Follow TV Tropes

Following

History AdaptationalHeroism / GameOfThrones

Go To



* Robert was very liberal with his MaritalRapeLicense (complete with some drunken sadism) in the books, but the show never goes into this.

to:

* Robert Baratheon:
** While it's more "refraining from villainy" than actual heroism,
Robert was very liberal with his MaritalRapeLicense (complete with some drunken sadism) in the books, but the show never goes into this.this.
** In the books he cheated on Lyanna while they were engaged, and the tryst produced an illegitimate daughter; something which she complained to Ned about Ned tried to appease her by saying Robert would end such behavior once they actually married; Lyanna was rightfully skeptical. Here he appears to have been faithful to her and only became an unrepentant womanizer only after she died, and he fell into despair. If he did cheat on her it would make her dumping him for Rhaegar more sympathetic...until you remember Rhaegar was already married.


* In the books, Daario is an arrogant and shallow BloodKnight who attracts Dany solely with his looks and [[AllGirlsWantBadBoys bad-boy attitude]]. In the show, Daario is much more thoughtful, earnest and personable.

to:

* In the books, Daario is an arrogant and arrogant, shallow and sleazy BloodKnight who attracts Dany solely with his looks and [[AllGirlsWantBadBoys bad-boy attitude]]. In the show, Daario is much more thoughtful, earnest earnest, personable and personable.friendly. Yes he is all for killing his queen's enemies, but he will also vouch for Jorah's return to court after he helps save Daenerys and shows respect to Tyrion's talents of governing.


* Drogon gets this in "The Dance of Dragons" when he plays the BigDamnHero who roasts mostly AssholeVictims to save Dany from the Sons of the Harpy rather than being attracted by the noise and slaughter to gorge on a dead fighter and roast several bystanders until Dany whips him into submission and flies off.

to:

* Drogon gets this in "The Dance of Dragons" when he plays the BigDamnHero who roasts mostly AssholeVictims to save Dany from an attack from the Sons of the Harpy in Daznak's Pit just in time rather than being attracted by the noise and slaughter to gorge on a dead fighter and roast several bystanders until Dany whips him into submission and flies off.

Added DiffLines:

**In the books, Joffrey kills peasants with a crossbow, nails antlers on the heads of Stannis's supporters, and tries to convince Tywin to exterminate three Houses. The show version never commits these crimes.


* Varys gets stacked with this. In the books, he's a [[SleazyPolitician sleazy]], [[TheHypocrite hypocritical]] GigglingVillain who preaches [[TrueNeutral neutrality]] and [[TheNeedsOfTheMany the common good]] but is NotSoDifferent from Littlefinger in PlayingBothSides and [[TheChessmaster manipulating everyone]] to serve [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans his own agenda]]. As such, he remorselessly testifies against [[spoiler: Tyrion]] and must be given AnOfferYouCantRefuse before he will help. Then there are his [[WouldHurtAChild little]] [[CreepyChild birds]]... By contrast, the show paints him as a sassy and affable OnlySaneMan and BenevolentBoss with very few KickTheDog moments and a genuine soft spot for Tyrion and the common people.

to:

* Varys gets stacked with this. In the books, he's a [[SleazyPolitician sleazy]], [[TheHypocrite hypocritical]] GigglingVillain who preaches [[TrueNeutral neutrality]] and [[TheNeedsOfTheMany the common good]] but is NotSoDifferent from Littlefinger in PlayingBothSides and [[TheChessmaster manipulating everyone]] to serve [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans his own agenda]]. As such, By contrast, the show paints him as a far less sinister sassy and affable OnlySaneMan and BenevolentBoss with very few KickTheDog moments and a genuine soft spot for Tyrion and the common people.
** Varys' friendship with Tyrion in the show is actually genuine, if vitriolic. However, in the books
he only views Tyrion as a pawn in his larger schemes and remorselessly testifies against [[spoiler: Tyrion]] Tyrion]], helping to utterly isolate the latter, and must be given AnOfferYouCantRefuse before he will help.help.
** There is no sign of his concern for Sansa in the books. The idea of marrying Sansa to a Tyrell comes from Olenna herself (albeit as a potential UnwittingPawn).
Then there are his [[WouldHurtAChild little]] [[CreepyChild birds]]... By contrast, the show paints him as a sassy and affable OnlySaneMan and BenevolentBoss with very few KickTheDog moments and a genuine soft spot for Tyrion they are are implied to have their tongues cut out to prevent idle gossip. Here, Varys states that he WouldntHurtAChild and the common people.children who work for him are shown to have been well-treated until Qyburn turns them into the silent terrors of their book counterparts, in addition to carrying out political assassinations of key figures of the Small Council that Varys was behind in the books.
** In the show, it's eventually revealed that he is totally loyal to Daenerys Targaryen albeit after walking a thin line between subterfuge and loyalty. In the books, it's revealed that he never saw her as anything other than a HotConsort first intended to be married off to Drogo to prep him for a potential invitation of Westeros, than as one for his true candidate, the AdaptedOut "Young Griff", a perfect prince. Daenerys is a constant SpannerInTheWorks to his plans and his original intention was to throw both her and Viserys under the bus.


