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* EnemyExchangeProgram: Played straight and averted in the series. In the first two games, once you occupy an enemy city (without pillaging or sacking it) you can produce any units that the enemy could in that city, including special units that are specific to the enemy side and otherwise unavailable to you. In the third game captured cities cannot produce those special units unless your side is already capable of doing so.
* EvilCounterpartRace: The games, as well as having High Elves and Dark Elves, has Dwarves and Dark Dwarves, the former being the typical ale-swilling axe-bearers, the latter being industrial {{Mad Scientist}}s.



* MassiveRaceSelection: [=WBC1=] had nine races (Human, Dwarf, Undead, Barbarian, Minotaur, Orc, High Elf, Wood Elf, Dark Elf), arranged on a chart whose columns were "civilized", "barbaric", and "magical" and whose rows were "good", "neutral", and "evil". [=WBC2=] added three new races, which can be unofficially sorted into a new "chaotic" column: Fey, Dark Dwarves, and Daemons. [=WBC3=] almost completely abandoned the theme, splitting Humans into Empire and Knights and adding Ssrathi (Mayincatec Snake People), Swarm, and Plaguelords. By the end of the series, that's a grand total of 16 almost completely unique factions drawn from 11 races (of which there are three kinds of human, three kinds of elf, and two kinds of dwarf), with hardly a shared unit or building to be found.


* CompetitiveMultiplayer: One of the earliest games of this kind.



* EnemyExchangeProgram: Played straight and averted in the series. In the first two games, once you occupy an enemy city (without pillaging or sacking it) you can produce any units that the enemy could in that city, including special units that are specific to the enemy side and otherwise unavailable to you. In the third game captured cities cannot produce those special units unless your side is already capable of doing so.
* EvilCounterpartRace: The games, as well as having High Elves and Dark Elves, has Dwarves and Dark Dwarves, the former being the typical ale-swilling axe-bearers, the latter being industrial {{Mad Scientist}}s.
* {{Fireballs}}: The game had the players trying to break down each other's forts with fireballs - put into play by a flying dragon - which could be bounced off the players' shields and even ''caught'' on them, but would blast bricks out of a wall.
-->There be warlords of brawn and might\\
Defending their crowns of gold;\\
Beware the power of The Black Knight,\\
A power-hungry foe!\\
The dragons spit their fireballs:\\
Warlords! Hold up your shields!\\
'Tis time to protect your castle walls\\
Until The Black Knight yields.
* MassiveRaceSelection: [=WBC1=] had nine races (Human, Dwarf, Undead, Barbarian, Minotaur, Orc, High Elf, Wood Elf, Dark Elf), arranged on a chart whose columns were "civilized", "barbaric", and "magical" and whose rows were "good", "neutral", and "evil". [=WBC2=] added three new races, which can be unofficially sorted into a new "chaotic" column: Fey, Dark Dwarves, and Daemons. [=WBC3=] almost completely abandoned the theme, splitting Humans into Empire and Knights and adding Ssrathi (Mayincatec Snake People), Swarm, and Plaguelords. By the end of the series, that's a grand total of 16 almost completely unique factions drawn from 11 races (of which there are three kinds of human, three kinds of elf, and two kinds of dwarf), with hardly a shared unit or building to be found.



* JustForFun/XMeetsY: ''VideoGame/{{Breakout}}'' meets ''VideoGame/{{Pong}}''.

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* JustForFun/XMeetsY: ''VideoGame/{{Breakout}}'' meets ''VideoGame/{{Pong}}''.


* XMeetsY: ''VideoGame/{{Breakout}}'' meets ''VideoGame/{{Pong}}''.

to:

* XMeetsY: JustForFun/XMeetsY: ''VideoGame/{{Breakout}}'' meets ''VideoGame/{{Pong}}''.


* BreakingOut

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* %%* BreakingOut



* PlayerVersusPlayer

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%%* PlayerVersusPlayer
* PlayerVersusPlayerXMeetsY: ''VideoGame/{{Breakout}}'' meets ''VideoGame/{{Pong}}''.


