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* ReplacedWithReplica: Both the protagonists and their rival Father Feodor are looking for a set of chairs with a treasure hidden inside. Ostap manages to locate documents which detail where the chairs are. Father Feodor is after these documents, too, but he is late, and the archivist is angry that Ostap fooled him. So the archivist gives Feodor documents on another, identical set of chairs with no treasure inside.


Creator/MelBrooks directed a well-liked adaptation in 1970, with a wonderfully [[LargeHam hammy]] Creator/RonMoody as Vorobyaninov.

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Creator/MelBrooks directed a well-liked adaptation in 1970, with a wonderfully [[LargeHam hammy]] Creator/RonMoody as Vorobyaninov.
Vorobyaninov, with Creator/DomDeLuise as Father Fyodor, Creator/FrankLangella as Ostap Bender, and Creator/MelBrooks as Tikon.



* DrivenToMadness: Father Fyodor. [[spoiler:Probably Vorobyaninov too.]]

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* DrivenToMadness: Father Fyodor. [[spoiler:Probably Fyodor [[spoiler:and Vorobyaninov too.after someone else finds the jewels.]]



* LifeImitatesArt: In the 1980s the city administration did start to sell tickets at the entrance of Proval tunnel. And then closed it for a few years to clean the lake from debris and reinforce walls. Otherwise it could have collapsed by now.
* LighterAndSofter: Downplayed with the 1970 Mel Brooks film, where [[spoiler: Bender doesn't get killed, and after Vorobyaninov goes insane, Bender urges the crowd to help his broken partner, and they reconcile as partners in crime]].



** LifeImitatesArt: In the 1980s the city administration did start to sell tickets at the entrance of Proval tunnel. And then closed it for a few years to clean the lake from debris and reinforce walls. Otherwise it could have collapsed by now.
* MundaneSolution\\MugglesDoItBetter: When Bender visits a newspaper, there's a brief episode about the employees discussing their own enrichment scheme: buy government bonds, win a large sum and purchase several cars to go to a Caucasian resort for vacation. Months later, when Bender happens to be at said resort, [[BrickJoke he meets the same people who did exactly that and succeeded]], without any of the hardships Bender endured in his pursuit. He ends up begging money from them.

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** LifeImitatesArt: In the 1980s the city administration did start to sell tickets at the entrance of Proval tunnel. And then closed it for a few years to clean the lake from debris and reinforce walls. Otherwise it could have collapsed by now.
* MundaneSolution\\MugglesDoItBetter: MundaneSolution[=/=]MugglesDoItBetter: When Bender visits a newspaper, there's a brief episode about the employees discussing their own enrichment scheme: buy government bonds, win a large sum and purchase several cars to go to a Caucasian resort for vacation. Months later, when Bender happens to be at said resort, [[BrickJoke he meets the same people who did exactly that and succeeded]], without any of the hardships Bender endured in his pursuit. He ends up begging money from them.



* OpportunisticBastard: Vorobyanninov, who kills Ostap Bender after Father Fyodor goes mad, so he can get all the jewels for himself.
* PyrrhicVillainy: After Father Fyodor gets lost in a village and goes insane, Vorobyaninov murders Ostap Bender to keep the loot for himself, only to discover that someone else already found the jewels and used them to build a new public recreation center, Vorobyaninov loses his sanity.



* SanitySlippage: In the book, after Vorobyaninov murders Ostap Bender, he finds the last chair, only to discover that the jewels have already been found and used to build the new recreation center where the chair was found, and goes insane.
** After following a bad lead, Father Fyodor ends up losing his sanity on a mountaintop.



* UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist: Kisa Vorobyaninov

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* SparedByTheAdaptation: Ostap Bender in Mel Brooks' 1970 film, as contrasted with the novel where he gets killed.
* UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist: Kisa VorobyaninovVorobyaninov.


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* WoundedGazelleGambit: In the 1970 Mel Brooks film, Vorobyaninov and Bender have rehearsed a routine where Vorobyaninov falls to the ground and fakes an epileptic seizure to win the crowd's sympathy.

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* HastilyHiddenMacGuffin: The entire plot is built on that. Madame Petukhova, an Imperial Russian noblewoman, hid her collection of jewelry in a chair during the Revolution of 1917, to prevent the revolutionaries from confiscating them. Years later, her son-in-law Ippolit Vorobyaninoff learns about that from Madame on her deathbed, and starts to look for that chair. As you can guess from the title, there are eleven more chairs looking exactly like that one.


