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* BadassBaritone: Subverted: Papageno is a baritone, and the [[SensitiveGuyAndManlyMan Sensitive Guy]] to TenorBoy Tamino's Manly Man.

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* MelismaticVocals: Par for the genre in coloratura arias, but "Der Hölle Rache" is a shining example.


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* TalkingIsAFreeAction: Well, singing is. Papageno and Pamina sing an entire aria about how they must hurry to escape Sarastro's palace, and Tamino and Papageno later sing about how good they are at staying silent.


* DistressedDude: Tamino, the designated hero, who enters screaming and swooning (his first song literally translates to "Help! Help!") and has to be rescued by the three ladies. He gets better over the course of the opera.

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* DistressedDude: Tamino, the designated hero, who enters screaming and swooning (his first song literally translates to line is "Help! Help!") and has to be rescued by the three ladies. He gets better over the course of the opera.


* DamselInDistress: Subverted with Pamina, and played (oddly) near-straight except for gender with Tamino, the designated hero, who enters screaming and swooning (his first song literally translates to "Help! Help!") and has to be rescued by the three ladies. He gets better.

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* DamselInDistress: Subverted with Pamina, and played (oddly) near-straight except for gender with Pamina.
* DistressedDude:
Tamino, the designated hero, who enters screaming and swooning (his first song literally translates to "Help! Help!") and has to be rescued by the three ladies. He gets better.better over the course of the opera.


* DamselInDistress: Subverted with Pamina, and played (oddly) near-straight except for gender with Tamino, the designated hero, who enters screaming and swooning and has to be rescued by the three ladies. He gets better.

to:

* DamselInDistress: Subverted with Pamina, and played (oddly) near-straight except for gender with Tamino, the designated hero, who enters screaming and swooning (his first song literally translates to "Help! Help!") and has to be rescued by the three ladies. He gets better.


* LoveBeforeFirstSight: Tamino and Pamina. Tamino only needs to see Pamina's picture to fall in love.

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* LoveBeforeFirstSight: Tamino and Pamina. Tamino only needs to see Pamina's picture to fall in love.love and Pamina only needs to hear that he loves her and is coming to rescue her.


* InterruptedSuicide: twice.

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* InterruptedSuicide: twice.Twice. First PlayedForDrama with Pamina, then PlayedForLaughs with Papageno.


** Also played with: Papageno and Monostatos flee from each other, believing the other being the devil (Papageno has never seen a black man before, Monostatos because Papageno's appearance is really outlandish). Papageno actually is the first to recover, in one adaptation commenting "There are black birds, why shouldn't there be black men?"

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** Also played with: Papageno and Monostatos flee from each other, believing the other being the devil (Papageno has never seen a black man before, Monostatos because Papageno's appearance is really outlandish). Papageno actually is the first to recover, in one adaptation the uncut libretto commenting "There are black birds, why shouldn't there be black men?"


The last opera Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart ever wrote (''La clemenza di Tito'' was composed after the Flute was started, but before its completion), right after he was initiated into the Freemasons; the libretto is thus rife with that organization's symbolism. ''The Magic Flute'' is actually closer to our understanding of a {{Musical}} than {{Opera}}: it is generally as seen as LighterAndSofter than, say, Creator/RichardWagner's ''[[Theatre/DerRingDesNibelungen The Ring of the Nibelung]]'', and deals more with the themes of ignorance versus wisdom and the virtues of love and family rather than the fall of the gods and the end of the world. Also, being a "''singspiel''," it has dialogue, not just singing. To make a long story short, this was the Mozartian equivalent of ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', with which it shares a similar level of popularity within its genre.

to:

The last opera Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart ever wrote (''La clemenza di Tito'' was composed after the Flute was started, but before its completion), right after he was initiated into the Freemasons; the libretto is thus rife with that organization's symbolism. ''The Magic Flute'' is actually closer to our understanding of a {{Musical}} than {{Opera}}: it is generally as seen as LighterAndSofter than, say, Creator/RichardWagner's Music/RichardWagner's ''[[Theatre/DerRingDesNibelungen The Ring of the Nibelung]]'', and deals more with the themes of ignorance versus wisdom and the virtues of love and family rather than the fall of the gods and the end of the world. Also, being a "''singspiel''," it has dialogue, not just singing. To make a long story short, this was the Mozartian equivalent of ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', with which it shares a similar level of popularity within its genre.


The action starts with a prince from a foreign land, Tamino, chased onstage by a giant serpent. He faints in the face (teeth) of death, and so does not notice when three [[LadyOfWar Ladies Of War]] show up; the Three Ladies immediately swoon over his MrFanservice good looks and argue over which of them will return to report to their ruler, the Queen of the Night, and which of them will get to stay and, ahem, revive him. Eventually, they make the sensible decision that all three of them return, leaving Tamino alone again. (...Okay, sensibility rescinded.) Tamino awakes in time to meet Papageno, the Queen of the Night's royal bird-catcher, an eccentric fellow frequently costumed in feather-and-beak motifs. He sings a pleasant SidekickSong about his easy-going philosophy and [[IJustWantToBeLoved lack of love life]]. The Three Ladies now return and show Tamino the portrait of a PrincessClassic, Pamina, resulting in LoveAtFirstSight. Then the Queen of the Night herself appears and promises Tamino her daughter Pamina's hand in marriage... ''IF'' Tamino can SaveThePrincess, who has been captured by a guy with the ominous name of Sarastro. The Queen gives Tamino his [[TitleDrop Magic Flute]], Papageno a set of magic bells (both of which have the power to CharmPerson [[MagicMusic when you play them]]), and tour guides in the form of [[CrossDressingVoices Three Young Boys]], and sends them on their way.

