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Theatre: Blood Brothers
Tell me it's not true
Say it's just a story...

Blood Brothers is a musical written by playwright Willy Russell, about twin brothers—Mickey and Eddie—who are separated at birth by their mother, Mrs. Johnstone, who can't afford to raise them both, and her barren employer Mrs. Lyons. They are brought up in two vastly different environments, on opposite ends of the social spectrum. As children, they meet and become best friends, never finding out they are brothers until the day of their untimely demise.

Russell is not a trained musician at all, but wanted to write a musical to call his own, and wanted it to be purely his, not a collaboration. Sure enough, it has become one of the most popular and long-running shows in West End history.


This musical contains examples of:
  • Anti-Love Song: "I'm Not Saying A Word", Eddie's song to Linda about how he's not going to tell her how he feels about her. It takes a seriously skilled actor to make this song work.
  • Arc Words: "Shoes Upon the Table".
  • Blood Brothers: Right there in the title. When Mickey and Eddie meet as children, they decide to become Blood Brothers to solidify their best friend-ship.
  • Cannot Spit It Out: Mickey, in the first part of Act 2
  • Catch Phrase: "Now you know the Devil's got your number", anybody?
  • Dark Reprise: While "Shoes Upon the Table" is already a very dark song to begin with, the Narrator returns every now and then to reprise it, with somewhat different lyrics, as the brothers' lives comes closer and closer to ending, until he reaches the final reprise, "Madman", when, as he says, "[The Devil]'s calling your number up TODAY".
    • Another example is the song "Marilyn Monroe". The first time it's sung, it's Mrs Johnson who's described as being sexy "Just like Marilyn Monroe". That continues in the second reprise. However, the final reprise is sung more slowly and this time it's Micky who's tablet taking and depression is described as being "Just like Marilyn Monroe".
  • Dawson Casting: Mickey and Eddie are depicted from the age of seven to into their early twenties, all by the same actor. Typically, the actors are cast at the oldest end of the spectrum. The same thing applies to their mutual love interest Linda and elder brother Sammy, who are of similar ages.
  • Deal with the Devil: The agreement Mrs. Johnstone makes with Ms. Lyon is explictedly compared to a deal with the devil, with "Shoes Upon the Table" emphasizing how the price will eventually come due.
  • Disappeared Dad: The opening number explains how Mr. Johnstone walked out on his wife.
  • Downer Ending
  • Dramatic Irony: The show lives off it.
  • Epic Rocking: "Tell Me It's Not True".
  • Ethereal Choir: Used to hauntingly beautiful effect in the Overture.
  • Famous Last Words: "I could have been him!"
  • Foregone Conclusion: As noted elsewhere on the page, it's revealed right at the beginning of the play that Mickey and Eddie end up dead; the story's in how that happened.
  • Gender-Neutral Narrator
  • Girl Next Door: Linda
  • How We Got Here: The first scene has the two brothers lying dead.
  • Inherently Funny Words: 'Tit'. At one point, after seeing a dirty picture with Mickey, Eddie keeps giddily repeating it over and over.
  • Interactive Narrator: Depending on the direction for a given production, the Narrator of this show can be played similar to this.
  • Law of Inverse Fertility: Mrs. Lyons wants nothing more than her own child, but they can't concieve and her husband refuses to adopt. Mrs. Johnstone, meanwhile, has "seven hungry mouths to feed and one more nearly due."
  • Love Triangle: Type 7 between Mickey, Eddie, and Linda. She ends up marrying Mickey after he knocks her up, whilst Eddie is away at university. When Mickey is arrested and becomes a pill-popping mental case, Linda turns to Eddie for help and comfort, and the two begin a chaste pseudo-affair.
  • Lyrical Dissonance: "Take A Letter, Miss Jones", a bright, upbeat, happy song sung by Mr. Lyons the factory manager as he dictates letters to his secretary, each of which fires another employee. Then he fires her.
  • Meaningful Name: Johnston is a rather common surname in England, emphasising the family's lower-class status, but the variation makes it seem down to earth (stone). Meanwhile, Lyons invokes the image of a pride of lions, and pride is definitely something Mrs. Lyons values heavily.
  • Miles Gloriosus: While trying to impress Eddie, Mickey and Linda claim that they always Troll the cops with obviously fake answers and rude responses. Once a copper approaches them later, Eddie acts that way while his friends freak out.
  • My Beloved Smother: Mrs. Lyons, as if to compensate for the fact Eddie isn't really her son. This is especially the case when it comes to Mrs. Johnstone and Mickey, who she worries are going to try to steal Eddie back.
  • No Medication for Me: While Mickey wants to stay on his meds, they're encouraged to quit by Linda and his mother.
  • Oop North: Liverpool, to be exact.
  • Opening Chorus: "Overture".
  • Parental Abandonment: Subverted in that Mrs. Johnstone wants to continue to be part of Eddie's life at first, but Mrs. Lyons won't let her.
  • The Power of Blood
  • Punctuated! For! Emphasis!: "But a debt is a debt... AND MUST. BE. PAID."
  • Sanity Slippage: Mrs. Lyons. Crosses with a bit of Laser-Guided Karma, as she becomes even more superstitious than Mrs. Johnstone along the way.
  • Sanity Slippage Song: Presented as children singing about how "High up on the hill there's a woman gone MAD!"
  • Separated at Birth
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: Despite being gender-neutral, the Narrator pretty much is always dressed in a black suit.
  • She Is All Grown Up: Linda
  • Shotgun Wedding: Mr. and Mrs. Johnstone, and Mickey and Linda.
  • Sibling Triangle
  • Spirit Advisor: In some productions, The Narrator, though it's usually played that he is on nobody's side.
  • Taking the Heat: Mickey does this for Sammy.
  • Those Wacky Nazis: "Sonny's a Nazi!"
  • Threat Backfire: When Ms. Lyons starts changing the deal on her, Mrs. Johnstone threatens to go to the police. Lyons shoots back that Johnstone will be in far more trouble for 'selling her son'.
  • A Touch of Class, Ethnicity and Religion: Well, the first one anyway. The show draws very strong, very blatant parallels between the working and upper-middle class families.
    And do we blame superstition for what came to pass, or could it be what we the English have come to know as class?
  • Troll: The Narrator can come off as this, especially in his interactions with Mrs. Lyons - see Gypsies in the Wood and Secrets in particular.
  • Troubled, but Cute: Mickey.
  • Two Guys and a Girl: Mickey, Eddie, and Linda.
  • Villain Song: Depending on the production, "Shoes Upon the Table" can be played this way.
  • Your Cheating Heart: As her marriage flounders, Linda seeks comfort from Eddie. Exactly how sexual their relationship becomes after Mickey goes off the rails depends on the play; in some productions it's a full-blown affair, in others it's Like Brother and Sister from Linda's point of view, and Mickey's mental state is driving him to suspect things that aren't there.


Billy ElliotThe MusicalBloody Bloody Andrew Jackson
An Inspector CallsSchool Study MediaAnton Chekhov

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