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Rolling Pin of Doom

The rolling pin as a weapon, often aimed at someone's head. Most often wielded by a cook, or else a woman (especially of the Apron Matron persuasion).

An Improbable Weapon, though one that does have reasonable efficacy. Closely related to the Frying Pan of Doom and often used in conjunction with it. Note that most of these rolling pins are made of wood, as plastic is usually too light to do any damage.

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Comic Books 
  • In Marvel Adventures Spider-Man #56, Chat hits Dagger with a rolling pin.
  • Chachi Bini, the wife of famous Indian comic character, Chacha Chaudhary, always has a rolling pin (belan) in her hand. She often uses it as a weapon against thieves and robbers.
  • In Marvel Comics Presents ALF Issue #8, it is subverted in his own What If? : ALF, after being chased by Raquel Ochmonek for his mischief, ALF lampshades that he's lucky that The Comics Code Authority had her throwing a feather-duster, not a rolling pin, which Trevor Ochmonek agreed wholeheartedly... since it him instead!
  • Monica's Gang had a Romeo and Juliet parody featuring Jimmy Five as Romeo and Monica as Juliet. Friar Smudge told Romeo Jimmy the marriage would be so Monicapulet would stop hitting them with that bunny. Jimmy was interested until Smudge showed a rolling pin and told Jimmy that's what wives hit their husbands with.
  • Suske en Wiske: Tante Sidonia uses rolling pins often to defend herself.
  • Nero: Madam Pheip and Madam Nero's favorite weapon of defense.

    Film 

    Jokes 
  • For some reason, this trope is extremely common in Russian jokes (often overlapping with the Frying Pan of Doom), the common scenario being a husband coming home late (and often drunk) to get hit over his head by one. For example:
    • Two women are talking:
      Masha, can I borrow your rolling pin for a couple hours?
      Sorry, neighbor, I'm still waiting for my own drunkard.
    • A women calls a shop:
      Hello? My husband gave me for a present a kitchen kit he bought from you, but the rolling pin is missing!
    • A totally drunk husband returns home late. His wife meets him at the door, holding a rolling pin. He tries to give her a hug:
      My little worker bee... at this hour, and you are still baking.

    Literature 
  • In Howls Moving Castle (the book) there was a brief mention of "angry aunts with rolling pins" coming after Howl.
  • In the Gordon Korman series Island, the one brother and sister hospitalised one another on Halloween night. She was a chef armed with a marble rolling pin. We're not told what he was carrying.
  • Lampshaded - but not used - in Monstrous Regiment.
  • An Ogden Nash poem describes a cartoonist whose life was a stream of classic comic strip tropes. When his wife finally had enough of it all, she naturally used a rolling pin to do him in.

    Live Action TV 

    Music 
  • Vince Gill's "One More Last Chance" describes a woman coming after her husband with a rolling pin and a Bible: "If you don't listen to my preachin', boy / I'm gonna have to beat you half to death."

    Newspaper Comics 
  • A standby in the Andy Capp newspaper comic since 1957.
  • In Sappo, by Popeye creator Segar, John Sappo is always in danger of being bopped by his wife, and several strips involve his attempts to circumvent this. In one arc, he constructs a series of special, protective cages to wear, made of transparent metal, so his wife can't see what's stopping the rolling pin. He then sells several of these cages to other henpecked husbands, much to Mrs. Sappo's confusion. ("He's selling nothing and getting money for it!")

    Theatre 
  • From Oliver!: "Only it's wise to be handy with a rolling pin when the landlord comes to call!"

    Video Games 
  • In the arcade game Dragon's Lair II: The Time Warp, during the first levek, Dirk is pursued, after the kidnapping of Daphne, by his irate mother-in-law, who is wielding a rolling pin.
  • This item in World of Warcraft.
  • Filomena of Urban Rivals wields a rolling pin.
  • Fallout 3
    • Several rolling pins can be found in the Wastelands, likely as a gag weapon.
    • They are also in Fallout: New Vegas... even going as far as including a street gang consisting of old ladies equipped with rolling pins that ambush you in an alley.
  • You can have one in Runescape as a weapon.
  • In the murder mystery game The Ship, this is a possible murder weapon for you to use (or to have used on you)
  • A few enchanted rolling pins can be found in Neverwinter Nights 2.
  • In Paper Boy, a woman chases you with one of these.
  • In MediEvil, there are brainwashed women in the sleeping village that chase Daniel around with these. Unfortunately, he can't fight back, as they are essentially innocent people and killing them will cost him pieces of the Chalice.
  • This is one weapon that Greenies use in Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon. (Mostly in the kitchen of the Gloomy Manor, a place you'd likely expect to find a rolling pin; they tend to use weapons that fit the place they're in.)
  • In The Bourne Conspiracy (the video game based on The Bourne Identity), one of the enemies on Wombosi's ship kitchen will use a rolling pin to fight you in hand-to-hand combat.
  • You can wield one in Ultima VI. It's half as effective as a common knife.

    Western Animation 
  • Perhaps most famous in The Flintstones — Wilma does occasionally throw one.
  • Courage the Cowardly Dog. Muriel almost always whacks Eustace in the head with her rolling pin after he has finished scaring Courage.
  • In Tom and Jerry, Tom's owner would often come running out of the kitchen attempting to swipe Tom with a rolling pin after Tom had destroyed the house attempting to catch a single mouse. Failing that it was a broom.
  • Looney Tunes:
    • The short "Wild Wife" is about a housewife recounting her hectic day to her husband, who thinks she has it easy. It ends with her giving him a gift: a rolling pin monogramed "His". Three guesses what she does next.
    • In another Looney Tunes cartoon, Miss Prissy goes after Foghorn Leghorn with a rolling pin, wanting to make him her husband. Foggy replies, "You're going about it all wrong. You don't bat 'em on the bean with a rolling pin. That comes later."
  • In The Wrong Trousers, Gromit brandishes a rolling pin at Feathers McGraw. Feathers responds by pulling a gun on Gromit and forcing him into the wardrobe with Wallace.
  • The Twelve Tasks of Astérix has Impedimenta using a rolling pin on a gladiator.
  • In Oliver & Company when housekeeper Winston hears noises coming from Georgette's room he gets ready to attack the intruder with the rolling pin he was already holding.
  • Subverted in US of Archie (American History taught by Archie Comics characters), where at a meeting of early 20th-century suffragettes, one lady says she convinced her husband to support women's right to vote — as she brandishes her rolling pin. The others glare at her, as they said earlier that they did not intend to resort to violence. She then explains that tasting her homemade apple pie convinced him to change his mind.

    Other 
  • Disneyland's Pirates of the Caribbean ride has at one point a large woman chasing a food-thieving pirate with a rolling pin.
  • In the song "Consider Yourself" from Oliver!, Dodger in forms us that "It's best to be 'andy wiv a rollin' pin, when the landlord comes to call".

Rings of DeathImprovised IndexSai Guy
Red Filter of DoomDoomy Dooms of DoomShadow of Impending Doom
Injun CountryImageSource/OtherShōnen (Demographic)

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