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The action starts with a prince from a foreign land, Tamino, chased onstage by a giant serpent. He faints in the face (teeth) of death, and so does not notice when three [[LadyOfWar Ladies Of War]] show up; up to rescue him; the Three Ladies immediately swoon over his MrFanservice good looks and argue over which of them will return to report to their ruler, the Queen of the Night, and which of them will get to stay and, ahem, and (ahem) revive him. Eventually, they make the sensible decision that all three of them return, leaving Tamino alone again. (...Okay, sensibility rescinded.maybe not so sensible.) Tamino awakes in time to meet Papageno, the Queen of the Night's royal bird-catcher, an eccentric fellow frequently costumed in feather-and-beak motifs. He sings a pleasant SidekickSong about his easy-going philosophy and [[IJustWantToBeLoved lack of love life]]. The Three Ladies now return and show Tamino the portrait of a PrincessClassic, Pamina, resulting in LoveAtFirstSight. Then the Queen of the Night herself appears and promises Tamino her daughter Pamina's hand in marriage... ''IF'' Tamino can SaveThePrincess, who has been captured by a guy with the ominous name of Sarastro. The Queen gives Tamino his [[TitleDrop Magic Flute]], Papageno a set of magic bells (both of which have the power to CharmPerson [[MagicMusic when you play them]]), and tour guides in the form of [[CrossDressingVoices Three Young Boys]], and sends them on their way.

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** Sarastro is certainly ''some'' relation to Pamina, or he would have no right to take her from her mother. If he isn't her father, he may be her uncle (father's brother) - or even her ''grandfather''.


* TheOmniscientCouncilOfVagueness: Sarastro and his priests.



* TheOmniscientCouncilOfVagueness: Sarastro and his priests.


The last opera Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart ever wrote (''La clemenza di Tito'' was composed after the Flute was started, but before its completion), right after he was initiated into the Freemasons; the libretto is thus rife with that organization's symbolism. ''The Magic Flute'' is actually closer to our understanding of a {{Musical}} than {{Opera}}: it is generally as seen as LighterAndSofter than, say, Creator/RichardWagner's ''[[Theatre/DerRingDesNibelungen The Ring of the Nibelung]]'', and deals more with the themes of ignorance versus wisdom and the virtues of love and family rather than the fall of the gods and the end of the world. Also, being a "''singspiel''," it has dialogue, not just singing. To make a long story short, this was the Mozartian equivalent of ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', with which it shares a similar level of popularity within its genre.

to:

The last opera Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart Music/WolfgangAmadeusMozart ever wrote (''La clemenza di Tito'' was composed after the Flute was started, but before its completion), right after he was initiated into the Freemasons; the libretto is thus rife with that organization's symbolism. ''The Magic Flute'' is actually closer to our understanding of a {{Musical}} than {{Opera}}: it is generally as seen as LighterAndSofter than, say, Creator/RichardWagner's ''[[Theatre/DerRingDesNibelungen The Ring of the Nibelung]]'', and deals more with the themes of ignorance versus wisdom and the virtues of love and family rather than the fall of the gods and the end of the world. Also, being a "''singspiel''," it has dialogue, not just singing. To make a long story short, this was the Mozartian equivalent of ''Theatre/JosephAndTheAmazingTechnicolorDreamcoat'', with which it shares a similar level of popularity within its genre.


Other adaptations include a ComicBook by P. Craig Russell with an ending that can be best described as trippy, a novelization (''Night's Daughter'') by Creator/MarionZimmerBradley, an Creator/{{ABC}} Weekend Special starring Creator/MarkHamil as Tamino, and ''Magic Flute Diaries'', a film about a performance of ''The Magic Flute''.

to:

Other adaptations include a ComicBook by P. Craig Russell with an ending that can be best described as trippy, a novelization (''Night's Daughter'') by Creator/MarionZimmerBradley, an Creator/{{ABC}} Weekend Special starring Creator/MarkHamil Creator/MarkHamill as Tamino, and ''Magic Flute Diaries'', a film about a performance of ''The Magic Flute''.


Other adaptations include a ComicBook by P. Craig Russell with an ending that can be best described as trippy, a novelization (''Night's Daughter'') by Creator/MarionZimmerBradley, and ''Magic Flute Diaries'', a film about a performance of ''The Magic Flute''.

to:

Other adaptations include a ComicBook by P. Craig Russell with an ending that can be best described as trippy, a novelization (''Night's Daughter'') by Creator/MarionZimmerBradley, an Creator/{{ABC}} Weekend Special starring Creator/MarkHamil as Tamino, and ''Magic Flute Diaries'', a film about a performance of ''The Magic Flute''.

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