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* Revolver: For a time, the revolver was the sidearm of choice for many people, used in the times of TheWildWest up to World War II, eventually being replaced by semi-automatic weaponry. Put simply, it features several separate chambers for each bullet, arranged in a circle that can simple rotate to ready the next round. Revolvers have been out of favor with most world militaries for more than a century now, their only real domain being large bore big game handgun hunting.

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* Revolver: For a time, the revolver was the sidearm of choice for many people, used in the times of TheWildWest up to World War II, eventually being replaced by semi-automatic weaponry. Put simply, it features several separate chambers for each bullet, arranged in a circle that can simple simply rotate to ready the next round. Revolvers have been out of favor with most world militaries for more than a century now, their only real domain being large bore big game handgun hunting.



* Sword: Numerous variants exist, from the Japanese katana to the European Rapier, but one thing is common: a short hilt, followed by a long one or two edged blade. Swords can be either straight or curved. Curved blades like the katana or scimitar serve as cutting weapons. Normally used against lightly armored or unarmored opponents. Cutting swords were ineffective against metal armor, but thrusts could break through mail and slide between plate gaps. Swords required better and more materials and superior craftsmanship compared to polearms or blunt weapons, and so were more often the preserve of the elite, upper-class, or simply professional soldiers (where the sword would hopefully pay for itself).

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* Sword: Numerous variants exist, from the Japanese katana to the European Rapier, rapier, but one thing is common: a short hilt, followed by a long one or two edged blade. Swords can be either straight or curved. Curved blades like the katana or scimitar serve as cutting weapons. Normally used against lightly armored or unarmored opponents. Cutting swords were ineffective against metal armor, but thrusts could break through mail and slide between plate gaps. Swords required better and more materials and superior craftsmanship compared to polearms or blunt weapons, and so were more often the preserve of the elite, upper-class, or simply professional soldiers (where the sword would hopefully pay for itself).



** Daggers and Dirks: The more ancient equivalent of the above, used as a back up weapon by those who can afford it, a concealed weapon by assassins, or even as a primary form of armament by a poor man which would have had difficulty getting his hands on a larger weapon. Unlike the single edged knives, suited for both slashing and stabbing, these double edged blades were instead optimized purely for stabbing, typically to allow them to pierce armor, which they did quite well assuming one could get close enough to make use the the dagger's limited reach.

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** Daggers and Dirks: The more ancient equivalent of the above, used as a back up weapon by those who can afford it, a concealed weapon by assassins, or even as a primary form of armament by a poor man which would have had difficulty getting his hands on a larger weapon. Unlike the single edged knives, suited for both slashing and stabbing, these double edged blades were instead optimized purely for stabbing, typically to allow them to pierce armor, which they did quite well assuming one could get close enough to make use the of the dagger's limited reach.



** Quarterstaff: essentially a long piece of whatever material is available; the Blade Onna Stick without the blade.

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** Quarterstaff: essentially a long piece of whatever material is available; the Blade Onna Stick without minus the blade.



* Bow and Arrow: The Mongol recurve bow, the English longbow, the Japanese daikyu -- almost every culture has its own variant. The bow uses recoil tension to shoot an arrow (or volley thereof) at the enemy. Usually made from wood, but the Mongol recurve bow could be made of horn. The string could be made of various materials such as sinew. The bow could be shot from horseback or from a chariot. Training for archers took a very long time, because you both have to train a bowman to be able to make hits, but you also have to condition their body to be capable of using a bow for hours. Skeletons of English longbowmen show that their upper bodies had heavier bones on account of the insane training needed by archers. Despite what anime may make you believe, war bows required far more strength and skill to use than any other weapon in history.

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* Bow and Arrow: The Mongol recurve bow, the English longbow, the Japanese daikyu -- almost every culture has its own variant. The bow uses recoil tension to shoot an arrow (or volley thereof) at the enemy. Usually made from wood, but the Mongol recurve bow could be made of horn. The string could be made of various materials such as sinew. The bow could be shot from horseback or from a chariot. Training for archers took a very long time, because you both have to train a bowman to be able to make hits, but you also have to condition their body to be capable of using a bow for hours. Skeletons of English longbowmen show that their upper bodies had heavier bones on account of the insane training needed by archers. Despite what anime may make you believe, war bows required far more strength and skill to use than any other weapon in history. It was said that to train a proper bowman, you had to start with his grandfather.


