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* In the ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode where Joe's daughter is born, he borrows money from a loan shark to pay the hospital bill, but when he can't pay back the loan shark, Peter convinces Joe to help him steal from his father in-law, Carter Pewterschmith, who is having a party with his millionaire friends [[ItMakesSenseInContext who will leave a vast fortune stashed in Carter's safe.]] When Peter, Quagmire, and Cleveland make it into the vault, Joe tells Peter to grab the amount needed to pay the loan shark, but Peter decides to grab as much as he can as payback for Carter treating him like crap. Lois manages to tell Joe to not take the money because her father will hunt him down, and put him in prison if he goes through it, Peter is more hesitant, but puts the money back when Macho man Randy Savage yells at him. At the end, Carter doesn't find out about the attempted robbery, and Joe paid back the loan shark with money Lois got from her father. When Peter asks how she convinced him to help Joe, she tells him she lied and said the money was for a divorce lawyer. Peter thinks she's joking, but becomes worried when she silently gets up from the dinner table.

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode where Joe's daughter is born, he borrows money from a loan shark to pay the hospital bill, but when he can't pay back the loan shark, Peter convinces Joe to help him steal from his father in-law, Carter Pewterschmith, who is having a party with his millionaire friends [[ItMakesSenseInContext who will leave a vast fortune stashed in Carter's safe.]] When Peter, Quagmire, and Cleveland make it into the vault, Joe tells Peter to grab the amount needed to pay the loan shark, but Peter decides to grab as much as he can as payback for Carter treating him like crap. Lois manages to tell Joe to not take the money because her father will hunt him down, and put him in prison if he goes through it, Peter is more hesitant, but puts the money back when Macho man Randy Savage Megatron yells at him. At the end, Carter doesn't find out about the attempted robbery, and Joe paid back the loan shark with money Lois got from her father. When Peter asks how she convinced him to help Joe, she tells him she lied and said the money was for a divorce lawyer. Peter thinks she's joking, but becomes worried when she silently gets up from the dinner table.

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* In ''LightNovel/ThereWasNoSecretEvilFightingOrganization'', the chronically bored esper Sago orchestrates fake magical monsters so that similarly bored teenagers can have [[WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld adventures defeating them]]. He acknowledges that he's deluding the kids in all kinds of ways (''they'' don't know their lives aren't really in danger, after all) but justifies it on the basis that [[TheGoldenRule he would want exactly the same thing]] if he were in their position. Even if he did find out the monsters were a sham, the happy memories and friendships he would've forged during the time would've ultimately made it WorthIt.


* The hero in ''Film/IAmAFugitiveFromAChainGang'' is coerced at gunpoint into stealing the money, so as to not lose any sympathy with the audience when he goes through the ordeal at the HellholePrison.

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* The hero in ''Film/IAmAFugitiveFromAChainGang'' is coerced at gunpoint into stealing the money, so as to not lose any sympathy with the audience when he goes through the ordeal at the HellholePrison. (The actual thief is shot dead by police.)


-->-- "A Scandal In Bohemia," ''The Adventures of Literature/SherlockHolmes''

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-->-- "A Scandal In Bohemia," in Bohemia", ''The Adventures of Literature/SherlockHolmes''



Oh yeah! Because they're not just stealing to get rich... they're stealing because they have a ''good reason'' to steal. They are stealing their own property ''back'' from the target, who took it from them in some unjust way. Or the caper is actually [[BigDamnHeroes a rescue attempt]] (or [[RescueTropes some variant thereof]]). Or the target did something bad to the characters to make it a {{revenge}} attempt. Or the target distastefully earned the wealth, and the heroes are [[JustLikeRobinHood targeting]] {{jerkass}}es. Sometimes, the entire point of the caper is espionage or sabotage, which gives the heroic criminals a sort of patriotic "license to steal." Other times, the crew is a Tiger Team, and are breaking into a place to intentionally test its security.

