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** The Medic's Immunize skill in the same game. It reduces all damage types by a massive amount, especially when boosted. It was cut in ''Heroes of Lagaard'', then made its reappearance ''The Millennium Girl'' with nerfed damage reduction and only applying to elementals.
** 1st Turn and Slowstep in ''Heroes of Lagaard'' are supposed to have chances of failure which decrease with investment up until Level 8, but a bug skips the check for failure, so these skills are always effective (and far more efficient due to their low TP cost) at Level 1.

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** The Medic's Immunize skill in the same game. It reduces all damage types by a massive amount, especially when boosted. It was cut in ''Heroes of Lagaard'', then made its reappearance ''The Millennium Girl'' with nerfed damage reduction and only applying to elementals.
** 1st Turn and Slowstep in ''Heroes of Lagaard'' the first two games are supposed to have chances of failure which decrease with investment up until Level 8, but a bug skips the check for failure, so these skills are always effective (and far more efficient due to their low TP cost) at Level 1.


** In ''Beyond The Myth'', Necromancers' Wraiths and Rovers' Hawk and Hound can attack enemies, which does little damage but is still usually an acceptable supplement to your own party's attacks. Unfortunately, these attacks also wake up sleeping enemies, which means the sleep ailment is much more unreliable for any party containing these classes. Oh, and [[spoiler:the Eternal Tyrant, the final boss]] is weak to sleep, so these "allies" will most likely deny you some precious opportunities to heal and reapply buffs during this difficult battle.

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** In ** Downplayed since it's the player's choice to deploy them, but in ''Beyond The Myth'', Necromancers' Wraiths and Rovers' Hawk and Hound can attack enemies, which does little damage but is still usually an acceptable supplement to your own party's attacks. Unfortunately, these attacks also wake up sleeping enemies, which means the sleep ailment is much more unreliable for any party containing these classes. Oh, and [[spoiler:the Eternal Tyrant, the final boss]] is weak to sleep, so these "allies" will most likely deny you some precious opportunities to heal and reapply buffs during this difficult battle.



** Some classes have skills that [[CriticalStatusBuff get stronger the more HP percentage the user is missing]], most notably Impact Brawler Puglists from ''Beyond the Myth''. This suddenly makes line- and party-wide heals, as well as the Hound's AI-dictated healing, problematic if you have a strategy built around these "massive damage if the user is near death" skills.

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** The Ronin and Hexer classes in the original game. They already suffer hard from LateCharacterSyndrome because you can only recruit them at the start of the 3rd and 4th strata respectively, yet they still start at Level 1 [[CantCatchUp in a game that requires a lot of grinding.]] However, if you put in all that effort to grind them up, they're still the two worst classes in the game. Ronin has the strongest attacking potential in the game, but because it requires a turn to set up a stance to use it, it becomes too slow for use in random battles and bosses can still dispel their stance to nullify their abilities. Hexer is a class dedicated to StandardStatusEffects, which, unlike in later entries, are as much of a UselessUsefulSpell as the genre standard here (and Dark Hunter, which statuses and does damage, is already available at the start of the game, leading the Hexer dead on arrival).


*** The Giant's Ruin in ''Nexus'' can get very irritating because of the deliberately inflated encounter rate. Not helping matters is that this is done to set up FOE gimmicks, as they are statues that will not move or engage in battle until the player already is in battle, but can still block chokepoints at the wrong times. Also, damage tiles there are ''guaranteed'' to initiate a battle. To make matters worse, the random monsters have markedly more HP than any non-FOE enemy you've fought up until that point, which gives those statues more time to catch up to you.
*** The Blossom Bridge in ''Nexus'' throws some extremely confusing floating platform puzzles at you that can take hours of frustration to figure out, assuming you don't just [[MoonLogicPuzzle give up trying to figure out the logic behind each puzzle]]. It also has Big Moths, who can generate a swift GameOver by using Confusion Dust to spread Panic to your party so that they can quickly kill themselves while being unable to evade the enemies' attacks.

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*** The Giant's Ruin in ''Nexus'' can get very irritating because of the deliberately inflated encounter rate. Not helping matters is that this is done to set up FOE gimmicks, as they are statues that will not move or engage in battle until the player already is in battle, but can still block chokepoints at the wrong times. Also, damage tiles there are ''guaranteed'' to initiate a battle. To make matters worse, the random monsters have markedly more HP than any non-FOE enemy you've fought up until that point, which gives those statues more time to catch up to you.
*** The Blossom Bridge in ''Nexus'' throws some extremely confusing floating platform puzzles at you that can take hours of frustration to figure out, assuming you don't just [[MoonLogicPuzzle give up trying to figure out the logic behind each puzzle]]. It also has Big Moths, who can generate a swift GameOver by using Confusion Dust to spread Panic to your party so that they can quickly kill themselves while being unable to evade the enemies' attacks.


