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* ShipToShipCombat: [[ShipperOnDeck In-universe]] - Charles Musgrove is a Louisa Musgrove/Captain Wentworth shipper; his wife Mary is a Henrietta Musgrove/Captain Wentworth shipper. Things almost get ugly between them over this. There were deeper implications. Mary really didn't want Henrietta to "throw herself away" on country curate Charles Hayter. It is, after all, very inconvenient to be "giving bad connections to those who have not been used to them."


* {{Anvilicious}}: The text emphasizes its message on the importance of yielding to persuasion by brutally physically punishing Louisa Musgrove.

to:

* {{Anvilicious}}: The text emphasizes its message on Louisa's near-fatal fall from the importance Cobb breakwall is very obviously in service of yielding the author's point re: strength of character needing to persuasion be tempered by brutally physically punishing Louisa Musgrove.prudence.


* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Anne's statements on the subject of persuasion are endlessly debated.

to:

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Anne's statements on the subject of persuasion are endlessly debated.



* StoicWoobie: Anne
* SympatheticSue: Anne -- Austen herself admitted that she was a "heroine [who] is almost too good for me."

to:

* StoicWoobie: Anne
* SympatheticSue: Anne -- Austen herself admitted that she was a "heroine [who] is almost too good for me."
Anne.

Added DiffLines:

----


** Real women must yield to persuasion, regardless of the value of the counsel, decides Anne towards the end.

to:

** Real women must She was correct to yield to (what she sees as parental) persuasion, regardless of the value of the counsel, decides Anne towards the end.



** Or, alternatively, female/family attachments matter before romantic ones (seeing as her boyfriend was giving her 'persuasion' of exactly the opposite nature, her dilemma wasn't whether she yielded to persuasion, but to whose.)
** Captain Harville would seriously rather see his good friend and almost-brother-in-law continue to suffer from clinical depression than see him marry another woman?


** Or, alternatively, female/family attachments matter before romantic ones (seeing as her boyfriend was giving her 'persuasion' of exactly the opposite nature, her dilemma wasn't whether she yielded to persuasion, but to whose.)

to:

** Or, alternatively, female/family attachments matter before romantic ones (seeing as her boyfriend was giving her 'persuasion' of exactly the opposite nature, her dilemma wasn't whether she yielded to persuasion, but to whose.))
** Captain Harville would seriously rather see his good friend and almost-brother-in-law continue to suffer from clinical depression than see him marry another woman?

Added DiffLines:

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Anne's statements on the subject of persuasion are endlessly debated.


* CompleteMonster: [[spoiler:Mr Elliot]], at least by JaneAusten standards. Mrs Smith describes him as "a man without heart or conscience; a designing, wary, cold-blooded being... would be guilty of any cruelty... totally beyond the reach of any sentiment of justice or compassion... black at heart, hollow and black!" He really does come across as a bit of a sociopath in the text.


* CrowningMomentOfFunny: The description from Chapter 6 of the deceased Richard Musgrove:
-->"[Richard] had, in fact... been nothing better than a thick-headed, unfeeling, unprofitable Dick Musgrove, who had never done any thing to entitle himself to more than the abbreviation of his name, living or dead."
::Which was nothing more nor less at the time than a riff on 'Dick' being a low-class nickname...and is now a good example of HaveAGayOldTime.
* CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming: The look on Captain Wentworth's face when Anne joins him by the captain's wheel in the 1995 film version. Ciaran Hinds conveys volumes with one soft smile.