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Oh yeah! Because they're not just stealing to get rich... they're stealing because they have a ''good reason'' to steal. They are stealing their own property ''back'' from the target, who took it from them in some unjust way. Or the caper is actually [[BigDamnHeroes a rescue attempt]] (or [[RescueTropes some variant thereof]]). Or the target did something bad to the characters to make it a {{revenge}} attempt. Or the target distastefully earned the wealth, and the heroes are [[JustLikeRobinHood targeting]] {{jerkass}}es. Sometimes, the entire point of the caper is espionage or sabotage, which gives the heroic criminals a sort of patriotic "license to steal." steal". Other times, the crew is a Tiger Team, and are breaking into a place to intentionally test its security.






[[folder: Anime & Manga]]
* [[Manga/MagicKaito Kaitou Kid]] is a PhantomThief who steals jewels. However, he's only looking for one jewel in particular to protect it from a secret organization who killed his father. Any other jewels he steals along the way that aren't it, he either discards to be found or returns himself.

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[[folder: Anime [[folder:Anime & Manga]]
* [[Manga/MagicKaito Kaitou Kid]] is a PhantomThief who steals jewels. However, he's only looking for one jewel in particular to protect it from a secret organization who killed his father. Any other jewels he steals along the way that aren't it, he either discards to be found or returns himself.
Manga]]



* ''Manga/MagicKaito'': Kaitou Kid is a PhantomThief who steals jewels. However, he's only looking for one jewel in particular to protect it from a secret organization who killed his father. Any other jewels he steals along the way that aren't it, he either discards to be found or returns himself.



[[folder: Comic Books]]
* The primary storylines in ''X-Thieves'' all dealt with Caper Rationalizations.
* ''ComicBook/BuffyTheVampireSlayer Season Eight'': It's revealed in issue 10 that in order to fund her big Slayer Organization, Buffy robbed a Swiss bank account, rationalizing that due to the bank's insurance, it was a "victimless crime." Willow is not convinced, pointing out that her actions [[NotHelpingYourCase just support the government's fears]] [[BewareTheSuperman of Slayers]] [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveSupernaturalPowers acting above the law]].

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[[folder: Comic [[folder:Comic Books]]
* The primary storylines in ''X-Thieves'' all dealt with Caper Rationalizations.
* ''ComicBook/BuffyTheVampireSlayer Season Eight'': It's revealed in issue 10 that in order to fund her big Slayer Organization, Buffy robbed a Swiss bank account, rationalizing that due to the bank's insurance, it was a "victimless crime." crime". Willow is not convinced, pointing out that her actions [[NotHelpingYourCase just support the government's fears]] [[BewareTheSuperman of Slayers]] [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveSupernaturalPowers acting above the law]].law]].
%%* The primary storylines in ''X-Thieves'' all dealt with Caper Rationalizations.



[[folder: Fairy Tales]]

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[[folder: Fairy [[folder:Fairy Tales]]



[[folder: Film]]

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[[folder: Film]][[folder:Film — Live-Action]]



* ''Film/{{The Parole Officer}}'' features the CaperCrew breaking into a bank to steal a security tape that will both exonerate the protagonist and indict the bent copper who strangled a human being. Well, [[AcceptableProfessionalTargets an accountant, anyway]].
* ''Film/{{The Anderson Tapes}}'' has Anderson invoking this trope over the theft he's planning. It's actually a favor to the victims, who over-insure property. The cops have somebody to chase, the newspapers have something to write about. The list goes on. Then he subverts it by saying he's just in it for the money.

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* ''Film/{{The Parole Officer}}'' ''Film/TheParoleOfficer'' features the CaperCrew breaking into a bank to steal a security tape that will both exonerate the protagonist and indict the bent copper who strangled a human being. Well, [[AcceptableProfessionalTargets an accountant, anyway]].
* ''Film/{{The Anderson Tapes}}'' ''Film/TheAndersonTapes'' has Anderson invoking this trope over the theft he's planning. It's actually a favor to the victims, who over-insure property. The cops have somebody to chase, the newspapers have something to write about. The list goes on. Then he subverts it by saying he's just in it for the money.



* Disney/{{Tangled}}: The Pub Thugs are played as lovable in the end, but let's not forget that up until Rapunzel meets them, they are killers and thieves.



