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* PlayingGertrude: Sonia Dresdel (Livia) was only three months older than André Morell, who played her son Tiberius.


* UnfortunateName: Agrippa Postumus, whose name is phonetically identical to "posthumous" aka "after-death", and who was thus named because he was born after the death of his father, Marcus Agrippa. Fittingly, he is murdered by his guards at the end of "Augustus", ostensibly on Augustus' orders.

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* UnfortunateName: Agrippa Postumus, whose name is phonetically identical to "posthumous" aka "after-death", and who was thus named because [[SomeoneToRememberHimBy he was born after the death of his father, father]], Marcus Agrippa. Fittingly, he is murdered by his guards at the end of "Augustus", ostensibly on Augustus' orders.


The final two episodes cover the brief but chaotic rule of Tiberius' successor. When Tiberius dies in "Caligula", he names Germanicus' surviving son Gaius Caligula (Ralph Bates) as co-heir with his grandson Gemellus. Caligula presents himself as sole ruler and initially rules benevolently, but after recovering from a severe fever, he becomes violently, even homicidally, insane and [[AGodAmI declares himself a god]] while massacring anyone he sees as a threat, including Gemellus. His murderous reign continues into "Claudius", but his enemies are finally multiplying faster than he can eliminate them, and he is [[BodyguardBetrayal assassinated by the Praetorian Guard]], who declare Germanicus' lame, stammering brother Claudius (Freddie Jones) the new Emperor.

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The final two episodes cover the brief but chaotic rule of Tiberius' successor. When Tiberius dies in "Caligula", he names Germanicus' surviving son Gaius Caligula (Ralph Bates) as co-heir with his grandson Gemellus. Caligula presents himself as sole ruler and initially rules benevolently, but after recovering from a severe fever, he becomes violently, even homicidally, insane and [[AGodAmI declares himself a god]] while massacring anyone he sees as a threat, including Gemellus. His murderous reign continues into "Claudius", but his enemies are finally multiplying faster than he can eliminate them, and he is [[BodyguardBetrayal assassinated by the Praetorian Guard]], who declare Germanicus' lame, stammering brother Claudius (Freddie Jones) (Creator/FreddieJones) the new Emperor.


** Augustus has to deal with one, with his preferred heirs, his grandsons Lucius and Gaius, dead before the series begins. It's implied in the series and agreed by historical sources that Augustus didn't particularly like his stepson Tiberius but saw him as the only suitable heir. In the series, Tiberius himself bitterly remarks that he's been made into a placeholder until Augustus's grandnephew, Germanicus, is old enough to be emperor.

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** Augustus has to deal with one, with his preferred heirs, his grandsons Lucius and Gaius, Gaius (Agrippa Postumus' older brothers), dead before the series begins. It's implied in the series and agreed by historical sources that Augustus didn't particularly like his stepson Tiberius but saw him as the only suitable heir. In the series, Tiberius himself bitterly remarks that he's been made into a placeholder until Augustus's grandnephew, Germanicus, is old enough to be emperor.


* SuccessionCrisis: Tiberius is confronted with one throughout his reign. Initially, he plans to make Germanicus his successor in accordance with Augustus' will. When Germanicus dies in Syria, he names his own son Drusus as his successor, to be followed by Germanicus' son Nero. When Drusus is poisoned and Nero is arrested on trumped up charges of treason by Sejanus and starved to death in captivity, Tiberius names Caligula and Gemellus co-heirs. Caligula accepts, but glosses over the "co-heir" idea and has Gemellus murdered after Tiberius' death.
** Indeed, Augustus has to deal with one too, with his preferred heirs, his grandsons Lucius and Gaius, dead before the series begins. It's implied in the series and agreed by historical sources that Augustus didn't particularly like his stepson Tiberius but saw him as the only suitable heir. In the series, Tiberius himself bitterly remarks that he's been made into a placeholder until Augustus's grandnephew, Germanicus, is old enough to be emperor.