* The main dungeons of ''Nexus'' draw from previous strata in the series but don't overstay their welcome. The side dungeons, on the other hand, tend to feature annoying gimmicks that discourage exploration when they're immediately unlocked:

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* ** The main dungeons of ''Nexus'' draw from previous strata in the series but don't overstay their welcome. The side dungeons, on the other hand, tend to feature annoying gimmicks that discourage exploration when they're immediately unlocked:


** The Claret Hollows, the BrutalBonusLevel of the first game and its remake, is rife with such floors to push the player's patience to the absolute limit. Not helping matters is that the first game has a very primitive mapping system so it's very difficult to construct a good map to help you through. You're likely to ''hit the icon cap'' while mapping the floors out.

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** The Claret Hollows, the BrutalBonusLevel of the first game and its remake, is rife with such floors to might as well be That One ''Stratum'' because its floor design will push the player's patience to the absolute limit. Not helping matters is that the first game has a very primitive mapping system so it's very difficult to construct a good map to help you through. You're likely to ''hit the icon cap'' while mapping the floors out.



*** [=B27F=] mostly consists of a wide open area, littered with invisible pitfalls that drop you into a large open dead-end of the next floor. Said next floor is littered with damage tiles and fast [=FOEs=] that can swoop in on your position and ambush you. There's no convenient way to intuit the invisible pitfalls, so it's mostly trial and error; all in all it totals to close to '''300''' pitfalls to navigate around! The remake makes the pitfalls visible, staggers their distribution for an easier mapping time, and applies a BlackoutBasement element to make it harder to see the pitfalls.
*** [=B29F=] is ''the'' most tedious teleporter maze, perhaps in the entire series. With more warps and destinations than your icon cap can handle, you will easily find yourself lost and driven [[TitleDrop Half-Mad From Self-Doubt]]. Again, its parallel in the remake only slightly simplifies the maze.
*** To top it all off, in the original, the only shortcut in the stratum is ''[[CheckpointStarvation right at the very end]]'', linking the beginning of the stratum to the doors to the ultimate BonusBoss, so if you're making any return trips you ''must'' traverse the floors in their entirety. Mercifully, the remake adds shortcuts in each floor to shorten your return trips.

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*** [=B27F=] mostly consists of a wide open area, littered with invisible pitfalls that drop you into a large open dead-end of the next floor. Said next floor is littered with damage tiles and fast [=FOEs=] that can swoop in on your position and ambush you. There's no convenient way to intuit the invisible pitfalls, so it's mostly trial and error; all in all it totals to close to '''300''' pitfalls to navigate around! The remake staggers the pitfalls' locations, makes the pitfalls them visible, staggers their distribution for an easier mapping time, and applies but also partially obscures them with a BlackoutBasement element to make it harder to see the pitfalls.
experience more fair.
*** [=B29F=] is ''the'' most tedious teleporter maze, perhaps in the entire series. With more warps and destinations than your icon cap can handle, you will easily find yourself lost and driven [[TitleDrop [[MeaningfulName Half-Mad From Self-Doubt]]. Again, its parallel in the remake only slightly simplifies the maze.
*** To top it all off, in the original, the only shortcut in the stratum is ''[[CheckpointStarvation right at the very end]]'', linking the beginning of the stratum to the doors to the ultimate BonusBoss, so if you're making any return trips you ''must'' traverse the floors in their entirety. Mercifully, the remake adds shortcuts in each floor to shorten your return trips.trips, in addition to the whole Floor Jump mechanic letting you focus on mapping out new ground.