In post-civil war Soviet Russia, [[ImpoverishedPatrician a former member of nobility]], Ippolit Matveyevich Vorobyaninov, works as a desk clerk, until his mother-in-law reveals on her deathbed that her family jewelry had been hidden from the Bolsheviks in one of the twelve chairs from the family's dining room set. [[MacGuffin Those chairs]], along with all other personal property, had been expropriated by the government [[RedOctober during the Civil War]]. He becomes a treasure hunter, and after the [[ManipulativeBastard smooth operator]] and ConMan [[MagnificentBastard Ostap Bender]] forces Kisa ("Kitty", Vorobyaninov's [[EmbarrassingNickname funny childhood nickname]], which Bender prefers to long "Ippolit") to partner with him, they set off to track down the chairs. This ultimately helps Kisa, who doesn't possess [[LoveableRogue Bender's charm]] and is not as street-smart.

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In post-civil war Soviet Russia, [[ImpoverishedPatrician a former member of nobility]], Ippolit Matveyevich Vorobyaninov, works as a desk clerk, until his mother-in-law reveals on her deathbed that her family jewelry had been hidden from the Bolsheviks in one of the twelve chairs from the family's dining room set. [[MacGuffin Those chairs]], along with all other personal property, had been expropriated by the government [[RedOctober [[UsefulNotes/RedOctober during the Civil War]]. He becomes a treasure hunter, and after the [[ManipulativeBastard smooth operator]] and ConMan [[MagnificentBastard Ostap Bender]] forces Kisa ("Kitty", Vorobyaninov's [[EmbarrassingNickname funny childhood nickname]], which Bender prefers to long "Ippolit") to partner with him, they set off to track down the chairs. This ultimately helps Kisa, who doesn't possess [[LoveableRogue Bender's charm]] and is not as street-smart.

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* InternalHomage: Due to time constraints, the Mell Brooks film cuts out all the WackyWaysideTribe scenes, including the iconic chess tournament. To compensate, one of the final scenes takes place in a chess room of the new railroad club.


Creator/MelBrooks directed an adaptation in 1970. Two different Russian adaptations have created a bit of a BrokenBase amongst the Russian viewers. The main point of contention is whether [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrei_Mironov Andrei Mironov's]] interpretation of Bender as less of a LovableRogue and more of a VillainProtagonist works.

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Creator/MelBrooks directed an a well-liked adaptation in 1970. 1970, with a wonderfully [[LargeHam hammy]] Creator/RonMoody as Vorobyaninov.

Two different other Russian adaptations have created a bit of a BrokenBase amongst the Russian viewers. The main point of contention is whether [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrei_Mironov Andrei Mironov's]] interpretation of Bender as less of a LovableRogue and more of a VillainProtagonist works.


* AdaptationalBadass: By omission. The movie adaptations tend to leave out Bender's more humiliating moments, such as when he gets royally plastered and misses the chance to catch their prize (which is the only time he gets called out by Kisa and doesn't have a retort) or when he gets beten up by some highlanders when he got caught cheating in cards.

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* AdaptationalBadass: By omission. The movie adaptations tend to leave out Bender's more humiliating moments, such as when he gets royally plastered and misses the chance to catch their prize (which is the only time he gets called out by Kisa and doesn't have a retort) or when he gets beten beaten up by some highlanders when he got caught cheating in cards.


* ConvulsiveSeizures: in the Mel Brooks movie, it wasn't in the book.

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* ConvulsiveSeizures: in the Mel Brooks movie, it Bender teaches Kisa to do this as a way of conning charity out of passers-by. It wasn't in the book.

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* AtomicFBomb: In the Mel Brooks movie, after yet another chair turns out to contain nothing of value.
-->'''Bender:''' Remember the famous Russian proverb: "The hungrier you get, the tastier the meal." On the other hand, the French have a proverb: [[SuddenlyShouting MERDE!]]


* AdaptationalBadass: By omission. The movie adaptations tend to leave out Bender's more humiliating moments, such as when he gets royally plastered and misses the chance to catch their prize (which is the only time he gets called out by Kisa and doesn't have a retort) or when he gets beten up by some highlanders when he got caught cheating in cards.