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* SuccessionCrisis: SuccessionCrisis:
** Augustus has to deal with one, with his preferred heirs, his grandsons Lucius and Gaius, dead before the series begins. It's implied in the series and agreed by historical sources that Augustus didn't particularly like his stepson Tiberius but saw him as the only suitable heir. In the series, Tiberius himself bitterly remarks that he's been made into a placeholder until Augustus's grandnephew, Germanicus, is old enough to be emperor.
**
Tiberius is confronted with one throughout his reign. Initially, he plans to make Germanicus his successor in accordance with Augustus' will. When Germanicus dies in Syria, he names his own son Drusus as his successor, to be followed by Germanicus' son Nero. When Drusus is poisoned and Nero is arrested on trumped up charges of treason by Sejanus and starved to death in captivity, Tiberius names Caligula and Gemellus co-heirs. Caligula accepts, but glosses over the "co-heir" idea and has Gemellus murdered after Tiberius' death.
** Indeed, Augustus has to deal with one too, with his preferred heirs, his grandsons Lucius and Gaius, dead before the series begins. It's implied in the series and agreed by historical sources that Augustus didn't particularly like his stepson Tiberius but saw him as the only suitable heir. In the series, Tiberius himself bitterly remarks that he's been made into a placeholder until Augustus's grandnephew, Germanicus, is old enough to be emperor.
death.

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** Indeed, Augustus has to deal with one too, with his preferred heirs, his grandsons Lucius and Gaius, dead before the series begins. It's implied in the series and agreed by historical sources that Augustus didn't particularly like his stepson Tiberius but saw him as the only suitable heir. In the series, Tiberius himself bitterly remarks that he's been made into a placeholder until Augustus's grandnephew, Germanicus, is old enough to be emperor.


* TheExile:
** At the time of "Augustus", the Emperor's grandson Agrippa Postumus has been banished from Rome to the island of Planasia as punishment for his drunken, hell-raising behaviour.
** In "Sejanus", Agrippina is exiled to the island of Pandataria as part of Sejanus' purge of his political opponents. As she has been a thorn in Tiberius' side since he became Emperor, he chooses not to end her exile even after Sejanus is executed for treason.
** After the title character in "Caligula" recovers from his fever and begins seeing enemies everywhere, he has two of his sisters, Julia Livilla and Agrippinilla, banished from Rome for supposedly plotting against him.



* OpportunisticBastard: Sejanus eventually grows into this. In "Sejanus", Tiberius mostly reties to his villa in Capri and leaves the day-to-day running of the Empire in the hands of his right-hand man, who uses his authority to eliminate all of Tiberius' heirs except for his grandson Gemellus, so that he can marry the latter's mother Livilla and rule as regent with her when Gemellus succeeds Tiberius. He also has his political opponents arrested and executed on (mostly forged) treason charges. When Tiberius finds out what Sejanus is doing, he turns the tables on him and has ''him'' arrested and executed for treason.

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* OpportunisticBastard: Sejanus eventually grows into this. In "Sejanus", Tiberius mostly reties retires to his villa in Capri and leaves the day-to-day running of the Empire in the hands of his right-hand man, who uses his authority to eliminate all of Tiberius' heirs except for his grandson Gemellus, so that he can marry the latter's mother Livilla and rule as regent with her when Gemellus succeeds Tiberius. He also has his political opponents arrested and executed on (mostly forged) treason charges. When Tiberius finds out what Sejanus is doing, he turns the tables on him and has ''him'' arrested and executed for treason.

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* TorchesAndPitchforks: In "Germanicus", the PowderKegCrowd is transformed into this when Germanicus decides to have the rebellious legions round up and execute their own leaders for treason rather than doing so himself. They prove rather more overzealous than Germanicus expects; as he surveys the aftermath, he is told the troops took the chance to settle a few old scores with bloodshed in addition to killing the rebel leaders.


* DoubleMeaning: At the beginning of "Caligula", Tiberius invites the title character to accompany Macro to visit Agrippina on Pandataria. Caligula declines, and when Tiberius remarks that Agrippina is his mother, he replies that he has never cared much for blood relationships. In a different sense, he doesn't care for the blood relationship he has with his sisters, Julia Drusilla, Julia Livilla, and Agrippinilla, as he has incestuous relations with all three.

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* DoubleMeaning: At the beginning of "Caligula", Tiberius invites the title character to accompany Macro to visit Agrippina on Pandataria. Caligula declines, and when Tiberius remarks that Agrippina is his mother, he replies that he has never cared much for blood relationships. In a different sense, he doesn't care for the blood relationship he has with his sisters, Julia Drusilla, Julia Livilla, and Agrippinilla, as [[BrotherSisterIncest he has incestuous relations with all three.three]].