** Heavy Machinegun: A step up from the general purpose. These things are almost always mounted on vehicles or implacements rather than carried, on account of the lightest of them starting at about 75 pounds before ammo and mounts. These things can destroy cover, men, and ligther armored vehicles from hundreds of meters away. They used calibers such as 12.7x99mm (50 BMG), 12.7x108mm, and 14.5x114mm. Examples: Browning M2, [=DShK=], KPV, Kord, NSV.

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** Heavy Machinegun: A step up from the general purpose. These things are almost always mounted on vehicles or implacements rather than carried, on account of the lightest of them starting at about 75 pounds before ammo and mounts. These things can destroy cover, men, and ligther lighter armored vehicles from hundreds of meters away. They used calibers such as 12.7x99mm (50 BMG), 12.7x108mm, and 14.5x114mm. Examples: Browning M2, [=DShK=], KPV, Kord, NSV.



** Personal Defense Weapon: The PDW is an attempt at giving new life to the SMG by creating new rounds to defeat armor in a bid to appeal to militaries with non-combat personnel who nevertheless might need to fight, such as truck drivers and artillerymen. The PDW concept has been a commercial flop for several reasons. Firstly, compact assault rifles are just better and easier for militaries. Secondly, everything about them is propreitary; proprietary magazines, ammo, parts... Thirdly, PDW rounds (5.7x28 and 4.6x30) are both tiny and lack stopping power. Fourthly, armor-piercing ammunition for the already long-established calibers such as 7.62x25, 9x18, and 9x19, all of which are far more lethal and economical and versatile than the newcommers.

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** Personal Defense Weapon: The PDW is an attempt at giving new life to the SMG by creating new rounds to defeat armor in a bid to appeal to militaries with non-combat personnel who nevertheless might need to fight, such as truck drivers and artillerymen. The PDW concept has been a commercial flop for several reasons. Firstly, compact assault rifles are just better and easier for militaries. Secondly, everything about them is propreitary; proprietary; proprietary magazines, ammo, parts... Thirdly, PDW rounds (5.7x28 and 4.6x30) are both tiny and lack stopping power. Fourthly, armor-piercing ammunition for the already long-established calibers such as 7.62x25, 9x18, and 9x19, all of which are far more lethal and economical and versatile than the newcommers.newcomers.



** Machine pistol: A fully-automatic pistol. Pretty much the poster child for AwesomeButImpractical. Of only extemely specialized use. Examples: Stechkin, Vz 68.

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** Machine pistol: A fully-automatic pistol. Pretty much the poster child for AwesomeButImpractical. Of only extemely extremely specialized use. Examples: Stechkin, Vz 68.



* Sword: Numerous variants exist, from the Japanese katana to the European Rapier, but one thing is common: a short hilt, followed by a long one or two edged blade. Swords can be either straight or curved. Curved blades like the katana or scimitar serve as cutting weapons. Normally used against lightly armoured or unarmored opponents. Cutting swords were ineffective against metal armor, but thrusts could break through mail and slide between plate gaps. Swords required better and more materials and superior craftsmanship compared to polearms or blunt weapons, and so were more often the preserve of the elite, upper-class, or simply professional soldiers (where the sword would hopefully pay for itself).

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* Sword: Numerous variants exist, from the Japanese katana to the European Rapier, but one thing is common: a short hilt, followed by a long one or two edged blade. Swords can be either straight or curved. Curved blades like the katana or scimitar serve as cutting weapons. Normally used against lightly armoured armored or unarmored opponents. Cutting swords were ineffective against metal armor, but thrusts could break through mail and slide between plate gaps. Swords required better and more materials and superior craftsmanship compared to polearms or blunt weapons, and so were more often the preserve of the elite, upper-class, or simply professional soldiers (where the sword would hopefully pay for itself).


* Light Machine Gun: Squad level support weapon. Some models use the same ammunition as assault rifles, while others use full powered rifle ammunition. Some of the smaller caliber designs, like the RPK, feed from service rifle box magazines, and may even be adapted from the service rifle mechanism. In addition to the RPK, the MG 36, L86A1 LSW, and Type 95 are examples of this type. There are also heavier, purpose built light machine guns, which typically feed from longer belts. This family includes the FN Minimi, the MG4, and the RPD.