** Taken to such extremes with Tyrion that he's practically a different character altogether. Tyrion is "[[http://www.sfsite.com/01a/gm95.htm the grayest of the gray]]" in the books, per Creator/GeorgeRRMartin, and partakes in all sorts of horrendous acts including raping slaves and setting loose ravaging barbarians on civilians out of spite, but the show omits or justifies virtually all his less-than-heroic aspects in favour of a more traditional protagonist, who happens to be a DeadpanSnarker on the side. Furthermore, in the books:

to:

** Taken to such extremes with Tyrion that he's practically a different character altogether. Tyrion is "[[http://www.sfsite.com/01a/gm95.htm the grayest of the gray]]" in the books, per Creator/GeorgeRRMartin, and partakes in all sorts of horrendous acts including raping slaves and setting loose ravaging barbarians on civilians out of spite, but the show omits or justifies virtually all his less-than-heroic aspects in favour of a more traditional protagonist, who happens to be a DeadpanSnarker on the side. Furthermore, in In the books:



* The show's Jorah Mormont is a higher tier of man than his literary counterpart, with his DirtyOldMan lust for Daenerys downplayed into AllLoveIsUnrequited and his ForcefulKiss adapted out. He also seems more ashamed of his dabbling in slavery and begs forgiveness for [[spoiler: his spying]] instead of haughtily insisting that it's all NeverMyFault as he does in the books.

to:

* The While he remains a pragmatic realist, the show's Jorah Mormont is a higher tier of man than his literary counterpart, with his DirtyOldMan lust for Daenerys downplayed into AllLoveIsUnrequited and his ForcefulKiss and asking Dany to run away with him only for her to refuse him is adapted out. He also seems more ashamed of his dabbling in slavery and finally comes to terms with Ned Stark's banishment and admits that the Lord Paramount was entirely right to punish him for his crimes, which his book counterpart has yet to do so and when the show's Daenarys banishes him from her court because she found out he was originally spying on her for Robert, he begs forgiveness for [[spoiler: his spying]] but she refuses to listen instead of her being willing to forgive him if he apologizes but him refusing because he doesn't believe he did anything wrong and haughtily insisting that it's all NeverMyFault as he does in the books.


*** In the books, he arranges at least two murders, including having a bard flat-out murdered by Bronn and given to a stew cook in Flea Bottom for threatening to expose Shae, and strangles [[spoiler: Shae]] in a crime of passion as a spiteful act of vengeance for her turning on him during his trial rather than being essentially forced to do it to prevent her from exposing Tywin's death and Shae did the grab the knife first as well, so Tyrion was mainly acting in [[TheDogShotFirst self-defence]].

to:

*** In the books, he arranges at least two murders, including having a bard flat-out murdered by Bronn and given to a stew cook in Flea Bottom for threatening to expose Shae, and strangles [[spoiler: Shae]] in a crime of passion as a spiteful act of vengeance for her turning on him during his trial rather than being essentially forced to do it to prevent her from exposing Tywin's death and in the show, Shae did the grab the knife first as well, so Tyrion was mainly acting in [[TheDogShotFirst self-defence]].