[[folder: Literature]]

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[[folder: Literature]][[folder:Literature]]



* ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' is all about this, because [[WeHelpTheHelpless the heroes help the helpless]].
** Interestingly, when they face off against another crew, they end up getting the mastermind to turn over a painting to its rightful owners. When asked if he likes feeling like a good guy, he points out that they're still thieves and are just fooling themselves.
** The first season finale, at least for Nate, is almost exclusively to [[spoiler:screw his former employer, an insurance company, for refusing to pay for his son's experimental surgery, resulting in the boy's death]].
** In the fourth season finale, though, the rationalization is revenge for [[spoiler:killing Nate's father]].
** In the series finale, the rationalization is that [[spoiler:global law enforcement is ''refusing'' to prosecute the culprits behind the 2008 financial crisis; they caught so many big names in global finance in the act of robbing the world blind that arresting them would [[ApocalypseHow/{{Class1}} destroy the global economy]].]]
* ''Series/BurnNotice'', for precisely the same reason as the ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' crew.

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!!!'''Series:'''
* ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' is all about An episode of ''Series/ANTFarm'' had aspiring artist Fletcher meet his inspiration, who was now down on his luck. Fletcher gave the man one of his paintings, only to discover later that he was selling it as his own. The A.N.T.s decided to steal it back to prevent this, because [[WeHelpTheHelpless which Fletcher did... only he replaced it with ''an exact copy of the heroes help the helpless]].
** Interestingly, when they face off against another crew, they end up getting the mastermind to turn over a painting to its rightful owners. When asked if he likes feeling like a good guy, he points out that they're still thieves and are just fooling themselves.
** The first season finale, at least for Nate, is almost exclusively to [[spoiler:screw his former employer, an insurance company, for refusing to pay for his son's experimental surgery, resulting in the boy's death]].
** In the fourth season finale, though, the rationalization is revenge for [[spoiler:killing Nate's father]].
** In the series finale, the rationalization is that [[spoiler:global law enforcement is ''refusing'' to prosecute the culprits behind the 2008 financial crisis; they caught so many big names in global finance in the act of robbing the world blind that arresting them would [[ApocalypseHow/{{Class1}} destroy the global economy]].]]
*
same painting''!
%%*
''Series/BurnNotice'', for precisely the same reason as the ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' crew.crew.
* ''Series/DoctorWho''
** Subverted very quickly in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E15PlanetOfTheDead "Planet of the Dead"]], in which Lady Christina de Souza claims to have robbed a museum because her father lost the family fortune — then admits it was just for the thrill. The Doctor claims to disapprove... [[NotSoDifferent then admits he stole the TARDIS from his own people so he could go have adventures]].
** Played with in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E5TimeHeist "Time Heist"]], in which the Doctor and Clara learn that they agreed to break into the galaxy's biggest bank, and then had their memories wiped to get past the telepathic security. They assume that there must ''be'' a caper rationalisation, even if they don't remember it, because otherwise they wouldn't have agreed. It eventually turns out that [[spoiler:it's not a robbery, it's a rescue mission]].
* In the ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' episode "Liars, Guns and Money", the bank robbery planned and executed by the Moya crew is so they can buy D'Argo's son, who is about to be sold into slavery; however, just to keep the few morally-upstanding members of the crew from getting troubled, the bank Stark chose to rob is actually used exclusively by criminals to hide their ill-gotten gains.



** The episode "Ariel." Simon plans a heist on a hospital, stealing medicines that the crew can sell for profit on the black market. The rationalization is two fold: One, that Simon's real goal is to get his sister River into an imaging suite so he can find out what the Alliance did to her at the Academy, and two, it's pointed out that as it's an Alliance hospital on a core world, they'll be restocked almost immediately, while the black market caters to people who otherwise wouldn't be able to get treatment.
--> '''Wash''': "It's all very noble, us stealing from the rich… selling to the poor…"
** The point is emphasized by the contrast to the earlier episode, "The Train Job," in which the trope is initially averted -- the plucky heroes are quite blase about the fact that they are committing crime for no reason other than their own pecuniary gain -- but then subverted when they then return the stolen goods when they discover them to be medicine that is sorely needed on a poor planet.
--> '''Sheriff Bourne''': (''catching Mal returning stolen medicine to a plague-stricken town'') You were truthful back in town. These are tough times. A man can get a job, he might not look too close at what that job is. But a man learns all the details of a situation like ours... well... then he has a choice.\\

