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YMMV: Hell Girl

  • Angst: Yuzuki Mikage does some internal angsting midway through the series. This is because she's being used as a Soul Jar by Ai Enma and she's unable to do anything about it. Oh, and she's going to be taking Ai's place soon. Neither of the two are at all pleasant things. What seperates this from annoying whining is that Yuzuki actually tries to defy Ai and is determined to change her fate. Doesn't work though.
  • Crowning Music of Awesome: Jigoku Rock, which plays whenever someone's being taken to Hell. And the remixes. And Mitsuganae gives us Jigoku Death Metal!
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: The series can easily fall into this as it goes on, especially the first season. The person with the doll is always going to pull the string and damn both themselves and their tormentor. Even the introduction of someone trying to put a stop to it doesn't help when he constantly fails at it. The only time this is ever averted is in the final episode.
  • Epileptic Trees: Contrary to popular expectation derived from a Mythology Gag, Gilles de L'Enfer does not make an appearance in Mitsuganae. At all. The Other Wiki's article spent a good few months setting him up to return as the main villain, but then...
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: Plenty of them, including the lesson Enma Ai herself learns: Don't ever stick out your neck for anyone. You'll just wind up being condemned.
  • Fridge Horror: Occurs when you realize that even the most sympathetic of string pullers just did the mystical equivalent of hiring a hitman when they seal the deal with Hell Girl.
    • Even more so when you realize that those string pullers have at most a few decades before they experience the same horrible suffering as their tormentors for eternity. After the first century in Hell, chances are they will not think that deal was worth it.
      • Then again, it's Asian Hell, which means the suffering will only feel like eternity. They will suffer for the duration of their sins and then reincarnate. Those who had the utmost minor of sins will probably only be there for a few days or something.
    • What happened to Kaoruko Kurushima, the actress in the first season who was attacked and fed a chemical that destroyed her voice. It's entirely possible that the thugs who did this to her didn't stop at removing her ability to call for help. It also doesn't help that the setting of this attack is in a dark alleyway at night.
  • Growing the Beard: Each series starts off with the Once an Episode someone going to hell thing, until the main story picks up midway through the series.
  • Ho Yay: The entirety of the fourth episode of Mitsuganae. Yukawa is clearly having a relationship with Nishida. The infamous 'speck of dust in the eye' scene all but practically confirms it.
  • Les Yay: Early in the first episode of Mitsuganae, Ai Enma appears in front of Hone Onna, licks a moist cherry and smiles in a rather seductive manner. The two are probably not gay, but there's a lot of Les Yay subtext there.
    • Also in the first episode, when Ai Enma makes Yuzuki Mikage susceptible to her Demonic Possession. It involved a hug and a kiss, while naked, in a bathtub.
      • And she kisses Yuzuki again at the end of the season, to show her her past. Seeing as Ai showed her past to both Tsugumi and Hajime before without having to kiss them, one can only imagine why she decide to show it that way...
    • What about Honne-Onna's diehard fangirls? One was ready to send someone to hell because she tought he was dating her! And another actually sent the other girl to hell because she thought she got too close to Onna!
      • Also, when that student with a crush on Hone Onna is sent to hell, Ai & Co. stage a triathlon with Hone Onna's love as a prize. Though it is just an act, Ai acts as one of the competitors.
  • Moral Event Horizon: If someone is sent to hell, chances are that he or she crossed it. The townsfolk of a city in the ending of the second season are a MAJOR example; making contracts left and right for the most stupid reasons and blaming it all on a little boy, whose life become a living hell.
    • Ditto for Ayaka from episode 7 of the first season. She plans to send her adoptive mother to Hell simply because she pushes Ayaka too hard as a theater coach. But then everything changes when another girl, Kaoruko, is chosen for the role Ayaka wanted, and Ayaka begins tormenting her instead, coming to a head when she hires a couple of thugs to force-feed Kaoruko a chemical that destroys her voice, possibly permanently. In the end, it's Kaoruko who sends Ayaka to hell, but Ayaka is not the least bit remorseful for what she did, even claiming she never cared about acting and that she was only ever in it to get what she wanted - notably her adoptive mother's fame and fortune. Her voyage to hell was not pretty, to say the least.