** Taken to such extremes with Tyrion that he's practically a different character altogether. Tyrion is "[[http://www.sfsite.com/01a/gm95.htm the grayest of the gray]]" in the books, per Creator/GeorgeRRMartin, and partakes in all sorts of horrendous acts including raping slaves and setting loose ravaging barbarians on civilians out of spite, but the show omits or justifies virtually all his less-than-heroic aspects in favour of a more traditional protagonist, who happens to be a DeadpanSnarker on the side.
*** He is almost as egocentrical as his father, openly loves power and authority, and is a bit more concerned with his family's actions from the viewpoint of how it affects their image than the actual morality of those actions. Furthermore, in the books:

to:

** Taken to such extremes with Tyrion that he's practically a different character altogether. Tyrion is "[[http://www.sfsite.com/01a/gm95.htm the grayest of the gray]]" in the books, per Creator/GeorgeRRMartin, and partakes in all sorts of horrendous acts including raping slaves and setting loose ravaging barbarians on civilians out of spite, but the show omits or justifies virtually all his less-than-heroic aspects in favour of a more traditional protagonist, who happens to be a DeadpanSnarker on the side.
side. Furthermore, in the books:
*** He is almost as egocentrical as his father, openly loves power and authority, and is a bit more concerned with his family's actions from the viewpoint of how it affects their image than the actual morality of those actions. Furthermore, in the books:


** Tyrion is "[[http://www.sfsite.com/01a/gm95.htm the grayest of the gray]]" in the books, per Creator/GeorgeRRMartin, but the show omits or justifies virtually all his less-than-heroic aspects in favour of a more traditional protagonist:
*** In the books, he arranges at least two murders, threatens Tommen with any harm (including rape) done to Cersei's hostage, strangles [[spoiler: Shae]] in a crime of passion rather than [[TheDogShotFirst self-defence]], and callously rapes an Essosi SexSlave rather than chatting politely.
*** Even his lesser transgressions like breaking Marillion's fingers for mocking him, arranging a truce-breaking FalseFlagOperation to free Jaime, and disdainfully answering Thorne's petition to aid the Night's Watch by offering a few shovels (to keep the AnimateDead buried, you see) are all omitted, and Shae's adaptational heroism helps turn him from a deluded (and occasionally [[DomesticAbuse abusive]]) john into a genuine lover.
*** Following his exile from Westeros, Tyrion becomes even darker and crueller than he was previously in the books, and tries to join Daenerys on the condition that he can inflict revenge on his family, especially by raping and murdering Cersei. In the show, he never expresses these desires and actually [[TookALevelInKindness takes a level in kindness]] after joining Daenerys as his adviser. When they actually return to Westeros, Tyrion tries his best to have Daenerys' conquest to be clean as possible and still feels sympathy for his relatives, even though they are now his enemies.

to:

** Taken to such extremes with Tyrion that he's practically a different character altogether. Tyrion is "[[http://www.sfsite.com/01a/gm95.htm the grayest of the gray]]" in the books, per Creator/GeorgeRRMartin, and partakes in all sorts of horrendous acts including raping slaves and setting loose ravaging barbarians on civilians out of spite, but the show omits or justifies virtually all his less-than-heroic aspects in favour of a more traditional protagonist:
protagonist, who happens to be a DeadpanSnarker on the side.
*** He is almost as egocentrical as his father, openly loves power and authority, and is a bit more concerned with his family's actions from the viewpoint of how it affects their image than the actual morality of those actions. Furthermore, in the books:
*** In the books, he arranges at least two murders, including having a bard flat-out murdered by Bronn and given to a stew cook in Flea Bottom for threatening to expose Shae, and strangles [[spoiler: Shae]] in a crime of passion as a spiteful act of vengeance for her turning on him during his trial rather than being essentially forced to do it to prevent her from exposing Tywin's death and Shae did the grab the knife first as well, so Tyrion was mainly acting in [[TheDogShotFirst self-defence]].
*** In the books, Tyrion has his hilltribes abduct Tommen when Cersei captures Alayaya (the prostitute Roz filled in for as the one Cersei thought was Tyrion's lover in place of Shae) and he
threatens Tommen with any harm (including rape) done to Cersei's hostage, strangles [[spoiler: Shae]] hostage (although in a crime all fairness, he was bluffing). This is why Tywin is so spiteful when Tyrion awakens from the Battle of passion rather than [[TheDogShotFirst self-defence]], and callously rapes an Essosi SexSlave rather than chatting politely.
Blackwater Tywin heard Tyrion threatened his nephew with bodily harm over a whore.
*** Even his lesser transgressions like breaking Marillion's fingers for mocking him, arranging a truce-breaking FalseFlagOperation to free Jaime, and disdainfully answering Thorne's petition to aid the Night's Watch by offering a few shovels (to keep the AnimateDead buried, you see) are all omitted, and omitted.
*** He unconsciously treats Shae as little more than a slave who has no say in anything outside of the bed. In the show,
Shae's adaptational heroism helps turn him from a deluded (and occasionally [[DomesticAbuse abusive]]) abusive]], though he feels awful about this) john into a genuine lover.
*** In the books he callously rapes an Essosi SexSlave in Volantis, before remarking in his internal monologue "what a horrible little creature I am", rather than a sex slave approach him, offer him consensual sex, and Tyrion politely decline.
*** Following his exile from Westeros, Tyrion becomes even darker and crueller crueler than he was previously in the books, books because of his family's treachery, and tries to join Daenerys on the condition that he can inflict revenge on his family, especially by personally killing Jaime and raping and murdering Cersei. In the show, he never expresses these desires and actually [[TookALevelInKindness takes a level in kindness]] after joining Daenerys as his adviser. When they actually return to Westeros, Tyrion tries his best to have Daenerys' conquest to be clean as possible and still feels sympathy for his relatives, even though they are now his enemies.


