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Point That Somewhere Else
Don't mess with the Noisy Cricket.

Gently moving aside a weapon pointed at you.

Maybe the hero was caught completely off-guard, or he's being menaced by someone he can't simply strike back against, and is now backed against the wall, with something very sharp in his face. So he'll place one finger on the tip of the weapon and nonchalantly guide it out of his face. If it's really sharp and he doesn't want to risk poking himself, grasping the flat part between finger and thumb is also an acceptable method. It works equally well with a gun, perhaps better because of the lack of cutting parts.

Alternately, this could be done to the hero, if he's confronting a potential ally who he doesn't trust. This trope also covers use of the line as a Stock Phrase.

May be related to Barehanded Blade Block. Better than a Finger In A Barrel. Not to be confused with Artistic License - Gun Safety or I Just Shot Marvin in the Face, although the people listed under those tropes should Point That Somewhere Else.


Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 

    Comic Books 
  • In Archie Comics' Sonic the Hedgehog #237, the Felidae Emissary does this when threatened with a spear.

    Films — Animation 

    Films — Live-Action 
  • Trope Namer: In Return of the Jedi, Han Solo says this to a spear-wielding Ewok.
  • In the less common villainous usage of this, Chauvelin to Sir Percy Blakeney in the 1934 film, The Scarlet Pimpernel. (Things turn a bit ugly for Sir Percy after that.)
    Blakeney: The password — do we have to use force?
    Chauvelin: (waving aside Blakeney's accomplice's pistol) Not at all, Sir Percy. The password is "The Channel is free."
  • Doesn't work in Pan's Labyrinth. Captain Vidal aims his pistol at a wounded revolutionary, who weakly pushes it away once, twice, then rests his hand over the barrel. Vidal shoots him in the head, through his hand.
  • In Thunderball, James pushes aside a rifle that Largo has casually pointed at him as a veiled threat, before taking the gun to admire it.
  • In Weekend at Bernie's, Larry casually pushes aside the barrel of a would-be mugger's handgun and just keeps walking: "Aw, get your ass outta here, it's too hot!"
  • In David Mamet's film Heist, Jimmy points a gun at Joe Moore.
    Joe Moore: He ain't gonna shoot me?
    Fran Moore: No.
    Joe Moore: Then he hadn't ought to point a gun at me. It's insincere.
  • Men In Black. When Agent J points the Noisy Cricket at Agent K, K immediately pushes it away so it isn't pointed at him.
  • Undercover Brother. After the title character "sells out" by acting like a white man, Conspiracy Brother decides to kill him with a shotgun. When he points the shotgun at him, Undercover Brother calmly pushes the barrel aside and grabs it from him. Watch it here.
  • Monkey Business. A gangster hands revolvers to both Groucho and Zeppo on two separate occasions. Both times, after he does so he immediately realizes that they are absentmindedly pointing them right at him, and grabs their hands to turn the guns aside.
  • In The Mask of Zorro, Alejandro does this to Elena when she holds a rapier to his neck, and it turns into flirtation between them.
  • In Sur la piste du Marsupilami, this is done by a parrot (with its talon) when a bandido put a machete under its throat, holding the bird hostage for its master to comply.

    Literature 
  • In the Discworld novel Men at Arms, Sgt. Detritus (a troll) takes a siege bow (i.e. it basically fires telephone poles with blunt points on them to smash castle walls) and points it at the quartermaster in charge of the Ankh-Morpork armory. Corporal Carrot gently points the huge weapon towards the floor while persuading the man to let the Watch borrow some weapons. Naturally, the quartermaster gladly agrees, although he has a hard time getting the words out — the first word he thinks is "FIRE!"
    • This becomes a bit of a running gag when Detritus points the later-refitted siege bow at pretty much anything else, with him either having it redirected or ordered to point it away or put it away. The "Piecemaker," as it is later dubbed, fires large bundles of arrows that disintegrate under the stress to form a rapidly-expanding cloud of deadly wood fragments, taking out anyone or anything that happens to be standing in that general direction, so when coupled with Detritus's shaky grasp of the concept of a safety catch it tends to make his superiors quite jumpy when the Piecemaker is pointed at anything they don't want to see completely leveled.
  • In Generation Kill, Intrepid Reporter Evan Wright is given an M4 by Corporal Ray Person, who can't fire it because he's driving. While Wright never actually fires the gun, when he hands it back, he does so barrel first, which both terrifies and then irritates Person. Wright notes wryly that he was not asked to shoot ever again. (This did not make it into the HBO series)

