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** Played straight if Caesar is sung by a woman.

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** Played straight if Caesar is Caesar, Ptolemy and/or Sextus are sung by a woman.women.

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* LyricalDissonance: Two of Achillas’s arias sound like war songs and are actually (from his point of view, at least) sweet confessions of love.


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* WhyDontYouJustShootHim: Even after he’s finished with his EvilGloating and with no intentions to spare Cleopatra, Ptolemy, for no reason, keeps her alive long enough for Caesar to find and rescue her.

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* WarriorPoet: Caesar is a great conqueror and has all of the most poetic and philosophical arias in the opera.


* WorthyOpponent: Caesar highly admires Pompey’s leadership skills and courage and is ready to reconcile with him.

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* WorthyOpponent: Caesar highly admires Pompey’s leadership skills and courage and is ready to reconcile with him.him.
* YouGotSpunk: In David [=McVicar=]’s production, Achillas finds it endearing when Cornelia pushes him away again and again. When she slaps him so hard he falls back, he grins in delight.

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* FloweryInsults: Caesar sings a six-minute aria where he subtly compares Ptolemy to a hunter setting a snare.

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* DeathbedConfession: Before dying, Achillas tells Sextus and Nirenus that he murdered Pompey and started the coup against Caesar. The audience knew the latter, and the former is more or less easy to figure out, but Sextus, Nirenus and Caesar (who’s listening at a distance) are shocked and disgusted.


* TheVillainSucksSong: Caesar’s ''Empio, diró, tu sei'' – the first verse is directed at Achillas, the second at Ptolemy (though in some productions, like the ENO’s version with Janet Baker, it’s entirely about Ptolemy).

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* TheVillainSucksSong: Caesar’s ''Empio, diró, tu sei'' – the first verse is directed at Achillas, the second at Ptolemy (though in some productions, like the ENO’s version with Janet Baker, it’s entirely about Ptolemy).Ptolemy).
* WorthyOpponent: Caesar highly admires Pompey’s leadership skills and courage and is ready to reconcile with him.


Cornelia and Sextus, attempting to get their revenge, are captured by Ptolemy instead, and Cornelia finds both Ptolemy and Achillas vying for her favors. But Ptolemy makes the mistake of promising Cornelia’s hand to his general and then going back on his word in the most humiliating manner possible, so Achillas switches to Cleopatra’s side. When Caesar and Cleopatra’s army is defeated, the mortally wounded Achillas gives Sextus the ring with the commander’s sigil and tells him where the relief troops are hiding. Caesar, whom everyone thought dead, emerges alive and well, and the tide of the battle turns. Sextus is finally able to kill Pompey, and Caesar crowns Cleopatra as Queen of Egypt.

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Cornelia and Sextus, attempting to get their revenge, are captured by Ptolemy instead, and Cornelia finds both Ptolemy and Achillas vying for her favors. But Ptolemy makes the mistake of promising Cornelia’s hand to his general and then going back on his word in the most humiliating manner possible, so Achillas switches to Cleopatra’s side. When Caesar and Cleopatra’s army is defeated, the mortally wounded Achillas gives Sextus the ring with the commander’s sigil and tells him where the relief troops are hiding. Caesar, whom everyone thought dead, emerges alive and well, and the tide of the battle turns. Sextus is finally able to kill Pompey, Ptolemy, and Caesar crowns Cleopatra as Queen of Egypt.


* SettingUpdate: Done more often than not in modern productions, with the 2005 David [=McVicar=] production moving the plot to the 19th-century India, and the 2013 one from Salzburg – to modern Egypt.

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* SettingUpdate: Done more often than not in modern productions, with the 2005 David [=McVicar=] production moving the plot to India of the 19th-century India, 19th century, and the 2013 one from Salzburg – to modern Egypt.

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* AnachronismStew: Done in the ENO production to imitate the style of Händel's lifetime. Back then, whatever the setting of the plot, men wore armor that had a vaguely Roman look and women wore contemporary dresses.


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* SettingUpdate: Done more often than not in modern productions, with the 2005 David [=McVicar=] production moving the plot to the 19th-century India, and the 2013 one from Salzburg – to modern Egypt.


* PragmaticAdaptation: Sartorio's opera was way longer, had a way more convoluted plot and LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters who are constantly falling in love with/declaring hate for/[[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers changing clothes with each other]]. Haym's removal of many of Bussani's details brings focus to the two main plotlines (Caesar and Cleopatra, Cornelia and Sextus), both dramatically and musically.

to:

* PragmaticAdaptation: Sartorio's opera was way longer, had a way more convoluted plot and LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters who are constantly falling in love with/declaring hate for/[[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers changing clothes with getting disguised as each other]]. Haym's removal of many of Bussani's details brings focus to the two main plotlines (Caesar and Cleopatra, Cornelia and Sextus), both dramatically and musically.