* ShipToShipCombat: In-universe - Charles Musgrove is a Louisa Musgrove/Captain Wentworth shipper; his wife Mary is a Henrietta Musgrove/Captain Wentworth shipper. Things almost get ugly between them over this. There were deeper implications. Mary really didn't want Henrietta to "throw herself away" on country curate Charles Hayter. It is, after all, very inconvenient to be "giving bad connections to those who have not been used to them."

to:

* ShipToShipCombat: In-universe [[ShipperOnDeck In-universe]] - Charles Musgrove is a Louisa Musgrove/Captain Wentworth shipper; his wife Mary is a Henrietta Musgrove/Captain Wentworth shipper. Things almost get ugly between them over this. There were deeper implications. Mary really didn't want Henrietta to "throw herself away" on country curate Charles Hayter. It is, after all, very inconvenient to be "giving bad connections to those who have not been used to them."


* ShipToShipCombat: Charles Musgrove is a Louisa Musgrove/Captain Wentworth shipper; his wife Mary is a Henrietta Musgrove/Captain Wentworth shipper. Things almost get ugly between them over this. There were deeper implications. Mary really didn't want Henrietta to "throw herself away" on country curate Charles Hayter. It is, after all, very inconvenient to be "giving bad connections to those who have not been used to them."

to:

* ShipToShipCombat: In-universe - Charles Musgrove is a Louisa Musgrove/Captain Wentworth shipper; his wife Mary is a Henrietta Musgrove/Captain Wentworth shipper. Things almost get ugly between them over this. There were deeper implications. Mary really didn't want Henrietta to "throw herself away" on country curate Charles Hayter. It is, after all, very inconvenient to be "giving bad connections to those who have not been used to them."


* CompleteMonster: [[spoiler:Mr Elliot]], at least by JaneAusten standards. Mrs Smith describes him as "a man without heart or conscience; a designing, wary, cold-blooded being... would be guilty of any cruelty... totally beyond the reach of any sentiment of justice or compassion... black at heart, hollow and black!" He really does come across as a bit of a sociopath in the text.ve for ''not'' yielding to persuasion at Lyme.

to:

* CompleteMonster: [[spoiler:Mr Elliot]], at least by JaneAusten standards. Mrs Smith describes him as "a man without heart or conscience; a designing, wary, cold-blooded being... would be guilty of any cruelty... totally beyond the reach of any sentiment of justice or compassion... black at heart, hollow and black!" He really does come across as a bit of a sociopath in the text.ve for ''not'' yielding to persuasion at Lyme.


* {{Anvilicious}}: The text emphasizes its message on the importance of yielding to persuasion by brutally physically punishing Louisa Musgro

to:

* {{Anvilicious}}: The text emphasizes its message on the importance of yielding to persuasion by brutally physically punishing Louisa MusgroMusgrove.


Added DiffLines:

* CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming: The look on Captain Wentworth's face when Anne joins him by the captain's wheel in the 1995 film version. Ciaran Hinds conveys volumes with one soft smile.


** Well there's nothing saying [[spoiler: Sir Walter]] won't marry now that he's more open to it and he has little money so [[spoiler: Elliot]] is only getting a title.



* ValuesDissonance: Real women must yield to persuasion, regardless of the value of the counsel, decides Anne towards the end.

to:

* ValuesDissonance: ValuesDissonance:
**
Real women must yield to persuasion, regardless of the value of the counsel, decides Anne towards the end.


* SympatheticSue: Anne -- Austen herself admitted that she was a "heroine [who] is almost too good for me."

to:

* SympatheticSue: Anne -- Austen herself admitted that she was a "heroine [who] is almost too good for me.""
* ValuesDissonance: Real women must yield to persuasion, regardless of the value of the counsel, decides Anne towards the end.
-->"I must believe that I was right, much as I suffered from it, that I was perfectly right in being guided by the friend whom you will love better than you do now. To me, she was in the place of a parent. Do not mistake me, however. I am not saying that she did not err in her advice. ... But I mean, that I was right in submitting to her, ... and if I mistake not, a strong sense of duty is no bad part of a woman's portion."
** Or, alternatively, female/family attachments matter before romantic ones (seeing as her boyfriend was giving her 'persuasion' of exactly the opposite nature, her dilemma wasn't whether she yielded to persuasion, but to whose.)

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