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Although some writers have claimed that the book was pretty much the cornerstone of the major anti-witchcraft movement and inquisitors and priests all over Europe had a copy, and thus is associated with the image of the Inquisition being a torture-fest, it's DatedHistory and it is not regarded to be nearly as officially endorsed as once thought. The book's author initially ''did'' have the support of Pope Innocent VIII in his bull ''Summis desiderantes affectibus'', but the resultant manual fell out of a favor three years after it was first published, being then officially banned by the Catholic Church [[EveryoneHasStandards due to its perceived excesses]]. Most theologians of Kramer's time condemned the book for recommending unethical and illegal procedures, as well for being inconsistent with established Christian dogma on demonology, while the various Inquisitions had higher standards for evidence and ethics (the Inquisition established the modern [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inquisitorial_system Inquisitorial system]] used today) than the book proposed. However, it had conversely a strong effect in laymen, who knew and cared much less about theological affairs, and by 1669 it was still being printed at its 36th edition, with a very tangible presence in both Catholic and Protestant witch hunts.

to:

Although some writers have claimed that the book was pretty much the cornerstone of the major anti-witchcraft movement and inquisitors and priests all over Europe had a copy, and thus is associated with the image of the Inquisition being a torture-fest, it's DatedHistory and it is not regarded to be nearly as officially endorsed as once thought. The book's author initially ''did'' have the support of Pope Innocent VIII in his bull ''Summis desiderantes affectibus'', but the resultant manual fell out of a favor three years after it was first published, being then officially banned by the Catholic Church [[EveryoneHasStandards due to its perceived excesses]]. Most theologians of Kramer's time condemned the book for recommending unethical and even outright illegal procedures, as well for being inconsistent with established Christian dogma on demonology, while the various Inquisitions had higher standards for evidence and ethics (the Inquisition established the modern [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inquisitorial_system Inquisitorial system]] used today) than the book proposed. However, it had conversely a strong effect in laymen, who knew and cared much less about theological affairs, and by 1669 it was still being printed at its 36th edition, with a very tangible presence in both Catholic and Protestant witch hunts.

Added DiffLines:

*StayInTheKitchen : Not only is the original work based on the assumption that any woman who is not subject to a man, or has her own living made is on the devil's team, but the translation by Rev. Montague Summers says straight out in the introduction that the translation is "intended to counter the current destructive age of feminism where it seems that the sexes are confounded."


It should be also said that the ''Malleus'' wasn't truly seminal by the time it was written. The witch-hunting ideas spoused in its pages had been already made popular in treatises like Johannes Nider's ''Formicarius'' (1435) and Alonso de Espina's ''Fortalitium Fidei'' (1458), and Kramer only [[LoonyFan followed their wake with more enthusiasm]]. This current had never been given a lot of credit, as witchcraft was not something the Church fathers were especially interested in prosecuting (the prevalent view since AD 900 was that witchcraft was ''not'' real and that practitioners were instead [[HappinessInMindCOntrol heretics deluded by the Devil into believing they manifested arcane powers]], therefore most punishments were light, either penances given in Confession, a spell in the city stocks, or at worst excommunication). However, the ''Malleus'' would have the effect of re-popularize all those doctrines, which, combined with the Church's awkward silence about it in the Council of Trent, effectively caused a snowball of similar works, among them those of Jean Bodin, Nicholas Rémy and Benedict Carpzov, influencing the general thought.

to:

It should be also said that the ''Malleus'' wasn't truly seminal by the time it was written. The witch-hunting ideas spoused in its pages had been already made popular in treatises like Johannes Nider's ''Formicarius'' (1435) and Alonso de Espina's ''Fortalitium Fidei'' (1458), and Kramer only [[LoonyFan followed their wake with more enthusiasm]]. This current had never been given a lot of credit, as witchcraft was not something the Church fathers were especially interested in prosecuting (the prevalent view since AD 900 was that witchcraft was ''not'' real and that practitioners were instead [[HappinessInMindCOntrol heretics deluded by the Devil into believing they manifested arcane powers]], therefore most punishments were light, either penances given in Confession, a spell in the city stocks, or at worst excommunication). However, the ''Malleus'' would have the effect of re-popularize re-popularizing all those doctrines, which, combined with the Church's awkward silence about it in the Council of Trent, effectively caused a snowball of similar works, among them those of Jean Bodin, Nicholas Rémy and Benedict Carpzov, influencing the general thought.


