Quarter Bar, which has been ranked one of the top 18 bars in the US by [[https://bklyner.com/quarter-bar-named-one-esquires-18-best-bars-america-parkslopestoop/ at least one publication,]] it's safe to say he's following his true passion now[[/note]] . Not helping matters is that Moo's only ''other'' notable role, Xellos in ''Anime/{{Slayers}}'', is also extremely polarizing.\\\

to:

Arguments about the company's editing practices came to a head with their dub of ''Manga/OnePiece'', which remains the unfortunate darkest mark on their reputation. This dub took the company's (in)famous practices, such as practices -- [[{{Bowdlerise}} excessive censorship]], replacing ''all'' the music (capped off with a ThemeTuneRap), [[DubInducedPlotHole skipping over several important episodes]], [[CutAndPasteTranslation remixing elements]] of episodes, drastic changes to the plots, [[CulturalTranslation Americanization]], and low-quality voice acting, acting -- and cranked them UpToEleven, UpToEleven. All the while, all the while showcasing things that 4Kids did well were pushed back, leaving them with a program that showcased none of their redeeming qualities. To say there was a backlash would be an {{understatement}}. To be fair, while [=4Kids=] wanted nothing to do with the show since they were aware of how un-family friendly it was, Toei Animation forced them to dub it anyway as they would only license other shows to [=4Kids=] as part of a packaged deal. Because of this, that adaptation led to [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes an "allowance" on fansubbers to continue subbing certain series]], as [=4Kids=]' DVD releases rarely, if ever, had any of the original Japanese audio. Also of note, Sanji's voice actor David Moo retired from the anime industry altogether in no small part because of fan ire against him for not only his performance but things that weren't really his fault, and became a Brooklyn-based bartender [[note]]Though since he's co-owner of Quarter Bar, which has been ranked one of the top 18 bars in the US by [[https://bklyner.com/quarter-bar-named-one-esquires-18-best-bars-america-parkslopestoop/ at least one publication,]] bartender, it's safe to say he's following his true passion now[[/note]] .now. Not helping matters is that Moo's only ''other'' notable role, Xellos in ''Anime/{{Slayers}}'', is also extremely polarizing.\\\


* Carlos Mencia was a hugely popular comedian in the '00s, selling out massive tours and hosting the successful Creator/ComedyCentral show ''Series/MindOfMencia''. The entire time, though, he weathered frequent accusations of UsefulNotes/{{plagiarism}} from all across the comedy world, culminating in an onstage argument with Creator/JoeRogan in 2007 that was [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdugSUFbzws uploaded to YouTube.]] Fans also grew weary of his jokes based around [[SouthOfTheBorder Mexican stereotypes]], especially given that Mencia was not of Mexican descent, but German-Honduran (his birth name was Ned Holness), while ''Mind of Mencia'' came to be seen as a [[ThePoorMansSubstitute poor man's]] ''Series/ChappellesShow''. After ''Mind of Mencia'' was canceled in 2008, Mencia never achieved the same level of fame again, and hasn't released a new special since 2011.

to:

* Carlos Mencia was a hugely popular comedian in the '00s, selling out massive tours and hosting the successful Creator/ComedyCentral show ''Series/MindOfMencia''. The entire time, though, he weathered frequent accusations of UsefulNotes/{{plagiarism}} from all across the comedy world, culminating in an onstage argument with Creator/JoeRogan in 2007 that was [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdugSUFbzws uploaded to YouTube.]] Fans also grew weary of his jokes based around [[SouthOfTheBorder Mexican stereotypes]], especially given that Mencia was not of Mexican descent, but German-Honduran (his birth name was Ned Holness), while ''Mind of Mencia'' came to be seen as a [[ThePoorMansSubstitute poor man's]] ''Series/ChappellesShow''. After ''Mind of Mencia'' was canceled in 2008, Mencia never achieved the same level of fame again, and he hasn't released a new special since 2011. Mencia these days is mostly remembered as a joke thief, a one-note comedian, or both. As such, it's doubtful that Mencia will ever achieve the same level of fame again.