* GiftedlyBad: Lapis-Trubetskoy, whose poems are filled with inane tautologies. Bender calls him [[FreudianSlip Lapsus]]-Trubetskoy. Later he is seen trying to sell poetry to several different magazine editors, changing the subject matter every time—for example, he calls his submission to a medical journal "The Ballad of Gangrene."

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* GiftedlyBad: Lapis-Trubetskoy, whose poems are filled with inane tautologies. Bender One of his colleagues calls him [[FreudianSlip Lapsus]]-Trubetskoy. Later he is seen trying to sell poetry to several different magazine editors, changing the subject matter every time—for example, he calls his submission to a medical journal "The Ballad of Gangrene."



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* {{Greed}}: The story could be seen as a criticism of capitalistic greed (Something highly disapproved of in Socialist Russia). Ippolit and Fyodor were living comfortably before they learned of the jewels, but the desire for Petukhova's jewels caused them to destroy their livelihoods and their lives in pursuit of the hidden treasure. [[spoiler:Meanwhile, the people who ''do'' find the jewels act like proper socialists and spend the treasure not on themselves, but on a project whose benefits they can share with their fellow workers.]]

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* {{Greed}}: The story could be seen as a criticism of capitalistic greed (Something (something highly disapproved of in Socialist Russia). Ippolit and Fyodor were living comfortably before they learned of the jewels, but the desire for Petukhova's jewels caused them to destroy their livelihoods and their lives in pursuit of the hidden treasure. [[spoiler:Meanwhile, the people who ''do'' find the jewels act like proper socialists and spend the treasure not on themselves, but on a project whose benefits they can share with their fellow workers.]]



* ThoseTwoActors: Mironov and Papanov duo in one of the adaptations

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* NeedleInAStackOfNeedles: The jewels are hidden in one of a set of twelve externally identical chairs.


* BrickJoke: Kisa's first appearance in the Mel Brooks film has him rushing home from his workplace, still holding a rubber stamp that he was presumably using when he heard the news that Mme Petukhova was dying. He's still holding the stamp during the entire conversation where he learns about the jewels. And he's still holding the stamp when he kisses his mother-in-law goodbye, resulting in the word CANCELLED being stamped on her face.



* MundaneSolution\\MugglesDoItBetter: When Bender visits a newspaper, there's a brief episode about the employees discussing their own enrichment scheme: buy government bonds, win a large sum and purchase several cars to go to a Caucasian resort for vacation. Months later, when Bender happens to be at said resort, [[BrickJoke he meets the same people who did exactly that and succeded]], without any of the hardships Bender endured in his pursuit. He ends up begging money from them.

to:

* MundaneSolution\\MugglesDoItBetter: When Bender visits a newspaper, there's a brief episode about the employees discussing their own enrichment scheme: buy government bonds, win a large sum and purchase several cars to go to a Caucasian resort for vacation. Months later, when Bender happens to be at said resort, [[BrickJoke he meets the same people who did exactly that and succeded]], succeeded]], without any of the hardships Bender endured in his pursuit. He ends up begging money from them.


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* {{Unperson}}: Referenced in the Mel Brooks adaptation. A street named after Russian nobility had its name crossed out and a new sign placed naming the street after heroes of the revolution. And one of those names is crossed out as well, as one of the heroes honored by the street name (Trotsky) had fallen out of favor with the leaders of the revolution.

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* ImpossibleThief: In the movie adaptation Alchen steals details from a ''painting''. No, he doesn't cut them out, he just steals them.


* MundaneSolution\\MugglesDoItBetter: When Bender visits a newspaper, there's a brief episode about the employees discussing their own enrichment scheme: buy government bonds, win a large sum and purchase a bus to go to a Caucasian resort for vacation. Months later, when Bender happens to be at said resort, [[BrickJoke he meets the same people who did exactly that and succeded]]. He ends up begging money from them.

to:

* MundaneSolution\\MugglesDoItBetter: When Bender visits a newspaper, there's a brief episode about the employees discussing their own enrichment scheme: buy government bonds, win a large sum and purchase a bus several cars to go to a Caucasian resort for vacation. Months later, when Bender happens to be at said resort, [[BrickJoke he meets the same people who did exactly that and succeded]].succeded]], without any of the hardships Bender endured in his pursuit. He ends up begging money from them.

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