Trivia / Quest for Camelot

  • Actor Allusion:
    • Possibly unintentional, but Gary Oldman's character Ruber (an obvious villain) is very similar to Dr. Smith, another obvious villain played by Oldman. It helps that both films came out in the same year.
    • The song "If I Didn't Have You" has got the line "You'd be extinct, you'd cease to be", sung by Devon, voiced by Eric Idle.
    • Cary Elwes' voice work as Garret definitely evokes his performance as Westley in The Princess Bride, right down to a shot between him and Kayley that resembles that film's poster.
  • All-Star Cast: A big part of the voice cast were pretty big names.
    • The singers were no slouches either. Andrea Corr for Kayley or CÚline Dion for Lady Juliana are the best examples.
    • Even the non-English versions got pretty big names and talented voice actors and singers from each respective country. See the Your Mileage May Vary entry for details.
  • Box Office Bomb: Despite the schedule change to open away from any other animated film, Quest For Camelot still failed due to negative reviews and comparisons to Anastasia, The Little Mermaid (which was reissued in theaters that November), and Mulan, and was devoured by Godzilla (1998), losing Warner Bros. about $40,000,000 (which was exactly the film's budget - it only made $22,510,798 domestically and contributed to Warner Animation's shuttering its doors until The LEGO Movie brought it Back from the Dead 16 years later).
  • Breakaway Pop Hit: Few people realize that "The Prayer" was initially written for an unsuccessful animated film. Likewise, "Looking Through Your Eyes" was a surprisingly big radio hit relative to its origins, although it has mostly faded into obscurity since the film came out.
  • Creator Killer:
    • Quest For Camelot did not set a high enough bar for Warner Animation to test themselves with, and was the first of a string of bombs that led to the studio's closure until it was resurrected in The New Tens.
    • Frederik Du Chau, who is the one who made the call to turn the film into a Disney-clone musical, did not direct another film for 7 years, and one of the writers, Kirk De Micco, had that exact same hiatus; both worked on Racing Stripes, but De Micco went to DreamWorks Animation and did The Croods, while Du Chau is in the C-list of animators.
    • Both this film and the next one from Warner, The King and I, also liquidated the career of another one of the writers, David Seidler, as he never worked on another film until 2010.
  • Dueling Movies: With Disney's Mulan, which also has a heroine trying to get out of a traditionally female role and join the battlefield, fighting against her country's sexist traditions. Disney prevailed yet again, and this did not help Warner's business at all.
  • Executive Meddling:
    • The film was originally going to be directed by Bill and Susan Kroyer, the husband-and-wife team behind FernGully: The Last Rainforest, and the film was originally meant to be a much darker, more faithful adaptation of the book.. However, when Frederik Du Chau came to the director's chair, he overhauled the storyline and turned it from a dark and faithful story into an very loose Disney-esqe musical just to compete with Disney. It didn't do well at the box-office. What an Idiot, indeed! The move banished his career to the B and C lists in the end for it.
    • Before the executives were through meddling, some main characters were renamed after their children. Kayley was originally Lynette in the book — as in Arthurian legend.
    • Heck, it wasn't even going to be a musical! All of the songs were written in the later stages of the film's production.
  • Fake Brit: Canadian-born Jessalyn Gilsig as Kayley. Her attempt at a British accent slips a couple of times.
  • Genre-Killer:
    • This film, one of countless Disney-copycats at the time, is sometimes seen as a sign that The Renaissance Age of Animation was coming to an end, and is an especially easy target for the downfall of traditionally animated features in America towards the end of this era.
    • It was also a sign that the animated musical was about to go into hibernation; this was one of a slew of animated musicals, with DreamWorks doing their own with Prince of Egypt. It didn't take long for DWA to crush the genre and supplant Warner as Disney's top Arch-Enemy on the back of films like this.
  • Name's the Same: Not the only Forbidden Forest out there.
  • Non-Singing Voice: Most of the cast, possibly because this wasn't initially written as a musical, so whether a given performer could sing would not have been a concern at the time he/she was cast. In addition, some of the original actors can sing, but it's possible that the songs were added in so late that either the contracts were already set in stone or the actors were no longer available.
    • The vocal differences between speaking and singing voice actors are especially noticeable. For example, Kayley gains a very clear Irish lilt (provided by Andrea Corr) when she starts singing.
  • Not Even Bothering with the Accent: Don Rickles as Cornwall makes absolutely no attempt to hide his American accent, unlike the other few American actors who worked on this film.
  • Old Shame: None of the animators who worked on this movie like it. Lauren Faust, whose staunch feminist philosophies are a complete 180 from this film's Values Dissonance even in 1998, has been particularly brutal to it in recent years.note 
  • Schedule Slip: The film was meant to open for Christmas 1997, but was pushed back to May 1998 to avoid serious competition with Don Bluth's Anastasia, James Cameron's Titanic (1997), and a reissue of The Little Mermaid. Ultimately, it didn't help much.
  • What Could Have Been: The film was originally intended to be darker, edgier and generally a more serious adventure as it was based on a very dark and serious book, The King's Damsel, before being retooled into a more family-friendly Disney-style production just to compete with Disney.

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