troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Creator: Boris Vallejo
Boris Vallejo (born January 8th, 1941) is a Peruvian-born American artist.

Alone or in conjunction with his wife, Julie Bell, Vallejo has provided dozens of covers for fantasy/sf paperbacks, and posters for films such as Barbarella and the ''Aqua Teen Hunger Force'' movie.

You've probably seen at least one of Vallejo's works, which often feature muscular men and attractive women in states of near-total undress. His characteristic imagery has been highly influential within the fantasy genre, particularly with the covers he painted for Conan the Barbarian and other such works.

Vallejo's work is often confused with that of Frank Frazetta, as the two artists have/had similar styles, and both worked on Conan and a couple of other projects.

Most links on this page lead to images that are at least slightly NSFW (some more than others) so beware.


Provides Examples Of:

  • Amazonian Beauty/Statuesque Stunner: Quite a few of the females in his art are tall, muscular, and strong, many done from sketches of models who he and Bell, a former bodybuilder, knew from gyms. (He's even made a few paintings using Bell as a model, and she qualified too when she was younger.
  • Fantasy Kitchen Sink: Wizards, robots, aliens, demons, monsters, princesses, vampires, weird worlds and dimensions, and countless combinations of all of them are seen in his art. If its fantasy-related, he's probably drawn it. (Bell's work is much the same.)
  • Fluffy Tamer: It's rare to see a beautiful, scantily clad princess being menaced by some hideous monster in his works, but very common to see one commanding such beasts.
  • Genre-Busting: He tends to combine fantasy and science fiction into his work in very odd ways. A scantily clad sorceress riding a desert on a unicorn with an android following her... Suffice to say, it's odd.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: This work, painted in 1997, is supposed to depict the ruins of New York City a thousand years in the future (as Vallejo himself commented on after the 9/11 attacks), but the Twin Towers are still standing.
  • It's Not Porn, It's Art
  • Leg Cling: He popularized the pose with scenes like this one.
  • Meta Casting: Bell has posed for a few of his paintings, like this one here, and Bell's sister Suzanne was the model for this one. His daughter Maya was the model for the young girl in this 1979 painting.
  • Nubile Savage: Lots his female characters are like this, along with many of the men.
  • Our Mermaids Are Different: To quote him directly, "Most of my models want to be mermaids. I have to say I prefer mermaids without the fish tails. The Nyads are creatures of Greek mythology, and fish tails are never mentioned in any of the descriptions I've seen." One example seen here.
  • Shameless Fanservice Girl: Pretty much all of the women in his works.
  • Scenery Porn: He tends to put more attention on humans, but a few backgrounds are very well-done.
  • Strange Minds Think Alike: Vallejo had no idea how similar this work in 1979 was to a scene in The Cell until he saw the movie years later.
  • Stripperiffic: Tilting towards the, ah, nakeder end of the scale. Unless Vallejo is explicitly drawing somebody else's intellectual property (such as his pin-ups for Marvel in the '90s), it's unlikely that a character that emerged from his pen is wearing much besides a loincloth and maybe some shoes. As Vallejo has gotten older, his work has moved further towards erotica than his earlier pieces.
  • Thong of Shielding: A lot of his paintings seem to draw attention to the woman's bottom, the scene done with her back to the viewer; he has said in commentary that the lower body is the part he enjoys painting the most.

Raphael SanzioArtistsVincent van Gogh

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
8445
44