* The history and lore adaptation of ''The Dance of the Dragons'' makes Queen Rhaenyra Targaryen's faction more obviously sympathetic and correct than the Greens, with very little attention given to her paranoia, with the issue of her children from her first Velaryon marriage (who were called "Strong" bastards in ''Literature/ArchmaesterGyldaynsHistories'') not being made an issue for the Greens.

to:

* The history and lore adaptation of ''The Dance of the Dragons'' makes Queen Rhaenyra Targaryen's faction more obviously sympathetic and correct than the Greens, with very little attention given to her paranoia, with the issue of her children from her first Velaryon marriage (who were called "Strong" bastards in ''Literature/ArchmaesterGyldaynsHistories'') not being made an issue for the Greens.Greens.
* A lot of impulsive cruel moments are excised from Dany's character in the show. For instance, it is Rakharo not she who confiscates Viserys's horse when he tries to assault her in the long grass; shaming him for the whole khalasar to see. She also never demands her ''kos'' slaughter Qotho for shoving her aside and trying to stop Mirri's healing spell. Nor does she slap Jorah for convincing her to travel to Astapor; or order him on a suicide mission when she discovers his spying. One of the biggest collar-pulling moments though has to be the fact that Show!Dany would never even dream of "putting anyone to the question", let alone the ''daughters'' of a man suspected of collaborating with the Harpies Sons to assassinate her soldiers.


* The history and lore adaptation of ''The Dance of the Dragons'' makes Rhaenyra's faction more obviously sympathetic and correct than the Greens, with very little attention given to her paranoia, with the issue of her children from her first Velaryon marriage (who were called "Strong" bastards in ''Literature/ArchmaesterGyldaynsHistories'') not being made an issue for the Greens.

to:

* The history and lore adaptation of ''The Dance of the Dragons'' makes Rhaenyra's Queen Rhaenyra Targaryen's faction more obviously sympathetic and correct than the Greens, with very little attention given to her paranoia, with the issue of her children from her first Velaryon marriage (who were called "Strong" bastards in ''Literature/ArchmaesterGyldaynsHistories'') not being made an issue for the Greens.


* While Viserys' creepiness is still present, his actual attempts to claim Daenerys's maidenhead are absent in the show and never mentioned by her sister. In the books, Ilyrio has to post guards in her room so Viserys doesn't derail years of planning, ruining the alliance with the Dothraki in a single night.

to:

* While Viserys' creepiness is still present, his actual attempts to claim Daenerys's maidenhead are absent in the show and never mentioned by her sister. In the books, Ilyrio has to post guards in her room so Viserys doesn't derail years of planning, ruining the alliance with the Dothraki in a single night.night.
* The history and lore adaptation of ''The Dance of the Dragons'' makes Rhaenyra's faction more obviously sympathetic and correct than the Greens, with very little attention given to her paranoia, with the issue of her children from her first Velaryon marriage (who were called "Strong" bastards in ''Literature/ArchmaesterGyldaynsHistories'') not being made an issue for the Greens.


* Take the term with a ''huge'' grain of salt, but long after Joffrey's death the show finally gets around to revealing that unlike in the books, it was Littlefinger rather than Joffrey who arranged the attack on Bran after Jaime pushed him off the tower.

to:

* Take the term with a ''huge'' grain of salt, but long after Joffrey's death the show finally gets around to revealing that unlike in the books, it was Littlefinger rather than Joffrey who arranged the attack on Bran after Jaime pushed him off the tower.tower.
* While Viserys' creepiness is still present, his actual attempts to claim Daenerys's maidenhead are absent in the show and never mentioned by her sister. In the books, Ilyrio has to post guards in her room so Viserys doesn't derail years of planning, ruining the alliance with the Dothraki in a single night.