** [=29F=] of ''Beyond the Myth'' is not just any teleporter maze -- it's a teleporter maze that sends the player ''all the way back'' through the unexplored parts of the lower floors and back up again, traversing rooms with [=FOEs=] that frustrate a player trying to thoroughly fill out their map. [[CheckpointStarvation Shortcuts that speed up return trips are scarce]], and from time to time there will be certain teleporters positioned to send the player back to already-explored regions of the map if they enter it from the wrong angle, wasting a lot of time returning to where they left off. [[spoiler:To top it off, near the end is a door with a teleporter placed directly behind it that sets the player back by a good amount, and if they forgot to unlock a shortcut not too far away, well...]]
** The Giant's Ruin in ''Nexus'' can get very irritating because of the deliberately inflated encounter rate. Not helping matters is that this is done to set up FOE gimmicks, as they are statues that will not move or engage in battle until the player already is in battle, but can still block chokepoints at the wrong times. Also, damage tiles there are ''guaranteed'' to initiate a battle. To make matters worse, the random monsters have markedly more HP than any non-FOE enemy you've fought up until that point, which gives those statues more time to catch up to you.
** The Blossom Bridge in ''Nexus'' throws some extremely confusing floating platform puzzles at you that can take hours of frustration to figure out, assuming you don't just [[MoonLogicPuzzle give up trying to figure out the logic behind each puzzle]]. It also has Big Moths, who can generate a swift GameOver by using Confusion Dust to spread Panic to your party so that they can quickly kill themselves while being unable to evade the enemies' attacks.
** The Illusory Woods makes for a rather rude awakening in the transition to the ''Nexus'' postgame. Before you even start, the game warns you to make sure you have Ariadne Threads on hand. That's because the [=FOEs=] here can chase you everywhere and can even ''pass through walls''. Once one of them has been alerted to your presence there's no escaping it except by returning to town. To make matters worse, the place is infested with DemonicSpiders that give the FOE more time to close in on you.

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** [=29F=] of ''Beyond the Myth'' is not just any teleporter maze -- it's a teleporter maze that sends the player ''all the way back'' through the unexplored parts of the lower earlier floors and back up again, traversing rooms with [=FOEs=] that frustrate a player trying to thoroughly fill out their map. [[CheckpointStarvation Shortcuts that speed up return trips are scarce]], and from time to time there will be certain teleporters positioned to send the player back to already-explored regions of the map if they enter it from the wrong angle, wasting a lot of time returning to where they left off. [[spoiler:To top it off, near the end is a door with a teleporter placed directly behind it that sets the player back by a good amount, and if they forgot to unlock a shortcut not too far away, well...]]
** * The main dungeons of ''Nexus'' draw from previous strata in the series but don't overstay their welcome. The side dungeons, on the other hand, tend to feature annoying gimmicks that discourage exploration when they're immediately unlocked:
***
The Giant's Ruin in ''Nexus'' can get very irritating because of the deliberately inflated encounter rate. Not helping matters is that this is done to set up FOE gimmicks, as they are statues that will not move or engage in battle until the player already is in battle, but can still block chokepoints at the wrong times. Also, damage tiles there are ''guaranteed'' to initiate a battle. To make matters worse, the random monsters have markedly more HP than any non-FOE enemy you've fought up until that point, which gives those statues more time to catch up to you.
** *** The Blossom Bridge in ''Nexus'' throws some extremely confusing floating platform puzzles at you that can take hours of frustration to figure out, assuming you don't just [[MoonLogicPuzzle give up trying to figure out the logic behind each puzzle]]. It also has Big Moths, who can generate a swift GameOver by using Confusion Dust to spread Panic to your party so that they can quickly kill themselves while being unable to evade the enemies' attacks.
** *** The Illusory Woods makes for a rather rude awakening in the transition to the ''Nexus'' postgame. Before you even start, the game warns you to make sure you have Ariadne Threads on hand. That's because the [=FOEs=] here can chase you everywhere and can even ''pass through walls''. Once one of them has been alerted to your presence there's no escaping it except by returning to town. To make matters worse, the place is infested with DemonicSpiders that give the FOE more time to close in on you.


* ReplacementScrappy: When early info about ''The Drowned City'' was released, and fans learned the original classes wouldn't return, Gladiators were blasted as being generic and vastly inferior 'replacements' for the Dark Hunter class, despite players not knowing anything about it beyond the physical appearance of ''one'' representative. Thankfully, this reaction died down over time.
** Even funnier when you finally found out that Gladiator is supposed to replace the ''Landsknecht'' instead. [[labelnote:note]]The Princess gets the Landsknecht's ability to equip heavy armor, while the Gladiator is a straight combatant; while their armor choices emulate Dark Hunters, they generally lack the ability to dole out status effects unless they invest in Stun Attack. But in turn, when compared to Landsknechts, both classes can specialize in two weapons: Sword and Axe/Hammer, and their sword skills rely on hitting as many enemies as possible, while their other weapon skill rely on hitting one enemy as hard as possible.[[/labelnote]]