Although some writers have claimed that the book was pretty much the cornerstone of the major anti-witchcraft movement and inquisitors and priests all over Europe had a copy, and thus is associated with the image of the Inquisition being a torture-fest, it's DatedHistory and it is not regarded to be nearly as officially endorsed as once thought. The book's author initially ''did'' have the support of Pope Innocent VIII in his bull ''Summis desiderantes affectibus'', but the resultant manual fell out of a favor three years after it was first published, being then officially banned by the Catholic Church [[EveryoneHasStandards due to its perceived excesses]]. Most theologians of Kramer's time condemned the book for recommending unethical and illegal procedures, as well for being inconsistent with established Christian dogma on demonology, while the various Inquisitions had higher standards for evidence and ethics (the Inquisition established the modern [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inquisitorial_system Inquisitorial system]] used today) than the book proposed. However, it had conversely a strong effect in laymen, who knew and cared much less about theological affairs, and by 1669 it was still being printed at its 36th edition, with a very tangible presence in the European witch hunts of this period.

It should be also said that the ''Malleus Malleficarum'' wasn't truly seminal by the time it was written. The witch-hunting ideas spoused in its pages had been already made popular in treatises like Johannes Nider's ''Formicarius'' (1435) and Alonso de Espina's ''Fortalitium Fidei'' (1458), and Kramer only [[LoonyFan followed their wake with more enthusiasm]]. This current had never been given a lot of credit, as witchcraft was not something the Church fathers were especially interested in prosecuting (the prevalent view since AD 900 was that witchcraft was ''not'' real and that practitioners were instead [[HappinessInMindCOntrol heretics deluded by the Devil into believing they manifested arcane powers]], therefore most punishments were light, either penances given in Confession, a spell in the city stocks, or at worst excommunication). However, the ''Malleus'' would have the effect of re-popularize all those doctrines, which, combined with the Church's awkward silence about it in the Council of Trent, effectively caused a snowball of similar works that contributed to the general thought.

to:

Although some writers have claimed that the book was pretty much the cornerstone of the major anti-witchcraft movement and inquisitors and priests all over Europe had a copy, and thus is associated with the image of the Inquisition being a torture-fest, it's DatedHistory and it is not regarded to be nearly as officially endorsed as once thought. The book's author initially ''did'' have the support of Pope Innocent VIII in his bull ''Summis desiderantes affectibus'', but the resultant manual fell out of a favor three years after it was first published, being then officially banned by the Catholic Church [[EveryoneHasStandards due to its perceived excesses]]. Most theologians of Kramer's time condemned the book for recommending unethical and illegal procedures, as well for being inconsistent with established Christian dogma on demonology, while the various Inquisitions had higher standards for evidence and ethics (the Inquisition established the modern [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inquisitorial_system Inquisitorial system]] used today) than the book proposed. However, it had conversely a strong effect in laymen, who knew and cared much less about theological affairs, and by 1669 it was still being printed at its 36th edition, with a very tangible presence in the European both Catholic and Protestant witch hunts of this period.

hunts.

It should be also said that the ''Malleus Malleficarum'' ''Malleus'' wasn't truly seminal by the time it was written. The witch-hunting ideas spoused in its pages had been already made popular in treatises like Johannes Nider's ''Formicarius'' (1435) and Alonso de Espina's ''Fortalitium Fidei'' (1458), and Kramer only [[LoonyFan followed their wake with more enthusiasm]]. This current had never been given a lot of credit, as witchcraft was not something the Church fathers were especially interested in prosecuting (the prevalent view since AD 900 was that witchcraft was ''not'' real and that practitioners were instead [[HappinessInMindCOntrol heretics deluded by the Devil into believing they manifested arcane powers]], therefore most punishments were light, either penances given in Confession, a spell in the city stocks, or at worst excommunication). However, the ''Malleus'' would have the effect of re-popularize all those doctrines, which, combined with the Church's awkward silence about it in the Council of Trent, effectively caused a snowball of similar works that contributed to works, among them those of Jean Bodin, Nicholas Rémy and Benedict Carpzov, influencing the general thought.thought.