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** The episode "Ariel." "Ariel": Simon plans a heist on a hospital, stealing medicines that the crew can sell for profit on the black market. The rationalization is two fold: twofold: One, that Simon's real goal is to get his sister River into an imaging suite so he can find out what the Alliance did to her at the Academy, and two, it's pointed out that as it's an Alliance hospital on a core world, they'll be restocked almost immediately, while the black market caters to people who otherwise wouldn't be able to get treatment.
--> '''Wash''': "It's --->'''Wash:''' It's all very noble, us stealing from the rich… selling to the poor…"
poor…
** The point is emphasized by the contrast to the earlier episode, episode "The Train Job," Job", in which the trope is initially averted -- the plucky heroes are quite blase blasé about the fact that they are committing crime for no reason other than their own pecuniary gain -- but then subverted when they then return the stolen goods when they discover them to be medicine that is sorely needed on a poor planet.
--> '''Sheriff --->'''Sheriff Bourne''': (''catching Mal returning stolen medicine to a plague-stricken town'') You were truthful back in town. These are tough times. A man can get a job, he might not look too close at what that job is. But a man learns all the details of a situation like ours... well... then he has a choice.\\



** And again in the episode "Trash", where the group unites with [[ManipulativeBitch Saffron]] to steal from an Alliance officer who designed chemical and biological weapons and then looted the places where he used them. [[spoiler:Surprise, surprise, it turns out that whole story may have been a MotivationalLie on Saffron's part.]]
* ''Series/DoctorWho''
** Subverted very quickly in the episode "Planet of the Dead", in which Lady Christina de Souza claims to have robbed a museum because her father lost the family fortune - then admits it was just for the thrill. The Doctor claims to disapprove... [[NotSoDifferent then admits he stole the TARDIS from his own people so he could go have adventures.]]
** Played with in the episode "Time Heist", in which the Doctor and Clara learn that they agreed to break into the galaxy's biggest bank, and then had their memories wiped to get past the telepathic security. They assume that there must ''be'' a caper rationalisation, even if they don't remember it, because otherwise they wouldn't have agreed. It eventually turns out that [[spoiler: it's not a robbery, it's a rescue mission.]]
* In the ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' episode "Liars, Guns and Money", the bank robbery planned and executed by the Moya crew is so they can buy D'Argo's son, who is about to be sold into slavery; however, just to keep the few morally-upstanding members of the crew from getting troubled, the bank Stark chose to rob is actually used exclusively by criminals to hide their ill-gotten gains.
* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' used the espionage or dealing with organized crime rationalizations. A bit of a twist on the trope since nearly all their cases were black-ops work for the government.

to:

** And again in the episode "Trash", where the group unites with [[ManipulativeBitch Saffron]] to steal from an Alliance officer who designed chemical and biological weapons and then looted the places where he used them. [[spoiler:Surprise, surprise, it turns out that whole story may have been a MotivationalLie on Saffron's part.]]
* ''Series/DoctorWho''
** Subverted very quickly in the episode "Planet of the Dead", in which Lady Christina de Souza claims to have robbed a museum because her father lost the family fortune - then admits it was just for the thrill. The Doctor claims to disapprove... [[NotSoDifferent then admits he stole the TARDIS from his own people so he could go have adventures.]]
** Played with in the episode "Time Heist", in which the Doctor and Clara learn that they agreed to break into the galaxy's biggest bank, and then had their memories wiped to get past the telepathic security. They assume that there must ''be'' a caper rationalisation, even if they don't remember it, because otherwise they wouldn't have agreed. It eventually turns out that [[spoiler: it's not a robbery, it's a rescue mission.]]
* In the ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' episode "Liars, Guns and Money", the bank robbery planned and executed by the Moya crew is so they can buy D'Argo's son, who is about to be sold into slavery; however, just to keep the few morally-upstanding members of the crew from getting troubled, the bank Stark chose to rob is actually used exclusively by criminals to hide their ill-gotten gains.
* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' used the espionage or dealing with organized crime rationalizations. A bit of a twist on the trope since nearly all their cases were black-ops work for the government.
]]