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* ReplacementScrappy: When early info about ''The Drowned City'' was released, and fans learned the original classes wouldn't return, Gladiators were blasted as being generic and vastly inferior 'replacements' for the Dark Hunter class, despite players not knowing anything about it beyond the physical appearance of ''one'' representative. Thankfully, this reaction died down over time.
**
Even funnier when you finally found out that Gladiator is supposed to replace the ''Landsknecht'' instead. [[labelnote:note]]The Princess gets the Landsknecht's ability to equip heavy armor, while the Gladiator is a straight combatant; while their armor choices emulate Dark Hunters, they generally lack the ability to dole out status effects unless they invest in Stun Attack. But in turn, when compared to Landsknechts, both classes can specialize in two weapons: Sword and Axe/Hammer, and their sword skills rely on hitting as many enemies as possible, while their other weapon skill rely on hitting one enemy as hard as possible.[[/labelnote]][[/labelnote]] Thankfully, this reaction died down over time.



** The 3DS games allow you to scan QR codes for a variety of purposes, such as items and exchanging Guild Cards (which can also be exchanged via [=StreetPass=]). However, In ''Beyond the Myth'' and ''Nexus, they have a few problems:

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** The 3DS games allow you to scan QR codes for a variety of purposes, such as items and exchanging Guild Cards (which can also be exchanged via [=StreetPass=]). However, In ''Beyond the Myth'' and ''Nexus, ''Nexus'', they have a few problems:



*** The QR codes are not [[UsefulNotes/RegionCoding not cross-region compatible]], not even between NA and EU/AUS copies.[[note]]Usually, 3DS games' PlayerDataSharing (including [=StreetPass=] and multiplayer) are compatible between NA and EU, but NA and EU cannot exchange or connect with Japan- or Korea-region copies. This is likely because NA and EU [=3DSes=] have the same script available for textual player input, but [=3DSes=] released for Japanese and Korean markets also have the appropriate scripts available for their target countries, and issues would likely arise if an NA- or EU-region game had to process text written in kana, kanji, or hangeul. As such, it comes off as a shock that NA and EU players for ''EOV'' can't share data with each other.[[/note]]

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*** The QR codes are not [[UsefulNotes/RegionCoding not cross-region compatible]], not even between NA and EU/AUS copies.[[note]]Usually, 3DS games' PlayerDataSharing (including [=StreetPass=] and multiplayer) are compatible between NA and EU, but NA and EU cannot exchange or connect with Japan- or Korea-region copies. This is likely because NA and EU [=3DSes=] have the same script available for textual player input, but [=3DSes=] released for Japanese and Korean markets also have the appropriate scripts available for their target countries, and issues would likely arise if an NA- or EU-region game had to process text written in kana, kanji, or hangeul. As such, it comes off as a shock that NA and EU players for ''EOV'' can't share data with each other.[[/note]]



** ''Beyond the Myth'' has portrait DLC...that can only be used on new characters and apprentice characters that replace retired ones. So you buy the base game or get the demo, break in a fresh party, only to find that your level 10 units can't get that cool school uniform portrait. While there are items to get a new character to level 20 immediately, it's a waste to use one of those rare items just to have a character that's the same as an existing one with a new portrait. ''Nexus'' fixes this by letting you change an existing character's portrait to another one, including the DLC portraits, any time you want.

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** ''Beyond the Myth'' has portrait DLC... that can only be used on new characters and apprentice characters that replace retired ones. So you buy the base game or get the demo, break in a fresh party, only to find that your level 10 units can't get that cool school uniform portrait. While there are items to get a new character to level 20 immediately, it's a waste to use one of those rare items just to have a character that's the same as an existing one with a new portrait. ''Nexus'' fixes this by letting you change an existing character's portrait to another one, including the DLC portraits, any time you want.


** Wynne's lady boner[[labelnote:Explanation]]In ''EOIV'', Wynne, who's the clerk of the local shop, explains that she's "gotta lady boner harder dan steel" for equipment. Some players wonder [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar how the heck that managed to slip past the ESRB, which rated the game only a T (Teen)]]. Other players read the [[http://www.esrb.org/ratings/Synopsis.aspx?Certificate=32698&Title=Etrian+Odyssey+IV%3a+Legends+of+the+Titan full ESRB notice]] and find the ESRB's direct quote of this exact line amusing.[[/labelnote]]