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* Light Machine Gun: Squad level support weapon. Some models use the same ammunition as assault rifles, while others use full powered rifle ammunition. Some of the smaller caliber designs, like the RPK, feed from service rifle box magazines, and may even be adapted from the service rifle mechanism. In addition to the RPK, the MG 36, L86A1 [=L86A1=] LSW, and Type 95 are examples of this type. There are also heavier, purpose built light machine guns, which typically feed from longer belts. This family includes the FN Minimi, the MG4, [=MG4=], and the RPD.



** Machine pistol: A fully-automatic pistol. Pretty much the poster child for AwesomeButImpractical. Of only extemely specialized use. Examples: Stechkin, Vz68.

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** Machine pistol: A fully-automatic pistol. Pretty much the poster child for AwesomeButImpractical. Of only extemely specialized use. Examples: Stechkin, Vz68.Vz 68.


* Assault Rifle: Common infantry rifle of the modern military. Defining characteristics: Fires an intermediate caliber round (round in power between handgun ammunition and full power rifle ammunition), select fire, and feeds from detachable magazines. Designed, or at least optimized for fighting within 300 meters. Most examples have two fire modes: semiautomatic and fully automatic. Examples include the [=M16=], AKM, Steyr AUG, [=AR18=], F2000, Vz58...

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* Assault Rifle: Common infantry rifle of the modern military. Defining characteristics: Fires an intermediate caliber round (round in power between handgun ammunition and full power rifle ammunition), select fire, and feeds from detachable magazines. Designed, or at least optimized for fighting within 300 meters. Most examples have two fire modes: semiautomatic and fully automatic. Examples include the [=M16=], AKM, Steyr AUG, [=AR18=], F2000, Vz58...Vz 58...


** Throwing, Francisca, tomahawks sometimes: Axes made specifically for throwing. These axes were relatively uncommon, since throwing your main form of defense away was less than ideal more often than not, and throwing was generally reserved for spears and javelins outside of some niche cases.



** Throwing Axe: Like above, but with an axe. The limitations are similar, with the primary difference being that the axe would cause greater damage to a target, while a fighter could carry more throwing knives. It also saw more use on the battlefield for whatever reason.
*** The reason is that an axe, even light throwing axe, like francisca, has enough weight to deliver damage, even if it heats the target with a handle or not-sharpened part of the head. Also quite effective at breaking shields in shield walls before charge. And, finally, can be used as a backup melee weapon easily, unlike throwing knifes.

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** * Throwing Axe: Like above, but with an axe. The limitations are similar, with the primary difference being that the axe would cause greater damage to a target, while a fighter could carry more throwing knives. It also saw An axe has even more use on the battlefield for whatever reason.
*** The reason is that an axe, even light throwing axe, like francisca, has enough
precise weight to deliver damage, distribution than a knife, so even if it heats hits the target with a handle or not-sharpened part of the head. head, it'll still bruise or disorient where a thrown knife might simply glance off harmlessly. Also quite effective at breaking shields in shield walls before charge. And, finally, can be used as a backup charge, and is generally more useful when pressed into melee weapon easily, unlike combat than a throwing knifes. knife.


** Horseman/Cavalry Axe, Sagaris: A larger axe generally made entirely of metal, instead of having a wooden shaft. These heavy axes are technically one-handed, made to combine the weight distribution of an axe with the force of a charging horse, or the gravity from high on horseback. One of the few axe variants sometimes made with a handguard, since you won't be doing much choking up on it from the back of a mount.

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** Horseman/Cavalry Axe, Sagaris: A larger axe generally made entirely of metal, instead of having a wooden shaft. These heavy axes are technically one-handed, made to combine the weight distribution of an axe with the force of a charging horse, or the gravity from high on horseback. One of the few axe variants sometimes made with a handguard, since you won't be doing much choking up on it from the back of a mount. Also the only axe that was wielded how you typically picture a battle-axe to be wielded.


* Axes: Contrary to popular belief, a weapon made for slicing and dicing, not chopping and cleaving. They do it just as well as a sword, for less than half the price, materials, and training (And, consequently, significantly less prestige). Extremely reliable, cheap to fix, and works wonders as a combat hook to trip enemies or control their weapons. May serve double duty as a tool, in some cases. Ranges in size from "throwable" to "this counts as a polearm." Affix the top of the axe with a point for stabbing, and you essentially have a sword that doubles as a hook.

