troperville

tools

toys

SubpagesAlternativeCharacterInterpretation
Analysis
AndTheFandomRejoiced
Awesome
AwesomeMusic
BadassBoast
Characters
ContinuityNod
DethroningMoment
DrinkingGame
EldritchAbomination
FandomSpecificPlot
FanficRecs
FoeYay
Fridge
Funny
Gush
Haiku
Headscratchers
Heartwarming
HighOctaneNightmareFuel
HoYay
ImageLinks
Laconic
LargeHam
Main
Memes
Monster
Narm
NightmareFuel
NoodleIncident
OhCrap
Pinball
Quotes
Radar
Recap
ReferencedBy
Series
ShoutOut
TearJerker
TheNthDoctor
TimeyWimeyBall
Trivia
VideoGame
WMG
WallBangers
WhamEpisode
WhatAnIdiot
Woobie
YMMV

main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Eldritch Abomination: Doctor Who
  • The eponymous creature in Image of the Fendahl; everyone who saw it died of fright, and that was only a crippled ghost of its true self 12 million years dead, which had been manipulating human lineages for millennia to ensure its release. In the Doctor Who Expanded Universe, the Time Lords deliberately created the Fendahl Predator, a malign void which could reach across time and space to feed on the stuff of thought and hungered to devour all eternity, from the Big Bang to the end of time. Those who looked at it saw an endless procession of grotesque images, as their mind struggled to comprehend the incomprehensible. And then the Time Lords released it to use for warfare - only to find it already dead at the hands of an even worse abomination - the Memeovore, the Devourer of Concept.
    • Not everyone who saw the Fendahl was lucky enough to die of fright. The Core transformed some of them into Fendahleen (the other components that, together with the Core, make up the Fendahl). The leader of the cultists who completed the process of creating the Core had worse luck than that. He was still alive, still human, and seeming still sane... but what he saw when he looked into the eyes of the Fendahl caused him to request the means to kill himself. How bad it was is evidenced by the Doctor giving him those means.
  • The Beast from The Impossible Planet/The Satan Pit, so much so that the Doctor refuses to understand it.
    • In Torchwood, we meet its spawn, who kills people with its shadow.
  • The eponymous Big Bad in The Curse of Fenric is described as evil incarnate from almost the beginning of the universe, albeit one without a body of its own, instead possessing others' bodies. One of the spinoff novels identifies Fenric as Hastur the Unspeakable from the Cthulhu Mythos.
  • The Doctor Who Expanded Universe says the TARDIS itself is an Eldritch Abomination, which considerately disguises itself to avoid reducing the passengers to gibbering wrecks. As a living shape-shifting creature, at home in extra-dimensional spaces, with a mind even the Doctor deems unfathomably alien, it's certainly a good candidate. A minor story comments on the TARDIS' mind as completely and utterly pandimensional.
    • The 2011 episode The Doctor's Wife has the mind and essence of the TARDIS trapped inside a humanoid female body for a while, and it is shown to be kind and caring, and feels nothing but love for the Doctor.
  • The... creature from Midnight. We don't see much of it, so it's nothing definite. But it Mind Rapes the Doctor and, by turning the people he's trying to save against him, comes closer to killing him than anything else.
    Sky/Doctor: He's waited so long. In the dark. And the cold. And the diamonds. Until you came. Bodies so hot. With blood. And pain.
  • There's a lot of evidence pointing towards the Time Lords being an entire species of this trope, given their incredible age and intelligence, how easily and often the very laws of reality are twisted like playthings by them, and their inherent ability to perceive the universe in ways no other species can. Indeed, several of the conflicts between the Doctor and the Master play out a lot like battles in an endless war between two Eldritch Abominations, with the poor lesser beings caught between.
    • If they weren't this initially, then they definitely became this during the Last Great Time War, given the Doctor's description and the events of The End of Time.
    • In the Expanded Universe, fighting a war even worse than the one described in the TV show, Time Lords are combat bio-engineered to regenerate into the perfect soldier for any environment. In one case, this means turning into minor Cthulhu Mythos creatures.
  • Remember the Doctor's line from The Pandorica Opens about the thing the Pandorica was designed to hold: "There was a goblin, or a trickster... or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world." It's the Doctor himself.
  • The Daleks certainly believe the Doctor is one. They call him "Bringer of Darkness", "The Oncoming Storm", "The Destroyer of the Worlds" and "The Predator of the Daleks", he's the only being in the universe they outright fear (keep in mind they were deliberately engineered to feel nothing but hate for all things non-Dalek), and Asylum of the Daleks shows that the few Daleks that survived encounters with him were driven almost permanently catatonic by the experience.
