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Stock Sitcom Grand Finale
Sitcoms can be formulaic. Often this applies not only to regular episodes but to the Grand Finale. One would generally think that the writers would want to pull out all the stops and get creative to create a truly one-of-a-kind ending to the show that their fans have been following all this time. However, that's not always the case.

It goes like this: At the end of the final episode all the main cast are standing in the living room. It's quite likely (but not required) that the family or at least some of the main characters is moving, indicating that this is the last time they'll be together in this place. They have a touching conversation about all the good times they've had (levels of Narm may vary here). Bonus points if they hang a lampshade on a Running Gag or Hand Wave a bit of Fridge Logic that fans have been puzzling over. Then all the main cast exit through the main door. One person (generally, the main character) pauses in the doorway, takes a long, soulful look around the room, then slowly turns to follow the others. The camera will either linger on the closed door or pan slowly across the room.

It's easy to see why this kind of ending is popular - the Real Life cast and crew behind each show is usually overcome with emotion at having to say goodbye, which therefore bleeds into their performance. At the same time, it's a chance to provide audiences - who have been inviting these characters into their living rooms on a weekly basis for many years - with some valuable catharsis, and a chance to say "goodbye" to their old friends; even though most popular sitcoms invariably enter syndication (and, in more recent years, are available on DVD), this is still the closest these characters will get to closure, and there will at least be no new episodes after this.

Variations include:
  • A Flashback to the first episode (or to when the characters first met, often in a different time period, like in high school or afterwards).
  • The characters move away. Character arcs finally have their ending (usually it's characters telling others how they really feel about them), and just before someone leaves, he or she either shuts the lights off or takes with him or her a special momento. Can be Played for Laughs if another character is still in the house and realizes that he or she has been left behind (often yelling, "Hey, wait for me!" or "Hello? I'm still here!")
  • Two unlikely characters (particularly those who have been established as enemies or Vitriolic Best Friends) decide to become friends, or, at the very least, realize that they're not as different as they think.
  • A review of notable moments in the series. It may be a Montage or Fully Automatic Clip Show lasting a few minutes, or possibly the whole episode can be a traditional Clip Show.