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* Axes: Contrary to popular belief, a weapon made for slicing and dicing, not chopping and cleaving. They do it just as well as a sword, for less than half the price, materials, and training (And, consequently, significantly less prestige). Extremely reliable, cheap to fix, and works wonders as a combat hook to trip enemies or control their weapons. May serve double duty as a tool, in some cases. Ranges in size from "throwable" to "this counts as a polearm." Affix the top of the axe with a point for stabbing, and you essentially have a sword that doubles as a hook. Never was actually symmetrical/double bladed, except in one specific case during the Bronze Age known as the Labrys.


** Hatchet, tomahawk, boarding axe: Smaller axes made specifically to serve as tools in the off-hours, hunting food, whittling wood, cutting branches or ropes, and skinning animals. Often depicted as being dual wielded, but this was less than practical, although some Native American martial art styles involve dual wielding a tomahawk with a knife. The only axe that still sees limited modern military use, for it's survival utility.
** One-handed axe: With less prestige than a sword, most axes go unnamed. Such is the most common variant, which can only be called one-handed. Often found accompanying a shield, and the two are extremely effective when combined. Was also extremely useful ''against'' shields; where spears and swords get stuck, an axe breaks wooden shields with gusto.
** Horseman/Cavalry Axe: A larger axe generally made entirely of metal, instead of having a wooden shaft. These heavy axes are technically one-handed, made to combine the weight distribution of an axe with the force of a charging horse, or the gravity from high on horseback. One of the few axe variants sometimes made with a handguard, since you won't be doing much choking up on it from the back of a mount.
** Dane-axe, bardiche, Shepherd's Axe, two-handed axe, etc: The big boys that weren't as big or as heavy as you think. Generally, this was as big as an axe could get without being considered a polearm. Deceptively light with a wide range of combat utility, the two-handed axe is one of the reasons Vikings were thought to be monstrous in combat.

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** Hatchet, tomahawk, keteriya, boarding axe: Smaller axes made specifically to serve as tools in the off-hours, hunting food, whittling wood, cutting branches or ropes, and skinning animals. Often depicted as being dual wielded, but this was less than practical, although some Native American martial art styles involve dual wielding a tomahawk with a knife. The only axe that still sees limited modern military use, for it's survival utility.
** Throwing, Francisca, tomahawks sometimes: Axes made specifically for throwing. These axes were relatively uncommon, since throwing your main form of defense away was less than ideal more often than not, and throwing was generally reserved for spears and javelins outside of some niche cases.
** One-handed axe: axe, Ono, Labrys, Yue: With less prestige than a sword, most regular axes go unnamed. Such is the most common variant, which can only be called one-handed.one-handed more often than not. Often found accompanying a shield, and the two are extremely effective when combined. Was also extremely useful ''against'' shields; where spears and swords get stuck, an axe breaks wooden shields with gusto.
** Horseman/Cavalry Axe: Axe, Sagaris: A larger axe generally made entirely of metal, instead of having a wooden shaft. These heavy axes are technically one-handed, made to combine the weight distribution of an axe with the force of a charging horse, or the gravity from high on horseback. One of the few axe variants sometimes made with a handguard, since you won't be doing much choking up on it from the back of a mount.
** Dane-axe, bardiche, Parashu, Shepherd's Axe, two-handed axe, etc: The big boys that weren't as big or as heavy as you think. Generally, this was as big as an axe could get without being considered a polearm. Deceptively light with a wide range of combat utility, the two-handed axe is one of the reasons Vikings were thought to be monstrous in combat.


** Horseman/Cavalry Axe: A larger axe generally made entirely of metal, instead of having a wooden shaft. These heavy axes are technically one-handed, made for cavalry to drop on enemies from the height of horseback. One of the few axe variants sometimes made with a handguard, since you won't be doing much choking up on it from the back of a mount.

to:

** Horseman/Cavalry Axe: A larger axe generally made entirely of metal, instead of having a wooden shaft. These heavy axes are technically one-handed, made for cavalry to drop on enemies combine the weight distribution of an axe with the force of a charging horse, or the gravity from the height of high on horseback. One of the few axe variants sometimes made with a handguard, since you won't be doing much choking up on it from the back of a mount.