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** Wynne's lady boner[[labelnote:Explanation]]In ''EOIV'', Wynne, who's the clerk of the local shop, explains that she's "gotta lady boner harder dan steel" for equipment. Some players wonder [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar how the heck that managed to slip past the ESRB, which rated the game only a T (Teen)]].(Teen). Other players read the [[http://www.esrb.org/ratings/Synopsis.aspx?Certificate=32698&Title=Etrian+Odyssey+IV%3a+Legends+of+the+Titan full ESRB notice]] and find the ESRB's direct quote of this exact line amusing.[[/labelnote]]


** Even funnier when you finally found out that Gladiator is supposed to replace ''Landsknecht'' instead. [[labelnote:note]]The Princess gets the Landsknecht's ability to equip heavy armor, while the Gladiator is a straight combatant; while their armor choices emulate Dark Hunters, they generally lack the ability to dole out status effects unless they invest in Stun Attack. But in turn, when compared to Landsknechts, both classes can specialize in two weapons: Sword and Axe/Hammer, and their sword skills rely on hitting as many enemies as possible, while their other weapon skill rely on hitting one enemy as hard as possible.[[/labelnote]]

to:

** Even funnier when you finally found out that Gladiator is supposed to replace the ''Landsknecht'' instead. [[labelnote:note]]The Princess gets the Landsknecht's ability to equip heavy armor, while the Gladiator is a straight combatant; while their armor choices emulate Dark Hunters, they generally lack the ability to dole out status effects unless they invest in Stun Attack. But in turn, when compared to Landsknechts, both classes can specialize in two weapons: Sword and Axe/Hammer, and their sword skills rely on hitting as many enemies as possible, while their other weapon skill rely on hitting one enemy as hard as possible.[[/labelnote]][[/labelnote]]
* TheScrappy: Kujura from ''The Drowned City'' is not well-liked due to his condescending attitude towards your guild, along with his annoying tendency to block off parts of the strata until you accept a mission from the Senatus. [[spoiler:As such, those who side with the Deep City find great satisfaction in [[TakeThatScrappy killing him]] within the fifth stratum.]]

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* SequelDifficultyDrop: ''Legends of the Titan'' is significantly easier than the previous three, though they try to mask it by increasing the encounter rate by a lot. ''The Fafnir Knight'' is also much, much, much easier than both ''Heroes of High Lagaard'' and ''The Millennium Girl'' even on Classic, with it trying to by masked by upping the HP of enemies through the roof... and nothing else.


*** There was particular ire with one item of [=DLC=] unlocking [[CensorSteam nude portraits]] for Story Mode's two female characters, especially considering that one of the characters is ''twelve''.

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*** There was particular ire with one item of [=DLC=] unlocking [[CensorSteam nude semi-nude portraits]] for Story Mode's two female characters, especially considering that one of the characters is ''twelve''.

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* ValuesDissonance: The hot springs DLC in ''Fafnir'' have, in addition to one for Arianna, a fanservice portrait for ten year-old Chloe. Not only is this creepy enough as it is, the art book gleefully mentions that the art team was in love with this portrait, even claiming Chloe "seduced" them. Even if the entire thing were an elaborate inside joke, it would '''not''' fly in other countries where pedophilia is taken seriously.


** The Medic's Immunize skill in the same game. It was intended to reduce only [[FireIceLightning elemental damage]], according to the in-game description. However, the different physical attack types (Pierce, Slash, and Bash) were considered element types as well, turning it into a well-known Game Breaker. It was cut in ''Heroes of Lagaard'', then made its reappearance ''The Millennium Girl'' after it was fixed.

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** The Medic's Immunize skill in the same game. It was intended to reduce only [[FireIceLightning elemental damage]], according to the in-game description. However, the different physical attack reduces all damage types (Pierce, Slash, and Bash) were considered element types as well, turning it into by a well-known Game Breaker. massive amount, especially when boosted. It was cut in ''Heroes of Lagaard'', then made its reappearance ''The Millennium Girl'' after it was fixed.with nerfed damage reduction and only applying to elementals.

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** The chime for Swashbuckling activating.


** The game's AlternativeCalendar has never been explored in any way other than being a way to keep track of time in a way that's more flavorful than "Day ''x''". Conspicuously, the final month, Summoner, is a ''one-day month'', unlike all of the other months which have 28 days, but as far as what's known of the game's canon is concerned, it's a perfectly normal month/day like all of the other 13 months and 364 days.

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** The game's AlternativeCalendar has never been explored in any way other than being a way to keep track of time in a way that's more flavorful than "Day ''x''". Conspicuously, the final month, Summoner, is a ''one-day month'', unlike all of the other months which have 28 days, but as far as what's known of the game's canon is concerned, it's a perfectly normal month/day like all of the other 13 12 months and 364 days.

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