Although some writers have claimed that the book was pretty much the cornerstone of the major anti-witchcraft movement and inquisitors and priests all over Europe had a copy, and thus is associated with the image of the Inquisition being a torture-fest, it's DatedHistory and it is not regarded to be nearly as officially endorsed as once thought. The book's author initially ''did'' have the support of Pope Innocent VIII in his bull ''Summis desiderantes affectibus'', but the resultant manual fell out of a favor three years after it was first published, being then officially banned by the Catholic Church due to its perceived excesses. Most theologians of Kramer's time condemned the book for recommending unethical and illegal procedures, as well for being inconsistent with established Christian dogma on demonology, while the various Inquisitions had higher standards for evidence and ethics (the Inquisition established the modern [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inquisitorial_system Inquisitorial system]] used today) than the book proposed. However, it had conversely a strong effect in laymen, who knew and cared much less about theological affairs, and by 1669 it was still being printed at its 36th edition, with a very tangible presence in the European witch hunts of this period.

It should be also said that the ''Malleus Malleficarum'' wasn't truly seminal by the time it was written. The witch-hunting ideas spoused in its pages had been already made popular in treatises like Johannes Nider's ''Formicarius'' (1435) and Alonso de Espina's ''Fortalitium Fidei'' (1458), and Kramer only followed their wake with more enthusiasm. This current had never been given a lot of credit, as witchcraft was not something the Church fathers were especially interested in prosecuting (the prevalent view since AD 900 was that witchcraft was ''not'' real and that practitioners were instead heretics deluded by the Devil into believing they manifested arcane powers, therefore most punishments were light, either penances given in Confession, a spell in the city stocks, or at worst excommunication). However, the ''Malleus'' would have the effect of re-popularize all those doctrines, which, combined with the Church's awkward silence about it in the Council of Trent, effectively caused a snowball of similar works that contributed to the general thought.

to:

Although some writers have claimed that the book was pretty much the cornerstone of the major anti-witchcraft movement and inquisitors and priests all over Europe had a copy, and thus is associated with the image of the Inquisition being a torture-fest, it's DatedHistory and it is not regarded to be nearly as officially endorsed as once thought. The book's author initially ''did'' have the support of Pope Innocent VIII in his bull ''Summis desiderantes affectibus'', but the resultant manual fell out of a favor three years after it was first published, being then officially banned by the Catholic Church [[EveryoneHasStandards due to its perceived excesses.excesses]]. Most theologians of Kramer's time condemned the book for recommending unethical and illegal procedures, as well for being inconsistent with established Christian dogma on demonology, while the various Inquisitions had higher standards for evidence and ethics (the Inquisition established the modern [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inquisitorial_system Inquisitorial system]] used today) than the book proposed. However, it had conversely a strong effect in laymen, who knew and cared much less about theological affairs, and by 1669 it was still being printed at its 36th edition, with a very tangible presence in the European witch hunts of this period.

It should be also said that the ''Malleus Malleficarum'' wasn't truly seminal by the time it was written. The witch-hunting ideas spoused in its pages had been already made popular in treatises like Johannes Nider's ''Formicarius'' (1435) and Alonso de Espina's ''Fortalitium Fidei'' (1458), and Kramer only [[LoonyFan followed their wake with more enthusiasm. enthusiasm]]. This current had never been given a lot of credit, as witchcraft was not something the Church fathers were especially interested in prosecuting (the prevalent view since AD 900 was that witchcraft was ''not'' real and that practitioners were instead [[HappinessInMindCOntrol heretics deluded by the Devil into believing they manifested arcane powers, powers]], therefore most punishments were light, either penances given in Confession, a spell in the city stocks, or at worst excommunication). However, the ''Malleus'' would have the effect of re-popularize all those doctrines, which, combined with the Church's awkward silence about it in the Council of Trent, effectively caused a snowball of similar works that contributed to the general thought.


The ''Malleus Maleficarum'' (The Hammer of the Witches) is a witch-hunting manual written in 1486 by Heinrich Kramer, an Inquisitor of the Catholic Church, and first published in Germany, where it is known as ''Der Hexenhammer'', in 1487. Jacob Sprenger's name is also attached to the book, though it is unclear if he did anything more than endorse it. The work also has an alleged approval and endorsement from a prestigious German university of the time, an endorsement that was very likely forged by Kramer. The book is [[StrawMisogynist virulently misogynistic]], though it acknowledges that both men and women can be witches. The book encouraged the use of torture to extract confessions in ways that were not actually legal under the laws of the Inquisition. The Inquisition actually discouraged the use of this manual by their witch-hunters, and three years after it was first published, the work was officially condemned by the Catholic Church, but that did not prevent laymen from using it.