* An episode of ''Series/ANTFarm'' had aspiring artist Fletcher meet his inspiration, who was now down on his luck. Fletcher gave the man one of his paintings, only to discover later that he was selling it as his own. The A.N.T.s decided to steal it back to prevent this, which Fletcher did... only he replaced it with ''an exact copy of the same painting''!
* The Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} TV movie ''Film/{{Swindle}}'' has a DoubleSubversion. At first, the group tries to steal the [[MacGuffin Honus Wagner card]] back from Swindell, but after realizing that even if they pulled it off, they would never be able to sell it, plot to get him to give it back to them so they can sell it legally... and they still pursue this goal in a highly illegal manner, but the audience doesn't mind since [[JerkAss Swindell]] well, [[MeaningfulName swindled]] Ben, who really needs the money.

to:

* An episode of ''Series/ANTFarm'' had aspiring artist Fletcher meet his inspiration, who was now down on his luck. Fletcher gave the man one of his paintings, only to discover later that he was selling it as his own. The A.N.T.s decided to steal it back to prevent ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' is all about this, because [[WeHelpTheHelpless the heroes help the helpless]].
** Interestingly, when they face off against another crew, they end up getting the mastermind to turn over a painting to its rightful owners. When asked if he likes feeling like a good guy, he points out that they're still thieves and are just fooling themselves.
** The first season finale, at least for Nate, is almost exclusively to [[spoiler:screw his former employer, an insurance company, for refusing to pay for his son's experimental surgery, resulting in the boy's death]].
** In the fourth season finale, though, the rationalization is revenge for [[spoiler:killing Nate's father]].
** In the series finale, the rationalization is that [[spoiler:global law enforcement is ''refusing'' to prosecute the culprits behind the 2008 financial crisis; they caught so many big names in global finance in the act of robbing the world blind that arresting them would [[ApocalypseHow/Class1 destroy the global economy]].]]
* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' used the espionage or dealing with organized crime rationalizations. A bit of a twist on the trope since nearly all their cases were black-ops work for the government.
* In ''Series/MoneyHeist'', the protagonists justify the heist because they aren't actually stealing from anyone, they're just printing new money,
which Fletcher did... only he replaced it with ''an exact copy the central bank does all the time anyway. This actually applies in universe as well, because a key part of the same painting''!
* The Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} TV movie ''Film/{{Swindle}}'' has a DoubleSubversion. At first,
plan is to win over the group tries to steal sympathy of the [[MacGuffin Honus Wagner card]] back from Swindell, but after realizing that even if they pulled it off, they would never be able to sell it, plot to get him to give it back to them so they can sell it legally... and they still pursue this goal in a highly illegal manner, but the audience doesn't mind since [[JerkAss Swindell]] well, [[MeaningfulName swindled]] Ben, who really needs the money.public.



* In ''Series/MoneyHeist'', the protagonists justify the heist because they aren't actually stealing from anyone, they're just printing new money, which the central bank does all the time anyway. This actually applies in universe as well, because a key part of the plan is to win over the sympathy of the public.

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!!!'''TV Movies:'''
* In ''Series/MoneyHeist'', The Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} TV movie ''Film/{{Swindle}}'' has a DoubleSubversion. At first, the protagonists justify group tries to steal the heist because [[MacGuffin Honus Wagner card]] back from Swindell, but after realizing that even if they aren't actually stealing from anyone, they're just printing new money, which pulled it off, they would never be able to sell it, plot to get him to give it back to them so they can sell it legally... and they still pursue this goal in a highly illegal manner, but the central bank does all the time anyway. This actually applies in universe as audience doesn't mind since [[JerkAss Swindell]] well, because a key part of [[MeaningfulName swindled]] Ben, who really needs the plan is to win over the sympathy of the public. money.


* In ''Film/CatchThatKid'', the motivation of the heist is to get enough money to pay for an expensive surgery for the main protagonist's ailing father. It's also helped that the bank manager is a BadBoss who refused to give the mother a loan because [[DispraportionateRetribution the sercurity system she's installing isn't done yet]].

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* In ''Film/CatchThatKid'', the motivation of the heist is to get enough money to pay for an expensive surgery for the main protagonist's ailing father. It's also helped that the bank manager is a BadBoss who refused to give the mother a loan because [[DispraportionateRetribution [[DisproportionateRetribution the sercurity security system she's installing isn't done yet]].