** Horseman/Cavalry Axe: A larger axe generally made entirely of metal, instead of having a wooden shaft. These heavy axes are technically one-handed, made for cavalry to drop on enemies from the height of horseback. One of the few axe variants made with a handguard, since you won't be doing much choking up on it from the back of a mount.

to:

** Horseman/Cavalry Axe: A larger axe generally made entirely of metal, instead of having a wooden shaft. These heavy axes are technically one-handed, made for cavalry to drop on enemies from the height of horseback. One of the few axe variants sometimes made with a handguard, since you won't be doing much choking up on it from the back of a mount.


* Polearms: Simply put, BladeOnAStick. This can be a spear, glaive, halberd, naginata or axe. Polearms were the primary weapon of pre-industrial militaries, not swords, contrary to popular belief. Swords require a good deal of metal and time to forge them well, and even more time to learn/teach someone to use effectively. Although intricate fighting systems such as naginatajutsu exist for polearms, the essence of it on the field was "stick the pointy end into the other guy". Much easier to drill. The modern concept of a bayonet essentially allows a firearm to function as one (if by 'modern' [[OlderThanTheyThink you mean 'since someone noticed longarms were long and a wood/metal mix]]).

to:

* Axes: Contrary to popular belief, a weapon made for slicing and dicing, not chopping and cleaving. They do it just as well as a sword, for less than half the price, materials, and training (And, consequently, significantly less prestige). Extremely reliable, cheap to fix, and works wonders as a combat hook to trip enemies or control their weapons. May serve double duty as a tool, in some cases. Ranges in size from "throwable" to "this counts as a polearm." Affix the top of the axe with a point for stabbing, and you essentially have a sword that doubles as a hook.
** Hatchet, tomahawk, boarding axe: Smaller axes made specifically to serve as tools in the off-hours, hunting food, whittling wood, cutting branches or ropes, and skinning animals. Often depicted as being dual wielded, but this was less than practical, although some Native American martial art styles involve dual wielding a tomahawk with a knife. The only axe that still sees limited modern military use, for it's survival utility.
** One-handed axe: With less prestige than a sword, most axes go unnamed. Such is the most common variant, which can only be called one-handed. Often found accompanying a shield, and the two are extremely effective when combined. Was also extremely useful ''against'' shields; where spears and swords get stuck, an axe breaks wooden shields with gusto.
** Horseman/Cavalry Axe: A larger axe generally made entirely of metal, instead of having a wooden shaft. These heavy axes are technically one-handed, made for cavalry to drop on enemies from the height of horseback. One of the few axe variants made with a handguard, since you won't be doing much choking up on it from the back of a mount.
** Dane-axe, bardiche, Shepherd's Axe, two-handed axe, etc: The big boys that weren't as big or as heavy as you think. Generally, this was as big as an axe could get without being considered a polearm. Deceptively light with a wide range of combat utility, the two-handed axe is one of the reasons Vikings were thought to be monstrous in combat.
* Polearms: Simply put, BladeOnAStick. This can be a spear, glaive, halberd, naginata or axe.pollaxe. Polearms were the primary weapon of pre-industrial militaries, not swords, contrary to popular belief. Swords require a good deal of metal and time to forge them well, and even more time to learn/teach someone to use effectively. Although intricate fighting systems such as naginatajutsu exist for polearms, the essence of it on the field was "stick the pointy end into the other guy". Much easier to drill. The modern concept of a bayonet essentially allows a firearm to function as one (if by 'modern' [[OlderThanTheyThink you mean 'since someone noticed longarms were long and a wood/metal mix]]).



* Axes: chopping implements, either repurposed tools or designed as weapons. Sizes range from "throwable" to "two-handed behemoth". Extend the handle enough and it becomes a sort of blade on a stick as mentioned above.

to:

* Axes: chopping implements, either repurposed tools or designed as weapons. Sizes range from "throwable" to "two-handed behemoth". Extend the handle enough and it becomes a sort of blade on a stick as mentioned above.


** Throwing Axe: Like above, [[CaptainObvious but with an axe]]. The limitations are similar, with the primary difference being that the axe would cause greater damage to a target, while a fighter could carry more throwing knives. It also saw more use on the battlefield for whatever reason.

to:

** Throwing Axe: Like above, [[CaptainObvious but with an axe]].axe. The limitations are similar, with the primary difference being that the axe would cause greater damage to a target, while a fighter could carry more throwing knives. It also saw more use on the battlefield for whatever reason.