  • An assortment of Eldritch Abominations apparently rose from the midst of the Last Great Time War, such as the Skaro Degradations, the Nightmare Child, the Horde of Travesties, and the Couldhavebeen King with his armies of Meanwhiles and Never-weres. The Time Lock around the War is there, in part, to stop these things from ever getting out.
  • The Eternals, beings that live outside of time in eternity, are immortal and use the imagination of people from our universe (they call us Ephemerals) to form realities. They can take anyone they want from any point in time and force them to do whatever they wish. They are not invincible, though; if somehow trapped in our reality, they are mortal and vulnerable.
  • Again from the Expanded Universe, the Ancient Old Ones, beings from the previous universe that follow different physics, which allows them vast Reality Warper abilities; this can be inverted with beings from the next universe that have similar powers.
  • The Great Vampires, who fought the early Time Lords in the war that made the entire species get sick of violence, are gargantuan winged creatures who feast on planets, and can only be killed by having their heart destroyed. But they are so massive that the Time Lords had to invent a new type of ship specifically for hunting them. The only way the Doctor managed to best the one he encountered was by stabbing it with a rocket ship.
  • The Nestene Consciousness, a formless entity powerful enough to control innumerable psychic links over many light years, capable of bringing life to any plastic which it uses to launch an invasion army. In the Doctor Who Expanded Universe it's one of the thousand children of Shub-Niggurath.
  • Sutekh, Last of the Osirans, from Pyramids of Mars. At the time, the Doctor describes him as the worst threat he has ever faced, the greatest time of peril in the history of the Earth, and given his awakening would have rendered the planet a barren wasteland before he spread across the universe to kill everything, his concern was very much justified.
  • The Animus from The Web Planet. In the Doctor Who Expanded Universe, it's actually Lloigor, one of the Great Old Ones from the Cthulhu Mythos.
  • The Weeping Angels: impossibly fast creatures, indistinguishable from ordinary statues until you look away, able to transport people through time (because it's how they feed, off of all the "stolen moments"), and can project themselves through images, including images inside a person's mind.
  • The Great Intelligence, a powerful, disembodied consciousness that whispers in people's minds for years or even decades to turn them into willing puppets, and was infrequently encountered until The Name of the Doctor - in which it makes an almost successful attempt to destroy the Doctor's entire life back to even before he ever left Gallifrey. Before that, it attempted to steal all of the Doctor's life experiences and memories and mentally revert him back to a younger age. It manifested bizarre powers and whenever it deigned to take physical form, it could Body Surf if the body it was in was damaged. The Doctor Who Expanded Universe identifies the Great Intelligence as an alias of Yog-Sothoth.
  • The House from The Doctor's Wife, a malevolent, ancient living asteroid that originally existed outside the universe (the plug hole at the bottom of the universe), and eats TARDISes.
  • The Old God, or "Grandfather", from The Rings of Akhaten. A creature so powerful even the Doctor is willing to consider it a god, which has been sung to for millennia (constantly, with singers rotating in and out but the song never having been interrupted, ever) because if the songs cease for even a second, it will wake and devour all existence (oh, and it's the size of a planet). The parallels to Azathoth couldn't be more blatant.
  • The Moment is one of the more understated ones and yet probably the most powerful in the series. Never mind that it's a piece of mechanics complex enough to develop a consciousness, throughout its only appearance it repeatedly and calmly punches holes in the Time Lock around the Time War. As a reminder, this is the same barrier that's strong enough to (mostly) seamlessly contain the full might of the Daleks, Time Lords, and every other Eldritch Abomination they brought with them.
  • Big Finish Doctor Who: Anti-Time essentially causes this. There are the Neverpeople, people who have experienced Ret Gone, and are left as ghosts who devour people's time. Zagreus is the personification of Anti-Time, someone who shouldn't exist and can cancel out events.

The Sarah Jane Adventures
  • "Ancient lights", Hive Queens to at least part of the universe that existed before the Big Bang.
  • The Abomination. In this case a Brown Note painting and not a flesh and blood being. Unfortunately, it was painted with psychically active ink, which was capable of bringing the creature depicted to life. Oops.
  • The Trickster, part of a Pantheon, whose sole motivation is to cause chaos in the universe at large.


Live-Action TVEldritch AbominationMusic

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
21395
42