This is a sub-trope of Grand Finale

Examples

  • Not a sitcom, but Babylon 5 had creator JMS play a caretaker character who turned off the lights on the entire station before it blew up.
  • The Barney Miller finale ends with Barney looking around the now-abandoned squadroom, stopping at various desks to reminisce about long-departed characters (shown via old clips), and then turning out the lights.
  • Boy Meets World had a variation. The main characters who were moving said goodbye to the family at the house, and then went to the classroom to finish it up with Mr. Feeny (and it is he, not Cory, who delivers the final lines and is the last to leave the room).
  • Cheers had Sam stay behind to close the bar. Instead of leaving through the front door, he walks to the back.
  • The Cosby Show switched things up a bit. At the end of the show, Cliff fixes the previously broken doorbell as it rings a snazzy jazz tune. Cliff and Claire promptly start dancing along, and then the two actors walk off the set and out of the studio to a standing ovation.
  • Parodied in the season 1 finale of Community.
  • An episode of Quebecer show Dans une galaxie près de chez vous had such a scene before everyone disembarked the ship, with the captain lingering behind. But then they all got back on board and left again on the ship instead of staying on the planet.
  • The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air ended with Will taking one last look at the empty living room and then turning off the lights, while Carlton was still using the bathroom upstairs.
  • Friends ended with Chandler and Monica leaving the apartment the gang spent most of their time in. The episode ended with a shot of the empty apartment. And the last line is a joke about the coffee house where they hung out daily, and was the setting of the opening scene of the show.
  • Full House had the entire cast sharing the narmy conversation in the living room (including bringing in Steve as a Call Back), but faded to black without showing the cast exit. Instead, a Curtain Call was performed during the credits of the original broadcast.
  • Growing Pains
  • Happy Days, rather oddly, ends with Howard Cunningham interrupting Joanie and Chachi's wedding to thank the viewers directly for "being part of our family" (and, in a famous outtake, Howard realizes that his son Chuck hasn't been seen since season one).
  • Home Improvement, with the entire family (minus Randy) sitting around the living room, preparing to leave it for the last time, and flashing back to various episodes. That is, unless they really did go ahead with Tim's plan to move the entire house to Bloomington.
  • "The IT Crowd" ends precisely like this, with all three cast members heading out the room, Roy giving his signature line one last time ("Oh, just turn it off and on again") and Moss giving one last look at the room before flicking the light switch. However, when the credits seemingly begin to roll in complete silence, it immediately rewinds and restarts with a fake commercial for the new Reynholm Industries under the management of the former I.T. department, accompanied by the show's theme.
  • The end of The Mary Tyler Moore Show had the cast (who were all fired from the station, except Ted Baxter) in a group hug, then one by one they left the office while singing "It's a long way to Tipperary." Mary was the last one out, took a look, and turned off the lights. Then the stars came out for one final curtain call. Note that, as the oldest entry on this list (the series finale aired in 1977), this is also the Trope Maker.
    • Homaged/parodied in the finale to The Bob Newhart Show the following year, which had the cast embracing and then singing the theme from Oklahoma!.
  • Moesha also had the "door close" ending with the closing of The Den.
  • Mystery Science Theater 3000 uses this, but not as the final shot. In Danger: Diabolik, the great experiment is finally and definitively ending, so Pearl, Observer, and Bobo pack their belongings, line up new careers, and prepare to go their separate ways. In the final host segment, they're hugging and singing together in the now-vacant Castle Forrester; Pearl turns to the camera and says "Move on, Mike. We have," before disconnecting it. However, the episode then returns to Mike and the robots, and ends with a Time Skip to show Where Are They Now.
  • The Nanny has Fran looking at the make-up case she carried in the first episode with a montage of clips from the series before making the slow exit. Then she comes back in and opens the bathroom door to get Yetta.
  • NewsRadio had Mr. James retiring and setting up a new station in New Hampshire. He asks Dave for one employee to take with him, and Dave without hesitation choses Matthew. The others feel sorry for Matthew and one by one they all join Jimmy. The episode ends with Dave alone at WNYX ...except for Matthew, who secretly stayed behind. It is implied that Dave later went with the others to get away from Matthew.
  • Nintendo Power set its final Nester comic in the room where Nester keeps old Nintendo memorabilia, including a complete collection of Nintendo Power magazines. After he and his son have a heartfelt discussion about coping with the magazine's discontinuation, they leave to play New Super Mario Bros. U, and Nester turns off the lights with a bittersweet smile on his face.
  • Red vs. Blue pops up as a web example, with Church finding himself in a memory of the first episode, waiting for Tex to find her way back to him.
  • Scrubs parodies this idea in one of JD's daydreams, although it wasn't the finale, in which JD imagines leaving the hospital like they do at the end of sitcoms. He looks around and turns out the light just before going out the door, which turns out all the electricity in the entire hospital, causing a big panic as all the life support and vital equipment stopped working.
  • The final episode of Seinfeld was a two-parter that tried to incorporate as many previous guest stars as they could, and ended with the cast in jail, repeating dialogue from the first episode, and then Lampshading it.
  • That '70s Show ends with a shot of the empty Forman basement, after the kids head upstairs to ring in the New Year with the parents. We hear the voices counting down the final seconds of 1979, followed by an abrupt cut to a shot of the show's license plate title logo (now sporting a 1980 tag) and then the closing credits.
  • Not a TV show, but the X-Men Spin-Off Generation X ended with each of the kids leaving the Massachusetts Academy as their respective rides came, Emma Frost seemingly returning to villainy as she leaves for parts unknown, and Banshee locking up the abandoned school behind him.
  • Sorta a variant with Frasier, the finale sees him telling a fellow plane passenger about his choice to leave for another job and we get a flashback leading up to this with a few past clips. The final shot sees Fraiser giving a goodbye to his listeners (as well as the viewers) as the staff of his radio station as well as his friends and family look on on in the background.
  • The last scene filmed for M*A*S*H was not from the finale, but rather the penultimate episode aired. In it, the staff put together a time capsule full of meaningful items, gazing at each other with barely-dry eyes...
  • Not a sitcom, but Weeds ends with a million callbacks to the pilot episode "You Can't Miss the Bear" but especially the final scene where Nancy sits alone on the steps and slowly other cast members join her and share a joint. The two songs "With Arms Outstretched" and "The Doodlin' Song" are both used at the vary end of the episode just as they were in the pilot.
  • Both The Office (US) and The Office (UK) ended after a Time Skip, showing how the airing of the show had affected every character's life. Interestingly, while the UK version both ended with the main protagonists finding success in love (Tim finally gets a kiss from Dawn, David founds a woman who actually likes him), the American version ends with the remaining protagonists finding success in business (Jim leaves for Philadelphia to rejoin his successful sports business, Dwight finally ascends to regional manager for good).
Stock Series FinalesEnding TropesStorming the Castle

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