----
*"Heroism" is entirely the wrong word, but the show lightens Ramsay's behavior compared to the books (not that this is very hard).

to:

----
*"Heroism"
* "Heroism" is entirely the wrong word, but the show lightens Ramsay's behavior compared to the books (not that this is very hard).



** In the books, Ramsay forcibly marries Donella Hornwood to claim her family's holdings, and then rapes her and locks her in a tower to starve to death. Show Ramsay does no such thing.

to:

** In the books, Ramsay forcibly marries Donella Hornwood to claim her family's holdings, and then rapes her and locks her in a tower to starve to death. Show Ramsay does no such thing.thing.
* Take the term with a ''huge'' grain of salt, but long after Joffrey's death the show finally gets around to revealing that unlike in the books, it was Littlefinger rather than Joffrey who arranged the attack on Bran after Jaime pushed him off the tower.


* House Lannister. While Cersei or Tywin never exactly make it to 'heroic', Tyrion arguably was there even in the books and Jaime is... Jaime, all of them get somehow polished, or at least made to appear more humane in the show. After all, we get to see them so often that is better if we care about the characters to some degree. To balance it out, Joffrey is made even nastier in the show than he was in the book.

to:

* House Lannister. While Cersei or Tywin never exactly make it to 'heroic', Tyrion arguably was there even in the books and Jaime is... Jaime, all of them get somehow polished, or at least made to appear more humane in the show. After all, we get to see them so often that is better if we care about the characters to some degree. To balance it out, Joffrey is made even nastier in the show than he was in the book.books.



* Catelyn is unpleasant to Jon in the show but doesn't go so far as to declare YouShouldHaveDiedInstead or refuse to let him stay at Winterfell after Ned leaves. She even laments her treatment of Jon as a failing in the show, rather than adamantly opposing Robb's trust in Jon throughout, as in the books. [[labelnote: From the books...]]In the books, some of Catelyn's resentment stems from fears Ned loved and continues to love Jon's mother more than her due to Ned's fierce protectiveness of Jon. She states she would have forgiven Ned a dozen illegitimate kids but resents that Jon is never out of sight as Ned brought Jon home to Winterfell as a baby, had him and his wet nurse take up residence in Winterfell before her arrival with Robb, and raised Jon alongside their trueborn children. Catelyn's resentment also comes from fears that any children Jon may have will pose a threat to the succession rights of her own grandchildren, making her very relieved when Jon joins the Night's Watch because of the Watch's oath to bear no children. When Robb wants to name Jon his heir, Catelyn opposes his decision, telling Robb that while he trusts Jon, she believes his descendants might overthrow Robb's descendants. Catelyn's beliefs against illegitimate children are due to negative Westerosi prejudice against them, referencing only negative cases of illegitimate-born individuals (the Blackfyre rebellion) and dismisses those who were true and loyal (Addam Velaryon, Brynden Rivers).[[/labelnote]]

to:

* Catelyn is unpleasant to Jon in the show but doesn't go so far as to declare YouShouldHaveDiedInstead or refuse to let him stay at Winterfell after Ned leaves. She even laments her treatment of Jon as a failing in the show, rather than adamantly opposing Robb's trust in Jon throughout, as in the books. [[labelnote: From the books...]]In the books, some of Catelyn's resentment stems from fears Ned loved and continues to love Jon's mother more than her due to Ned's fierce protectiveness of Jon. She states she would have forgiven Ned a dozen illegitimate kids as long as they were out of sight, but resents that Jon is never out of sight as Ned brought Jon home to Winterfell as a baby, had him and his wet nurse take up residence in Winterfell before her arrival with Robb, and raised Jon alongside their trueborn children. Catelyn's resentment also comes from fears that any children Jon may have will pose a threat to the succession rights of her own grandchildren, making her very relieved when Jon joins the Night's Watch because of the Watch's oath to bear no children. When Robb wants to name Jon his heir, Catelyn opposes his decision, telling Robb that while he trusts Jon, she believes his descendants might overthrow Robb's descendants. Catelyn's beliefs against illegitimate children are due to negative Westerosi prejudice against them, referencing only negative cases of illegitimate-born individuals (the Blackfyre rebellion) and dismisses dismissing those who were true and loyal (Addam Velaryon, Brynden Rivers).[[/labelnote]]

Showing 15 edit(s) of 62

Top