* {{Literature/Dirk Gentlys Holistic Detective Agency}} has this as a plot point. No, not that there's a caper, but that there's a rationalization. Richard unthinkingly leaves a voice message on his girlfriend Susan's answering machine where he offers to take her on a trip, only to realize immediately afterward that he'll have to cancel due to work commitments. As he's done this multiple times and it's straining their relationship considerably, he opts to scale a wall, break into her apartment through a window, and swipe the tape before she can hear the message, to spare her feelings at being ditched again. [[spoiler:The reason this is significant it that Richard is acting irrationally, endangering his life and breaking the law over a minor matter. He's not actually acting of his own accord; a spirit has possessed him and is pushing him to do this in order to determine whether he is the sort of person who will go to extreme lengths to undo a past mistake, and thus a suitably subject to help fulfill the ghost's mission. To an outside observer it's obvious that this is stupid, but Richard insists he is being logical. In the end Richard stops himself at the last moment and puts the tape back, at which point the ghost abandons him as a lost cause]].

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* {{Literature/Dirk Gentlys Holistic Detective Agency}} has this as a plot point. No, not that there's a caper, but that there's a rationalization. Richard unthinkingly leaves a voice message on his girlfriend Susan's answering machine where he offers to take her on a trip, only to realize immediately afterward that he'll have to cancel due to work commitments. As he's done this multiple times and it's straining their relationship considerably, he opts to scale a wall, break into her apartment through a window, and swipe the tape before she can hear the message, to spare her feelings at being ditched again. [[spoiler:The reason this is significant it that Richard is acting irrationally, endangering his life and breaking the law over a minor matter. He's not actually acting of his own accord; a spirit has possessed him and is pushing him to do this in order to determine whether he is the sort of person who will go to extreme lengths to undo a past mistake, and thus a suitably suitable subject to help fulfill the ghost's mission. To an outside observer it's obvious that this is stupid, but Richard insists he is being logical. In the end Richard stops himself at the last moment and puts the tape back, at which point the ghost abandons him as a lost cause]].


* {{Literature/Dirk Gentlys Holistic Detective Agency}} has this as a plot point. No, not that there's a caper, but that there's a rationalization. Richard unthinkingly leaves a voice message on his girlfriend Susan's answering machine where he offers to take her on a trip, only to realize immediately afterward that he'll have to cancel due to work commitments. As he's done this multiple times and it's straining their relationship considerably, he opts to scale a wall, break into her apartment through a window, and swipe the tape before she can hear the message, to spare her feelings at being ditched again. [[spoiler:The reason this is significant it that Richard is acting irrationally, endangering his life and breaking the law over a minor matter. He's not actually acting of his own accord; a spirit has possessed him and is pushing him to do this in order to determine whether he is the sort of person who will go to extreme lengths to undo a past mistake, and thus a suitably subject to help fulfill the ghost's mission; to an outside observer it's obvious that this is stupid. In the end Richard stops himself at the last moment and puts the tape back, at which point the ghost abandons him as a lost cause]].

to:

* {{Literature/Dirk Gentlys Holistic Detective Agency}} has this as a plot point. No, not that there's a caper, but that there's a rationalization. Richard unthinkingly leaves a voice message on his girlfriend Susan's answering machine where he offers to take her on a trip, only to realize immediately afterward that he'll have to cancel due to work commitments. As he's done this multiple times and it's straining their relationship considerably, he opts to scale a wall, break into her apartment through a window, and swipe the tape before she can hear the message, to spare her feelings at being ditched again. [[spoiler:The reason this is significant it that Richard is acting irrationally, endangering his life and breaking the law over a minor matter. He's not actually acting of his own accord; a spirit has possessed him and is pushing him to do this in order to determine whether he is the sort of person who will go to extreme lengths to undo a past mistake, and thus a suitably subject to help fulfill the ghost's mission; to mission. To an outside observer it's obvious that this is stupid.stupid, but Richard insists he is being logical. In the end Richard stops himself at the last moment and puts the tape back, at which point the ghost abandons him as a lost cause]].

