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Hassle-Free Hotwire
This was supposed to be easy!!!

Stewie: Quick! Hotwire the car!
Brian: "Hotwire"? I don't even pump my own gas!

"Red's the juice. White's the ground. Strike 'em together and we blow this town..."
Sucre, Prison Break, "Flight"

In the current situation, now is time for action from a character, and that character needs wheels. A vehicle is nowhere in sight, so what does the character do? He hotwires the car in under five seconds and gets on his way.

Wait a second. That looked a lot easier than it actually is, and that character shouldn't even know the first thing about hotwiring the car!

That's where this trope comes from. When needed, everybody can hotwire a vehicle at any time. All they need to do is yank the protective covering off of the wires, rip out two of the wires and connect them together.

This may well be on the way to being a Discredited Trope, as more and more cars either incorporate a necessary processor into the key itself, or require the key fob to be present before they'll start.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

     Film  

  • Used in Battle: Los Angeles. Played with in that it takes several minutes to perform and the character is shown having difficulty with it.
  • In WALL•E, Captain McCrea, someone who's never done anything in their entire life, including standing, is able to hotwire the ship's public address system in a second with no thinking. One can argue that, since he's the captain, he should know a thing or two about the ship, but, then again, he needs help turning the pages of a book, so... yeah.
    • IIRC, he did go on a massive Archive Binge earlier, looking up all sorts of things out of sheer childlike curiosity. It's easy to believe some technical information took root, especially since being massively ignorant does not necessitate him being stupid.
  • Bourne hotwires a car really really fast in the trilogy. He's hurt, people are chasing him, and he still does it in less than ten seconds.
  • The Terminator can hotwire cars with relative ease; justified in that he's got nifty programming, but this ability is still played for laughs when John shows him that most people keep an extra copy of the key in the visor.
    • Actually Terminator never hotwires anything, he does one better. He smashes and rips away the steering column cover, along with the lock cylinder, and then turns the ignition lock shaft with his fingers, which was clearly shown in the first film, and then repeated again in the second. Incidentally, due to it's strength the whole process literally takes it 5 seconds, about as fast as most people take to start a car with a key.
    • Kyle Reese hotwires a car in the first film as well.
    • The film was an example of Shown Their Work, as the creators actually researched the correct way to hotwire the cars in question.
  • Averted in the second The Matrix. Trinity has to ask their (literal) Voice with an Internet Connection to make her able to do so via a (again, literal) Powers as Programs system. Of course this proves unnecessary, as she's escorting a rogue computer program who literally has the ability to open any lock.
  • In The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003), Erin hotwires the van.
  • Bizarre Double Subversion in A Sound of Thunder: the protagonists encounter an SUV-like vehicle (this is the future, mind you). One of the scientists mentions it has a special lock, and starts listing all the equipment they will need to break it. However, before she can finish, the team's doctor breaks the window with his gun and hotwires it in a flash. When everyone stares at him dumbfounded, he just says "How do you think I put myself through medical school, hmm?" So... yeah.
  • Chev Chelio hotwires a car in Crank High Voltage with the usual movie method of ripping out wires in the car and connecting them. The fact he knows how to hotwire a car can possibly be justified, since he is a hitman, but not entirely since what hitman really needs to know how to do that?
  • In one of the Police Academy movies, Zed (a convicted criminal turned police officer) hotwires a car by ripping out the appropriate wires and biting them.
  • Averted in Die Hard with a Vengeance.
    McClane: You know how to hot-wire this thing?
    Zeus: Of course I can, I'm an electrician. Only problem is...
    [Zeus turns the ignition with his pliers]
    Zeus: It takes too fuckin' long.
  • A bit averted in National Security when Martin Lawrence has to hotwire a car carried inside a semi trailer with a bit of struggle of having to know the design and the model year.
  • In Dantes Peak Pierce Brosnan's vulcanologist can hotwire a pickup in about two seconds.
  • In Planet51, Chuck is able to hotwire an alien car with pretty much zero hassle. Later on Lem is able to do the same despite only having watched Chuck perform the hotwire once (though his case is slightly more realistic given that he's likely to be more familiar with hovercars than Chuck).

     Literature  

  • The kids from Maximum Ride are all able to hotwire cars with ease, thanks to training their adopted dad Jeb gives them. While Max tells the readers that it works nothing like how it is shown on TV, she refuses to go into specifics for fear of inspiring a bunch of readers to steal cars.
  • Fox Tayle attempts this once or twice when the FBI is chasing him.
  • Averted in Animorphs: Rachel discovers that jamming a six-inch-long grizzly bear claw into the ignition and turning works just as well as the key.
  • Alice hotwires some very expensive cars when she and Bella are in Italy in Breaking Dawn.
  • Averted in the Stephen King story Dolan's Cadillac. Not only does the narrator have trouble making it work (even after being shown how it's done), but King says in a note to the story that he deliberately wrote that scene incorrectly to avoid giving car thieves specific instructions on how to hot-wire.

     Live Action TV  

  • In the episode Flight of Prison Break, Sucre sings the song quoted above when attempting to hotwire a car. It doesn't work, however, as it turns out the car is missing its engine.
  • Prison Break again, throughout series two and four the characters have little difficulty commandeering and obtaining vehicles undetected.
  • Played straight and somewhat plausibly in Buffy the Vampire Slayer when Giles hotwires his clunky old Citroen in "Dead Man's Party".
    • Not only is an older car, it's implied that Giles, being a Former Teen Rebel, has a lot of experience hotwiring cars. He even says that it's "Like riding a bloody bicycle" note 
  • Nearly every episode of 24

     Tabletop Games  

  • In the popular zombie apocalypse tabletop game All Things Zombie, this trope is played straight and inverted. Every character can try to hotwire any vehicle on the board, and chances are he or she will eventually succeed. However, a special rule named "The car won't start!" makes it much harder to hotwire the car if there are zombies near the car closing in.

     Videogames  

  • Averted in most of the Grand Theft Auto games because the protagonist never actually hotwires anything. Except for the fourth installment, where the trope is played straight, as the player can see the protagonist duck under the dashboard to start the engine whenever he jacks a car outside of a mission.
    • The DS version of Grand Theft Auto: Chinatown Wars requires work on the touch screen to hotwire a car. Still, the trope is played straight.
    • GTA IV is also playing the trope straight. The hotwiring process is mostly automatic once you press the gas button, but if you keep hitting it, your character will do it faster.
  • Also, in Alone In The Dark 2008, Edward can get in to any car around Central Park, pull a few wires out and there's a little minigame for you to get the right pair together. Can be slightly difficult when you've got a few enemies bearing down on you though.

     Webcomics  

     Web Original  

  • In the YouTube series An Emo Life, one of the characters hotwires at least one car and an airplane.

     Western Animation  

     Truth In Television 

  • Real life joyriders and twoccers do manage to hotwire cars with what seems to less skilled onlookers like unfeasible ease and rapidity. It's partly due to the amount of practice they have, and partly to the petty-criminal trait of not caring about collateral damage which often causes non-criminals to overestimate the difficulty of overcoming physical security measures.


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