* Bow and Arrow: The Mongol recurve bow, the English longbow, the Japanese daikyu -- almost every culture has its own variant. The bow uses recoil tension to fire an arrow (or volley thereof) at the enemy. Usually made from wood, but the Mongol recurve bow could be made of horn. The string could be made of various materials such as sinew. The bow could be shot from horseback or from a chariot. Training for archers took a very long time, because you both have to train a bowman to be able to make hits, but you also have to condition their body to be capable of using a bow for hours. Skeletons of English longbowmen show that their upper bodies had heavier bones on account of the insane training needed by archers. Despite what anime may make you believe, war bows required far more strength and skill to use than any other weapon in history.
** Longbows: made famous by the English, this is pretty much what it sounds like: a larger, longer bow (as tall as the user or taller), with a higher draw strength (the force used to pull the string back). All of this makes the longbow fire greater distances with more force. The weapon of choice for raining arrows in fiction.

to:

* Bow and Arrow: The Mongol recurve bow, the English longbow, the Japanese daikyu -- almost every culture has its own variant. The bow uses recoil tension to fire shoot an arrow (or volley thereof) at the enemy. Usually made from wood, but the Mongol recurve bow could be made of horn. The string could be made of various materials such as sinew. The bow could be shot from horseback or from a chariot. Training for archers took a very long time, because you both have to train a bowman to be able to make hits, but you also have to condition their body to be capable of using a bow for hours. Skeletons of English longbowmen show that their upper bodies had heavier bones on account of the insane training needed by archers. Despite what anime may make you believe, war bows required far more strength and skill to use than any other weapon in history.
** Longbows: made famous by the English, this is pretty much what it sounds like: a larger, longer bow (as tall as the user or taller), with a higher draw strength (the force used to pull the string back). All of this makes the longbow fire shoot greater distances with more force. The weapon of choice for raining arrows in fiction.



** Crossbows: these weapons use the same principle as bows, but crossbows use a trigger mechanism to keep the bowstring taut, ready to fire, for up to several minutes before firing. Heavier crossbows used winches or similar mechanisms to add to the user's strength. AutomaticCrossbows were experimented with by most militaries that issued the normal kind, but never became as widespread outside of China, where they were in use by the military as late as ''1895''.

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** Crossbows: these weapons use the same principle as bows, but crossbows use a trigger mechanism to keep the bowstring taut, ready to fire, shoot, for up to several minutes before firing. Heavier crossbows used winches or similar mechanisms to add to the user's strength. AutomaticCrossbows were experimented with by most militaries that issued the normal kind, but never became as widespread outside of China, where they were in use by the military as late as ''1895''.


* Submachine Gun: Small light weapons generally only effective to one hundred meters. Essentially machine guns which fire pistol rounds. SMG's have fallen out of favor since WW2 on account of assault rifles being able to do everything they can and beyond while not requiring doing logistics for more weapons and calibers. Example: [=PPSh-41=], PPS-43, Uzi, TMP, MP-5, Bizon, L2 Sterling.

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* Submachine Gun: Small light weapons generally only effective to one hundred meters. Essentially machine guns which fire pistol rounds. SMG's have fallen out of favor since WW2 [=WW2=] on account of assault rifles being able to do everything they can and beyond while not requiring doing logistics for more weapons and calibers. Example: [=PPSh-41=], PPS-43, Uzi, TMP, MP-5, Bizon, L2 Sterling.


This is a page that lists the numerous types of weaponry found on the battlefield, whether a modern one or not. Many of these weapon types are actually quite old, even the assault rifle dates back to the [[WorldWarI 1910s]] and was first widely issued in WorldWarII, and the sniper rifle even further back, at least UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, if not further; the actual concept of sniping was invented in [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution the Revolutionary War]].

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This is a page that lists the numerous types of weaponry found on the battlefield, whether a modern one or not. Many of these weapon types are actually quite old, even the assault rifle dates back to the [[WorldWarI [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI 1910s]] and was first widely issued in WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, and the sniper rifle even further back, at least UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, if not further; the actual concept of sniping was invented in [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution the Revolutionary War]].

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