Added DiffLines:

* {{Literature/Dirk Gentlys Holistic Detective Agency}} has this as a plot point. No, not that there's a caper, but that there's a rationalization. Richard unthinkingly leaves a voice message on his girlfriend Susan's answering machine where he offers to take her on a trip, only to realize immediately afterward that he'll have to cancel due to work commitments. As he's done this multiple times and it's straining their relationship considerably, he opts to scale a wall, break into her apartment through a window, and swipe the tape before she can hear the message, to spare her feelings at being ditched again. [[spoiler:The reason this is significant it that Richard is acting irrationally, endangering his life and breaking the law over a minor matter. He's not actually acting of his own accord; a spirit has possessed him and is pushing him to do this in order to determine whether he is the sort of person who will go to extreme lengths to undo a past mistake, and thus a suitably subject to help fulfill the ghost's mission; to an outside observer it's obvious that this is stupid. In the end Richard stops himself at the last moment and puts the tape back, at which point the ghost abandons him as a lost cause]].

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/CatchThatKid'', the motivation of the heist is to get enough money to pay for an expensive surgery for the main protagonist's ailing father. It's also helped that the bank manager is a BadBoss who refused to give the mother a loan because [[DispraportionateRetribution the sercurity system she's installing isn't done yet]].


* Franchise/SlyCooper and the Cooper Gang generally target criminals, generally for the challenge.

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* Franchise/SlyCooper VideoGame/SlyCooper and the Cooper Gang generally target criminals, generally for the challenge.

Added DiffLines:


[[folder:Western Animation]]
* In the ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode where Joe's daughter is born, he borrows money from a loan shark to pay the hospital bill, but when he can't pay back the loan shark, Peter convinces Joe to help him steal from his father in-law, Carter Pewterschmith, who is having a party with his millionaire friends [[ItMakesSenseInContext who will leave a vast fortune stashed in Carter's safe.]] When Peter, Quagmire, and Cleveland make it into the vault, Joe tells Peter to grab the amount needed to pay the loan shark, but Peter decides to grab as much as he can as payback for Carter treating him like crap. Lois manages to tell Joe to not take the money because her father will hunt him down, and put him in prison if he goes through it, Peter is more hesitant, but puts the money back when Macho man Randy Savage yells at him. At the end, Carter doesn't find out about the attempted robbery, and Joe paid back the loan shark with money Lois got from her father. When Peter asks how she convinced him to help Joe, she tells him she lied and said the money was for a divorce lawyer. Peter thinks she's joking, but becomes worried when she silently gets up from the dinner table.
[[/folder]]


* The car thieves in ''Film/GoneIn60Seconds2000'', in contrast to the 1974 original, are stealing cars for a crime boss not on commission, but because the protagonist's younger brother owes said boss a lot money and will be killed if they can't deliver the goods. The heroes come out even better by the end, as once the villain has been dealt with, they give the cops a tip as to where they can find and recover the stolen vehicles.

to:

* The car thieves in ''Film/GoneIn60Seconds2000'', ''Film/GoneInSixtySeconds2000'', in contrast to the 1974 original, are stealing cars for a crime boss not on commission, but because the protagonist's younger brother owes said boss a lot money and will be killed if they can't deliver the goods. The heroes come out even better by the end, as once the villain has been dealt with, they give the cops a tip as to where they can find and recover the stolen vehicles.

Added DiffLines:

* The car thieves in ''Film/GoneIn60Seconds2000'', in contrast to the 1974 original, are stealing cars for a crime boss not on commission, but because the protagonist's younger brother owes said boss a lot money and will be killed if they can't deliver the goods. The heroes come out even better by the end, as once the villain has been dealt with, they give the cops a tip as to where they can find and recover the stolen vehicles.

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[[folder:Web Animation]]
* In ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'', Team RWBY and JN_R both go with the idea of stealing an aircraft to get to Atlas as they absolutely, positively need to get there so they can get to the next Relic before the bad guys do.
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** And again in the episode "Trash", where the group unites with [[ManipulativeBitch Saffron]] to steal from an Alliance officer who designed chemical and biological weapons and then looted the places where he used them. [[spoiler:Surprise, surprise, it turns out that whole story was a MotivationalLie on Saffron's part.]]

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** And again in the episode "Trash", where the group unites with [[ManipulativeBitch Saffron]] to steal from an Alliance officer who designed chemical and biological weapons and then looted the places where he used them. [[spoiler:Surprise, surprise, it turns out that whole story was may have been a MotivationalLie on Saffron's part.]]

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