The chief crimes witches are accused of in the ''Malleus Maleficarum'' are the working of evil magic and making a DealWithTheDevil in order to obtain this power. [[SarcasmMode Women are, of course, more susceptible to The Devil due to their more carnal nature.]] Oddly enough, some of the most frequent crimes these sex-crazed sirens are accused of is [[InsaneTrollLogic stealing men's penises and causing impotency.]] [[WouldHurtAChild Baby-killing]] and [[ImAHumanitarian cannibalism]] were also apparently popular witch practices, often [[EatsBabies together]].

Although some writers have claimed that the book was pretty much the cornerstone of a major anti-witchcraft movement and judges and priests all over Europe had a copy, and thus is associated with the image of the Inquisition being a torture-fest, it's DatedHistory and it is not regarded to be nearly as influential as once thought. Most theologians of Kramer's time condemned the book for recommending unethical and illegal procedures, and for being inconsistent with established Christian dogma on demonology, while the various Inquisitions had higher standards for evidence and ethics (the Inquisition established the modern [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inquisitorial_system Inquisitorial system]] used today) than the book proposed and witchcraft was never something they were especially interested in prosecuting, often maintaining a skepticism on whether witches even existed. In the Catholic Church, the prevalent view since AD 900 was that witchcraft was ''not'' real, that practitioners who were in the Church were instead heretics deluded by the Devil into believing they manifested arcane powers. Most punishments pre-''Malleus'' were light, either penances of a sort usually given in Confession for most sins, a spell in the city stocks, or at worst excommunication.

to:

The ''Malleus Maleficarum'' (The Hammer of the Witches) is a witch-hunting manual written in 1486 by Heinrich Kramer, an Inquisitor of the Catholic Church, and first published in Germany, where it is known as ''Der Hexenhammer'', in 1487. Jacob Sprenger's name is also attached to the book, though it is unclear if he did anything more than endorse it. The work also has an alleged approval and endorsement from a prestigious German university of the time, an endorsement that was very likely forged by Kramer. The book is [[StrawMisogynist virulently misogynistic]], though it acknowledges that both men and women can be witches. The book It encouraged the use of torture to extract confessions in ways that were not actually legal under the laws of the Inquisition. The Inquisition actually discouraged the use of this manual by their witch-hunters, and three years after it was first published, the work was officially condemned by the Catholic Church, but that did not prevent laymen from using it.

Inquisition.

The chief crimes witches are accused of in the ''Malleus Maleficarum'' are the working of evil magic and making a DealWithTheDevil in order to obtain this power. [[SarcasmMode [[AllWomenAreLustful Women are, of course, more susceptible to The Devil due to their more carnal nature.]] Oddly enough, some of the most frequent crimes these sex-crazed sirens are accused of is [[InsaneTrollLogic stealing men's penises and causing impotency.]] [[WouldHurtAChild Baby-killing]] and [[ImAHumanitarian cannibalism]] were also apparently popular witch practices, often [[EatsBabies together]].

Although some writers have claimed that the book was pretty much the cornerstone of a the major anti-witchcraft movement and judges inquisitors and priests all over Europe had a copy, and thus is associated with the image of the Inquisition being a torture-fest, it's DatedHistory and it is not regarded to be nearly as influential officially endorsed as once thought. The book's author initially ''did'' have the support of Pope Innocent VIII in his bull ''Summis desiderantes affectibus'', but the resultant manual fell out of a favor three years after it was first published, being then officially banned by the Catholic Church due to its perceived excesses. Most theologians of Kramer's time condemned the book for recommending unethical and illegal procedures, and as well for being inconsistent with established Christian dogma on demonology, while the various Inquisitions had higher standards for evidence and ethics (the Inquisition established the modern [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inquisitorial_system Inquisitorial system]] used today) than the book proposed proposed. However, it had conversely a strong effect in laymen, who knew and cared much less about theological affairs, and by 1669 it was still being printed at its 36th edition, with a very tangible presence in the European witch hunts of this period.