* TheEighties

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* TheEightiesCoversAlwaysLie: That knight on the UsefulNotes/Atari2600 boxart doesn't resemble anything that actually is in the game.


Warlords is a 1980 video game. The players control a spinner controller to use shields to defend their castle walls from the fireballs that ricochet around the playfield. Players can capture and catapult the fireballs at opposing castles. Fireballs destroy pieces of the castle walls they hit. Essentially, it's four-player ''Breakout'', where you're trying to break through your opponents' walls while protecting yours.

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Warlords [[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/warlords1170.JPG]]

''Warlords''
is a 1980 video game. The players control a spinner controller to use shields to defend their castle walls from the fireballs that ricochet around the playfield. Players can capture and catapult the fireballs at opposing castles. Fireballs destroy pieces of the castle walls they hit. Essentially, it's four-player ''Breakout'', where you're trying to break through your opponents' walls while protecting yours.





WARNING: This game gets ''extremely'' competitive. Surprisingly so for a game that's OlderThanTheNES, which explains why it was released for XboxLiveArcade ''twice''.

to:

WARNING: This game gets ''extremely'' competitive. Surprisingly so for a game that's OlderThanTheNES, which explains why it was released for XboxLiveArcade UsefulNotes/XboxLiveArcade ''twice''.


* AtariTwentySixHundred

Added DiffLines:

* BreakingOut

Added DiffLines:

Not to be confused with the ''Warlords'' series of turn-based strategy games for the PC, made from 1989 to 2003.


Warlords is an 1980 video game. The players control a spinner controller to use shields to defend their castle walls from the fireballs that ricochet around the playfield. Players can capture and catapult the fireballs at opposing castles. Fireballs destroy pieces of the castle walls they hit. Essentially, it's four-player ''Breakout'', where you're trying to break through your opponents' walls while protecting yours.

to:

Warlords is an a 1980 video game. The players control a spinner controller to use shields to defend their castle walls from the fireballs that ricochet around the playfield. Players can capture and catapult the fireballs at opposing castles. Fireballs destroy pieces of the castle walls they hit. Essentially, it's four-player ''Breakout'', where you're trying to break through your opponents' walls while protecting yours.


WARNING: This game gets ''extremely'' competitive. Surprisingly so for a game that's OlderThanTheNES, which explains it was released for XboxLiveArcade ''twice''.

to:

WARNING: This game gets ''extremely'' competitive. Surprisingly so for a game that's OlderThanTheNES, which explains why it was released for XboxLiveArcade ''twice''.


WARNING: This game gets ''extremely'' competitive. Surprisingly so for a game that's OlderThanTheNES.

to:

WARNING: This game gets ''extremely'' competitive. Surprisingly so for a game that's OlderThanTheNES.OlderThanTheNES, which explains it was released for XboxLiveArcade ''twice''.

Added DiffLines:

Warlords is an 1980 video game. The players control a spinner controller to use shields to defend their castle walls from the fireballs that ricochet around the playfield. Players can capture and catapult the fireballs at opposing castles. Fireballs destroy pieces of the castle walls they hit. Essentially, it's four-player ''Breakout'', where you're trying to break through your opponents' walls while protecting yours.

The objective of the game is to destroy the three other castles while protecting one's own castle with the moving shield. When the button is depressed, the shield can capture a fireball. Release the button and the fireball is catapulted at the opponents. The spinning fireballs released from a shield have more destructive force on a castle wall than a fireball simply deflected from another wall or the sides of the playfield. Fireballs cannot be held long since they slowly destroy the player's own castle walls adjacent to the fireball. Additional fireballs appear at predetermined intervals or when a castle is destroyed, whichever comes first. A maximum of four fireballs can simultaneously be in play.

The computer controls all the unpaid castles. In one- and two-player games, if a paid player has the surviving castle, the game continues with a new battle at a higher level. In the higher levels, computer opponents play more accurately and faster. Two-player games can be played jointly (to maximize score/level) or competitively.

WARNING: This game gets ''extremely'' competitive. Surprisingly so for a game that's OlderThanTheNES.
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!!''Warlords'' has examples of:
* AtariTwentySixHundred
* TheEighties
* PlayerVersusPlayer
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