* For a brief time in the mid-'00s, Creator/DaneCook was one of the most popular stand-up comedians in the US, particularly among high school and college students, serving as one of the first entertainers to use social media (Website/MySpace specifically) to build up a huge fanbase. By 2005-06, he had gained over 2 million [=MySpace=] friends, and his CD ''Retaliation'' went double-platinum and became the best-selling comedy album in over thirty years. Then came the severe HypeBacklash from critics who were not amused by his comedic style (consisting primarily of observational humor and telling [[ShaggyDogStory long-winded anecdotes]]), as well as hate coming from ''within'' the stand-up community, with numerous accusations of plagiarism and joke theft (most notably of Creator/LouisCK). As Cook's [[FleetingDemographic fanbase outgrew him]], many joined the ranks of his {{Hatedom}}, until he was seen as the poster child for dumb college humor aimed at audiences that don't know any better. Nowadays, few will admit to having been fans of his.
* Carlos Mencia was a hugely popular comedian in the 00's, selling out massive tours and hosting the successful Comedy Central show ''Series/MindOfMencia''. The entire while though, he weathered frequent accusations of plagiarism from all across the comedy world, culminating with an onstage argument with Joe Rogan that was uploaded to Youtube. Fans also grew weary of his jokes based around Mexican stereotypes, which they felt Mencia didn't have a right to do since he was German-Honduran and not Mexican (his birth name was Ned Holness). After ''Series/MindOfMencia'' was cancelled (which everyone said was a poor man's version of ''Series/ChappellesShow'' anyway), Carlos never achieved the same level of fame again and hasn't released a new special since 2011.

to:

* For a brief time in the mid-'00s, Creator/DaneCook was one of the most popular stand-up comedians in the US, particularly among high school and college students, serving as one of the first entertainers to use social media (Website/MySpace specifically) to build up a huge fanbase. By 2005-06, he had gained over 2 two million [=MySpace=] friends, and his CD ''Retaliation'' went double-platinum and became the best-selling comedy album in over thirty years.years. In 2007, he became the second stand-up comedian in history, after Creator/AndrewDiceClay, to sell out Madison Square Garden. Then came the severe HypeBacklash from critics who were not amused by his comedic style (consisting primarily of observational humor and telling [[ShaggyDogStory long-winded anecdotes]]), as well as hate coming from ''within'' the stand-up community, with numerous accusations of plagiarism and joke theft (most notably of Creator/LouisCK). As Cook's [[FleetingDemographic fanbase outgrew him]], many joined the ranks of his {{Hatedom}}, until he was seen as the poster child for dumb college {{fratbro}} humor aimed at audiences that don't didn't know any better. Nowadays, few will admit to having been fans of his.
* Carlos Mencia was a hugely popular comedian in the 00's, '00s, selling out massive tours and hosting the successful Comedy Central Creator/ComedyCentral show ''Series/MindOfMencia''. The entire while time, though, he weathered frequent accusations of plagiarism UsefulNotes/{{plagiarism}} from all across the comedy world, culminating with in an onstage argument with Joe Rogan Creator/JoeRogan in 2007 that was [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdugSUFbzws uploaded to Youtube. YouTube.]] Fans also grew weary of his jokes based around [[SouthOfTheBorder Mexican stereotypes, which they felt stereotypes]], especially given that Mencia didn't have a right to do since he was not of Mexican descent, but German-Honduran and not Mexican (his birth name was Ned Holness). Holness), while ''Mind of Mencia'' came to be seen as a [[ThePoorMansSubstitute poor man's]] ''Series/ChappellesShow''. After ''Series/MindOfMencia'' ''Mind of Mencia'' was cancelled (which everyone said was a poor man's version of ''Series/ChappellesShow'' anyway), Carlos canceled in 2008, Mencia never achieved the same level of fame again again, and hasn't released a new special since 2011.

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