It should be also said that the ''Malleus Malleficarum'' wasn't truly seminal by the time it was written. The witch-hunting ideas spoused in its pages had been already made popular in treatises like Johannes Nider's ''Formicarius'' (1435) and Alonso de Espina's ''Fortalitium Fidei'' (1458), and Kramer only followed their wake with more enthusiasm. This current had never been given a lot of credit, as
witchcraft was never not something they the Church fathers were especially interested in prosecuting, often maintaining a skepticism on whether witches even existed. In the Catholic Church, the prosecuting (the prevalent view since AD 900 was that witchcraft was ''not'' real, real and that practitioners who were in the Church were instead heretics deluded by the Devil into believing they manifested arcane powers. Most powers, therefore most punishments pre-''Malleus'' were light, either penances of a sort usually given in Confession for most sins, Confession, a spell in the city stocks, or at worst excommunication. excommunication). However, the ''Malleus'' would have the effect of re-popularize all those doctrines, which, combined with the Church's awkward silence about it in the Council of Trent, effectively caused a snowball of similar works that contributed to the general thought.


* EvilRedhead: "Those whose hair is red, of a certain peculiar shade, are unmistakably vampires." This was a common belief then, along with redheads being werewolves.

to:

* EvilRedhead: "Those whose hair is red, of a certain peculiar shade, are unmistakably vampires.[[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]]." This was a common belief then, along with redheads being werewolves.[[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves]].


* ImAHumanitarian: Cannibalism is described as a popular witch practice.



* ImAHumanitarian: Cannibalism is described as a popular witch practice.


* WidowWitch: [[ValuesDissonance Perhaps she fell into witchcraft because she lacked a husband's guidance]], or perhaps she was the one who did him in.

to:

* WidowWitch: [[ValuesDissonance Perhaps she fell into witchcraft because she lacked a husband's guidance]], or perhaps [[TilMurderDoUsPart she was the one who did him in.in]].


* ImAHumanitarian: Cannibalism is described as a popular witch practice.




to:

* WouldHurtAChild: Witches have a tendency to be baby-killers, according to the manual.


* WidowWitch: [[ValuesDissonance Perhaps she fell into witchcraft because she lacked a husband's guidance]], or perhaps [[BlackWidow she was the one who did him in]].

to:

* WidowWitch: [[ValuesDissonance Perhaps she fell into witchcraft because she lacked a husband's guidance]], or perhaps [[BlackWidow she was the one who did him in]].in.


* WidowWitch: [[ValuesDissonance Perhaps she fell into witchcraft because she lacked a husband's guidance]], or perhaps she was the one who did him in.

to:

* WidowWitch: [[ValuesDissonance Perhaps she fell into witchcraft because she lacked a husband's guidance]], or perhaps [[BlackWidow she was the one who did him in.in]].

Added DiffLines:

* AlliterativeTitle


The chief crimes witches are accused of in the ''Malleus Maleficarum'' are the working of evil magic and making a DealWithTheDevil in order to obtain this power. [[SarcasmMode Women are, of course, more susceptible to The Devil due to their more carnal nature.]] Oddly enough, some of the most frequent crimes these sex-crazed sirens are accused of is [[InsaneTrollLogic stealing men's penises and causing impotency.]] [[WouldHurtAChild Baby-killing]] and [[ImAHumanitarian cannibalism]] were also apparently popular witch practices, often together.

to:

The chief crimes witches are accused of in the ''Malleus Maleficarum'' are the working of evil magic and making a DealWithTheDevil in order to obtain this power. [[SarcasmMode Women are, of course, more susceptible to The Devil due to their more carnal nature.]] Oddly enough, some of the most frequent crimes these sex-crazed sirens are accused of is [[InsaneTrollLogic stealing men's penises and causing impotency.]] [[WouldHurtAChild Baby-killing]] and [[ImAHumanitarian cannibalism]] were also apparently popular witch practices, often together.
[[EatsBabies together]].


** ScienceMarchesOn: Anyone with a high school education would know why the result would be a completely human baby, not a half demon (they would probably say a supernatural influence took place).[[note]]Of course, when the "Witch's Hammer" was written, Gregor Mendel's work was nearly 400 years into the future.[[/note]]

to:

** ScienceMarchesOn: Anyone with a high school education would know why the result would be a completely human baby, not a half demon (they would probably say a supernatural influence took place).[[note]]Of course, when the "Witch's Hammer" was written, Gregor Mendel's work on genetics was nearly 400 years into the future.[[/note]]

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