* PragmaticAdaptation: Sartorio's opera was way longer, had a way more convoluted plot and LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters who are constantly falling in love with/declaring hate for/[[TheLastOneIsNotLikeTheOthers changing clothes with each other]]. Haym's removal of many of Bussani's details brings focus to the two main plotlines (Caesar and Cleopatra, Cornelia and Sextus), both dramatically and musically.

to:

* PragmaticAdaptation: Sartorio's opera was way longer, had a way more convoluted plot and LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters who are constantly falling in love with/declaring hate for/[[TheLastOneIsNotLikeTheOthers for/[[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers changing clothes with each other]]. Haym's removal of many of Bussani's details brings focus to the two main plotlines (Caesar and Cleopatra, Cornelia and Sextus), both dramatically and musically.


''Giulio Cesare in Egitto'', often shortened to ''Giulio Cesare'' (''Julius Caesar in Egypt''), is a 1725 opera by Music/GeorgeFredericHandel, considered to be one of his best works and one of the best-known Baroque operas overall nowadays. The libretto by Nicola Haym is a rewrite of an earlier libretto by Giacomo Francesco Bussani (adapted to music by Antonio Sartorio) and is extremely loosely based on the relationship of UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII and UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, and the civil conflict in Egypt in which they were involved.

to:

''Giulio Cesare in Egitto'', often shortened to ''Giulio Cesare'' (''Julius Caesar in Egypt''), is a 1725 opera by Music/GeorgeFredericHandel, considered to be one of his best works and one of the best-known Baroque operas overall nowadays. The libretto by Nicola Haym is a rewrite of an earlier libretto by Giacomo Francesco Bussani (adapted to music by Antonio Sartorio) Sartorio; it's believed Händel used some of his music too when writing his version) and is extremely loosely based on the relationship of UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII and UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, and the civil conflict in Egypt in which they were involved.



* AsYouKnow: For the audience's benefit, Caesar and Curius decide to remind each other who Cornelia is in the beginning of the first act.



* DeathByAdaptation: In Sartorio's opera, Ptolemy is put in chains but not killed.
* DemotedToExtra: Curius was a much more prominent character in Sartorio's opera; in particular, he had several arias. In Händel's, he has a handful of recitatives, and even these are often cut.



* DoggedNiceGuy: Curius, perhaps the only unambiguously nice guy in the whole story, gets repeatedly rejected by Cornelia. In an earlier opera by Sartorio, made to an earlier version of the same libretto, she does accept him in the end, but Händel/Haym‘s version lacks that part.

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* DoggedNiceGuy: Curius, perhaps the only unambiguously nice guy in the whole story, gets repeatedly rejected by Cornelia. In an Sartorio/Bussani's earlier opera by Sartorio, made to an earlier version of the same libretto, version, she does accept him in the end, but Händel/Haym‘s version lacks that part.


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* PragmaticAdaptation: Sartorio's opera was way longer, had a way more convoluted plot and LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters who are constantly falling in love with/declaring hate for/[[TheLastOneIsNotLikeTheOthers changing clothes with each other]]. Haym's removal of many of Bussani's details brings focus to the two main plotlines (Caesar and Cleopatra, Cornelia and Sextus), both dramatically and musically.


''Giulio Cesare in Egitto'', often shortened to ''Giulio Cesare'' (''Julius Caesar in Egypt''), is a 1725 opera by Music/GeorgeFredericHandel, considered to be one of his best works and one of the best-known Baroque operas overall nowadays. The libretto by Nicola Haym is extremely loosely based on the relationship of UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII and UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, and the civil conflict in Egypt in which they were involved.

to:

''Giulio Cesare in Egitto'', often shortened to ''Giulio Cesare'' (''Julius Caesar in Egypt''), is a 1725 opera by Music/GeorgeFredericHandel, considered to be one of his best works and one of the best-known Baroque operas overall nowadays. The libretto by Nicola Haym is a rewrite of an earlier libretto by Giacomo Francesco Bussani (adapted to music by Antonio Sartorio) and is extremely loosely based on the relationship of UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII and UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, and the civil conflict in Egypt in which they were involved.

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* CondescendingCompassion: Cleopatra towards Ptolemy when she tells him that it’s not a big deal he can’t inherit the throne, after all, he still has his harem!

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