    Live-Action TV 
  • Stargate SG-1: In the two-parter opening of season 7, SG-1 is captured by Anubis' First Prime, Her'ak, who announces they'll be publicly executed. When O'Neill ponders if it's a necessity for this to be in public, Her'ak puts the tip of his staff weapon under his nose, and asks if he'd rather be killed right there. To which O'Neill answers that he's fine with a public execution, while gently pushing away the weapon head — and then he rubs his fingers, since touching the tip of an activated serpent staff barehanded is unadvised.
  • Rumplestiltskin from Once Upon a Time has a habit of doing this.
  • Any time that Frank Burns in M*A*S*H draws a weapon, he's usually pointing it directly at someone he shouldn't. With his finger on the trigger. However, the only time this trope really comes into play is during the episode "The Bus," where Burns takes a screwdriver from a North Korean soldier who surrendered to them and accuses the POW of sabotage (he actually was fixing their broken-down bus). Burns is holding the screwdriver, and...
    BJ: (gently pushes the screwdriver down) Point that somewhere else, it might go off.
  • Burn Notice. Once while Michael Westen was undercover, when racking the pistol given him by the Villain of the Week, Ruthless Modern Pirate Gerard, he inadvertently points it at the Villain, who shoves the barrel away from his face.
  • The Greatest American Hero. In one episode Bill Maxwell hands Pam Davidson an M-16. When she accidentally points this weapon at Ralph, Bill pushes the barrel away.
  • Only Fools and Horses. Rodney's girlfriend takes him clay pigeon shooting on her father's estate. On his first turn, Rodney stepped up to the shooting area then turned round to speak to the others, inadvertently pointing his shotgun at them. The others yelled at him to lower the barrel but because he was wearing ear protectors he couldn't hear them. Not until the girlfriend's father stepped forward and pushed the gun barrel down towards the ground did Rodney realise what he had done.
  • One episode of Benson has the title character confront an armed gunman. Benson wrongly believes the gun is a fake, and just annoyedly grabs the gun out of the guy's hand, disarming him. Benson then quickly realizes that it's a real gun, and is terrified at what almost happened.

    Video Games 
  • During Cloud and Sephiroth's second battle in Dissidia: Final Fantasy, Cloud points the Buster Blade at Sephiroth when he becomes angry at him for something he said. Sephiroth just smirks and calmly moves it aside.
  • An audio taunt in Age of Empires II is "Don't point that thing at me!" Emphasis is on the word "thing" not the word "me," though, so it sounds kind of strange.
  • Companions in Fallout: New Vegas have amusing, character-specific reactions to having a weapon aimed at them. Cold Sniper Boone asks how the player character would like it if he stuck his rifle in their face, no-nonsense Action Girl Cass will warn the player to knock it off and Cute Bruiser Veronica will ask "Why do we always hurt the ones we love?".
  • Played for laughs in Assassin's Creed II: Neither character is evil, but Bartolomeo is very enthusiastic about "introducing" Ezio to his sword, Bianca. Ezio is startled for a moment but then moves Bianca away, saying that he's "charmed" in a deadpan expression.
  • Bioshock Infinite. If you point your gun at Elizabeth she will tell you "Don't point that thing at me".

    Web Comics 
  • The Order of the Stick, strip #722: "Block and Tackle". During Elan's first encounter with General Tarquin, the latter bends Elan's silver rapier away from his face with the tip of a finger.
  • In Rusty and Co., Plaidbeard the pirate pushes away Madeline the Paladin's hoe from under his nose with two fingers.
  • In an early strip of The Inexplicable Adventures of Bob! strip, Bob is arguing with Jerry, who has him at gunpoint. Bob gets so frustrated he just unthinkingly grabs Jerry's gun out of his hand. An instant afterward, even he's amazed that he did it.
  • In a strip from Schlock Mercenary, the title character explains to a recently ambushed guard that when a stranger approaches and invokes this trope, the best course of action is to open fire immediately. Considering the source (an amoral borderline psychopath who likes to reduce his enemies to ashes and then eat the remains), he might be serious or he might be trying to get the guard to start a messy firefight the next time he runs into trouble.

    Western Animation 


Point DefenselessWeapons and Wielding TropesPoisoned Weapons
Little Useless GunImageSource/Live-Action FilmsMen In Black 3

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