* RedshirtArmy: In "Tiberius", Germanicus tries to pitch the idea of a fourth campaign in Germany to push the frontiers of the Empire from the Rhine to the Elbe, and asks Tiberius for four legions to achieve this. When Tiberius asks for an estimate of the casualties, Germanicus, scarcely batting an eyelid, guesses between 40% and 50%. This, combined with the fact that, the following winter, they would likely lose any gains made, allows Tiberius to justify sending Germanicus to Syria instead of back to Germany.

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* RedshirtArmy: In "Tiberius", Germanicus tries to pitch the idea of a fourth campaign in Germany to push the frontiers of the Empire from the Rhine to the Elbe, and asks Tiberius for four legions to achieve this. When Tiberius asks for an estimate of the casualties, Germanicus, [[AMillionIsAStatistic scarcely batting an eyelid, guesses between 40% and 50%.50%]]. This, combined with the fact that, the following winter, they would likely lose any gains made, allows Tiberius to justify sending Germanicus to Syria instead of back to Germany.

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* KangarooCourt: Tiberius and Caligula's reigns are both marked with frequent trials for treason on weak to non-existent evidence simply because the "traitor" is a political opponent of someone in a position of power. After becoming Emperor, Caligula initially declares that treason will no longer be a crime in a bid to wipe the slate clean from Tiberius' reign, but after his fever he brings the show trials back with a vengeance.

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* RedshirtArmy: In "Tiberius", Germanicus tries to pitch the idea of a fourth campaign in Germany to push the frontiers of the Empire from the Rhine to the Elbe, and asks Tiberius for four legions to achieve this. When Tiberius asks for an estimate of the casualties, Germanicus, scarcely batting an eyelid, guesses between 40% and 50%. This, combined with the fact that, the following winter, they would likely lose any gains made, allows Tiberius to justify sending Germanicus to Syria instead of back to Germany.


* BasedOnATrueStory: Although, for the most part, the series avoids the more salacious rumours spread by contemporary historians, the primary sources are still such classical accounts as those by Tacitus and Suetonius. Some details remain exaggerated (for example, most modern historians believe that if Caligula committed incest with any of his sisters, it was likely limited to Drusilla).

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* BasedOnATrueStory: Although, for the most part, the series avoids the more salacious rumours spread by contemporary historians, the primary sources are still such classical accounts as those by Tacitus Tacitus, Suetonius, and Suetonius.Cassius Dio. Some details remain exaggerated (for example, most modern historians believe that if Caligula committed incest with any of his sisters, it was likely limited to Drusilla).



* ShownTheirWork: Philip Mackie's scripts were adapted from such classical sources as Tacitus and Suetonius, in some cases quoting (translations of) the dialogue (for example, Suetonius claims that Augustus said "Have I played my part well in the comedy of life? Then applaud!" on his deathbed, and this scene is recreated in "Augustus"). However, in contrast to ''Series/IClaudius'', some of the really juicy bits were omitted, perhaps in deference to the censors of 1968.

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* ShownTheirWork: Philip Mackie's scripts were adapted from such classical sources as Tacitus Tacitus' ''Annals'', Suetonius' ''Lives of the Twelve Caesars'', and Suetonius, Cassius Dio's ''Roman History'', in some cases quoting (translations of) the dialogue (for example, Suetonius claims that Augustus said "Have I played my part well in the comedy of life? Then applaud!" on his deathbed, and this scene is recreated in "Augustus"). However, in contrast to ''Series/IClaudius'', some of the really juicy bits were omitted, perhaps in deference to the censors of 1968.


A British mini-series shot entirely on studio sets, with a cast largely comprising well-known stage actors, focusing on the political intrigue surrounding the reigns of the Julio-Claudian Roman Emperors... [[Series/IClaudius sound familiar?]]

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A British mini-series shot entirely on studio sets, with a cast largely comprising well-known stage character actors, focusing on the political intrigue surrounding the reigns of the Julio-Claudian Roman Emperors... [[Series/IClaudius sound familiar?]]

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