    • Ai nearly crosses (or possibly crosses it just from the attempt) it too in the first season's finale by trying to manipulate Tsugumi into sending her dad to Hell and using Tsugumi's memories of her mother's death to do so. Fortunately, Tsugumi says no in the end, and Ai then stops doing so.
    • Whether or not the person sent to hell crossed the horizon, anyone who actually does send someone to hell crosses it pretty much de facto.
  • Narm: Some of the third season's getting sent to hell process falls into this territory.
  • Nightmare Fuel: Third season, when Yamawaro gets fungus-juice applied to his back, which then grows a patches of mushrooms on his back. May also be counted as Squick.
    • Some of the going-to-hell sequences (Episodes 1 and 17 of Futakomori come to mind) fit this to a T.
    • The second episode of the first season centers on a teenage girl who is the victim of a stalker, which can be horribly uncomfortable for anyone who's ever been in a similar situation.
    • A chapter in the manga's third incarnation is about a girl being harassed by a postman through her late grandmother's parrot. It somehow still stays scary despite the premise.
  • Paranoia Fuel: You could be sent to Hell for anything, at any given time. Seriously, you might not even remember doing anything bad, you could not have done anything bad at all, but somehow, someone is pissed off at you. And you'll be minding your own business one minute, and being boated off to Hell in the next...
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped: Two of them. Number one, even if someone is tormenting you, it is not worth sending them to Hell if the price is joining him/her someday. Number two, although this one's more implied throughout the series than directly stated, Japanese society needs to be sharply critiqued if it cannot consistently restrain tormentors from hurting others in the first place.
  • What an Idiot: The first and ninth episodes of the third season, especially.
    • In the first, a girl gets mad and tries to get rid of a teacher who is only doing his job and trying to help her succeed and stay out of trouble. He even takes away her mp3 player because she was listening to it instead of the lesson. If she had a single bit of sense, this girl would've just taken that as a lesson - save the music and doodling for when class is over. She eventually sends him to hell... and finds out that he was doodling in the notebook he always carried, rather than writing about her and her friends. The worst part is, the teacher didn't really throw away the mp3 player like he said he had - he had given it to one of the other students and told her to give it back to the owner. Lesson learned too late.
    • In the ninth, a wannabe fortune-teller gets a lucky streak and gets to be popular, then the Alpha Bitch who had previously poked fun at her started sucking up and told her to send some guy who was allegedly stalking her to hell. She tries several methods, worrying that her client would expose her as a fake, and then finally uses the Hell Correspondence site to send him to hell. She doesn't even wait for Ai to finish her speech and warn her of the consequences. The next morning, her client tells her that she lied about him and only wanted him dead because he was disgusting. The look of horror on her face is priceless. What's worse is, she never attempted to find out why her spirit-guide Gon-San was not cursing this man; if he did exist, and he was her 'protector' as she said, it's likely that he was trying to keep her from being used and from having the blood of an innocent on her hands.
    • If you think about it, this one applies to just about EVERYONE. Anyone who doesn't throw the doll away after Enma gives her warning is a stone cold idiot.
  • The Woobie: Being a rather depressing show, there are quite a few.
    • Takuma, who probably wasn't even a teenager yet, goes through a lot of crap. So much so that even Ai could not resist saving him from hell, at the cost of her own life.
    • Yuzuki, it's tough knowing people around you are going to hell and you can do nothing about it. And losing your best friend in the most spontaneous circumstance, and then realise all your life have been an illusion. And then we get to see her backstory and how she was dead all along...
    • Ai herself, buried alive by the one person she trusted, she lived 500 years with this hatred. Forced to condemn others to grant her own parents a way to heaven. She doesn't enjoy it, she has emotions, but she will just have to repress them and continue to do her job indefinitely.
    • With its episodic nature, many woobies can pop up in one episode or another depending on the story.
  • Woolseyism: The 7th episode of the dub has Caitlin Glass's character cussing for the entire episode.


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