Mutilation Conga

A character gradually accumulates Amusing Injuries over the course of a story, but rather than shrug them off, he shows the traces of every one of them, and ends up a bleeding, black-eyed Implacable Man limping toward his goal. He quite literally looks like the world has chewed him up and spat him back out.

Expect a lot of Clothing Damage, and an attitude of Tranquil Fury. Can be just as easily Played for Laughs or Played for Drama - the latter can work as a subversion of Just A Flesh Wound, as it shows that what doesn't kill you can still slow you down a hell of a lot.

Rasputinian Death is a subtrope where the injuries are each of the No One Could Survive That variety, and the final fatality actually sticks.

Compare: Crush Parade when characters and objects are repeatedly run over and trampled by different things; Scars Are Forever when a character bears the marks of past injuries for the rest of his life. Serial Prostheses might result from this. Contrast Death by Disfigurement, where one lasting wound will spell a death sentence not very sooner.

Do not confuse with Humiliation Conga.

Examples:

Fan Fic
  • Happens to the hero of Sleeping with the Girls over the course of his adventures, and manages to be played for both Drama and Laughs at the same time.
  • Snap goes through this in Play The Game. His determination to save Rudy and Penny is strong enough for him to keep pushing himself forward. His willingness to keep going despite the pain he is clearly in ends up freaking resident Big Bad Bardot out.

Film

Literature
  • Tim Powers, pick a book, any book, and 4 of 5 times this happens to the main character.
  • In the Dragaera series, Vlad Taltos also seems to be accumulating injuries, to the point that Steven Brust Lampshaded it with a Tim Powers pastiche as part of an extended joke at the end of Iorich.
  • It happens as a jump cut rather than extended narration, but The First Law trilogy features an inversion of this: an Eater being interrogated by the Inquisition and painlessly collecting a series of third-degree burns, deep cuts, broken limbs, and other horrific injuries as her Healing Factor starts to run down. The session yields questions instead of answers and, in the face of her defiance and apparent immunity to pain, one of the non-plussed Practicals even claims to be "half-way to breaking, myself" by the end.
  • Tlan Imass in Malazan Book of the Fallen. Being Undead, this doesn't necessarily slow them down much.
  • Wolgang Smith in the Young Bond novel Double or Die is initally described to be very normal looking man, especially next to his tall, skeletal brother Ludwig. He then starts losing bodyparts in several incidents: he loses his right ear when a spark plug flies off from a burning car, Bond knocks out several of his teeth with a piece of marble, he loses four fingers from his left hand when they are caught between two colliding barges, and lastly, his legs are sliced off when a towrope cuts off and whips across the deck of the ship he's on.
  • Appears frequently in the works of Jack Chalker, though given Chalker's other interests, the actual mechanism is frequently (but not always) a Baleful Polymorph. Chalker actually addressed this through an Author Avatar near the end of The Messiah Choice; heroic tales require genuine sacrifice on a heroic scale

Live-Action TV

Professional Wrestling
  • WWE's revival of ECW had Colin Delaney, a jobber who would take brutal beatings and come out wearing more and more bandages every week.

Video Games
  • The health meter in Doom was a picture of a guy's face getting progressively bloodier and beaten up the more damage the player took.
  • The gun-toting mugger in Déjà Vu suffers from this. Each of his first three confrontations can and should end with a punch to the face, and he gets both eyes swollen and a bloody nose before the fourth time, when such a punch gets you shot.
  • Max Payne is a non-comedic example.
  • Recurring Boss examples include Klungo in Banjo-Tooie and King Bulblin in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess.

Web Original

Western Animation
  • One Tom and Jerry cartoon had Tom showing the cumulative effects of each bit of comic mayhem befalling him — completely atypical of the usual business.
  • The My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic episode "It's About Time" begins with Twilight Sparkle getting a visit from her disheveled future self (actually, she's from next Tuesday). Over the course of the episode, her efforts to prevent the "impending disaster" she believes is coming result in her gradually accumulating the injuries her future self had.