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* Series-wide:
** The Blue Shells, Lightning Bolts and POW Blocks. All of them all but undodgeable and all of them far too commonly occurring given their power. This shifting baseline has caused what used to be items that occurred twice in a 4-race Grand Prix to appearing in concurrent pickups.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioKart'':
** The first iteration of the coin system is oft-reviled. The more you get (up to 10 for best effect), the faster you go. Falling off the track, bumping into another racer, or being attacked makes you drop coins and you go slower. Have no coins? Just bumping anyone makes you spin out. Because of this, coins are also offered as an item, which is good to have if you are not good enough to pick up coins on the track, but this is more of an annoyance if you got enough coins or are looking for an item to defend yourself with. If that wasn't bad enough, in ''VideoGame/MarioKartSuperCircuit'', you had to collect a lot of coins in order to qualify for star grades at the end of a cup and unlock the SNES tracks.

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* Series-wide:
**
Series-wide: The Blue Shells, Lightning Bolts and POW Blocks. All of them all but undodgeable and all of them far too commonly occurring given their power. This shifting baseline has caused what used to be items that occurred twice in a 4-race Grand Prix to appearing in concurrent pickups.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioKart'':
**
''VideoGame/SuperMarioKart'': The first iteration of the coin system is oft-reviled. The more you get (up to 10 for best effect), the faster you go. Falling off the track, bumping into another racer, or being attacked makes you drop coins and you go slower. Have no coins? Just bumping anyone makes you spin out. Because of this, coins are also offered as an item, which is good to have if you are not good enough to pick up coins on the track, but this is more of an annoyance if you got enough coins or are looking for an item to defend yourself with. If that wasn't bad enough, in ''VideoGame/MarioKartSuperCircuit'', you had to collect a lot of coins in order to qualify for star grades at the end of a cup and unlock the SNES tracks.



* ''VideoGame/MarioKart8''
** In ''[=MK8=]'', you can now no longer claim a new item from an item box while dragging another item behind you. While one can see what they were aiming for, this means that the first-place racer approaching an item box has to make the excruciating decision to drop the banana peel he's using to block red shells in the hopes of getting a Super Horn... or hold on to it in case s/he would get some useless coins instead. The introduction of the second item box in ''[=MK8=] Deluxe'' mitigates this quite a bit.

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* ''VideoGame/MarioKart8''
**
In ''[=MK8=]'', ''VideoGame/MarioKart8'', you can now no longer claim a new item from an item box while dragging another item behind you. While one can see what they were aiming for, this means that the first-place racer approaching an item box has to make the excruciating decision to drop the banana peel he's using to block red shells in the hopes of getting a Super Horn... or hold on to it in case s/he would get some useless coins instead. The introduction of the second item box in ''[=MK8=] Deluxe'' mitigates this quite a bit.


** This game introduced the [[HotPotato Thunder Cloud]] which caused a lot of misery for players. When you get it, it automatically activates, placing a cloud above your racer and slightly boosting your speed. Also, after a short while, it will shrink you unless you transfer it to another racer by ramming into them. The contempt for this item is so great that a lot of fans are glad that it hasn't been in any other Mario Kart since then.

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** This game introduced the [[HotPotato Thunder Cloud]] which caused a lot of misery for players. When you get it, it automatically activates, placing a cloud above your racer and slightly boosting your speed. Also, speed while letting you ignore the regular speed penalty for going off-road. The downside is that after a short while, it will shrink period of time has elapsed, the cloud zaps you unless you transfer with lightning, shrinking you; the only defense is to pass it to another racer by ramming bumping into them.them, but they can send it right back the same way. The contempt for this item is so great that a lot of fans are glad that it hasn't been in any other Mario Kart since then.



** The microphone. The player must blow on it to breathe fire during the Giant Bowser parts. If your microphone isn't up to snuff, it can cost you, especially during a boss battle.

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** The microphone. The player must blow on it to breathe fire during the Giant Bowser parts. If your microphone isn't up to snuff, it can cost you, especially during a boss battle. For the most part, you can get away with ignoring Giant Bowser's fire breath, but the Fawful Express is too short to hit with punches, which makes for ThatOneBoss when combined with the strict turn limit.



** There are many kinds of random events and haphazards that occur during battle due to the theme of the fights taking place on a stage. Shy Guys can run backstage to cause stage equipment to fall down on you or the enemy, Boos can make you or the enemy invisible to make attacks miss, and the freezing mist stage effect can freeze your party or the enemy frozen solid. While the effects are "fair" since they can affect either side, you have no control over what happens, when it happens, and the wrong effect at the wrong time can be disastrous.

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** There are many kinds of random events and haphazards hazards that occur during battle due to the theme of the fights taking place on a stage. Shy Guys can run backstage to cause stage equipment to fall down on you or the enemy, Boos can make you or the enemy invisible to make attacks miss, and the freezing mist stage effect can freeze your party or the enemy frozen solid. While the effects are "fair" since they can affect either side, you have no control over what happens, when it happens, and the wrong effect at the wrong time can be disastrous.



** ''All'' moves you can perform on the battlefield are done with stickers. Stickers come in a ''finite'' quantity (over the course of the game, you can eventually reach 120 max capacity), and most of the more powerful ones [[InventoryManagementPuzzle take up more space in the Sticker Album]]. If you run out of stickers during battle, however unlikely it may seem, [[{{Unwinnable}} you might as well reload your last saved game]].
** There is ''no'' level or stat system at all; you can increase your HP with special items, but the game has no experience points of any kind; all enemy battles give you no rewards other than coins, making frequent combat rather pointless.

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** ''All'' moves you can perform on the battlefield are done with stickers. Stickers come in have a ''finite'' quantity carrying capacity (over the course of the game, you can eventually reach 120 max capacity), and most of the more powerful ones [[InventoryManagementPuzzle take up more space in the Sticker Album]]. If you run out of stickers during battle, however unlikely it may seem, [[{{Unwinnable}} you might as well reload your last saved game]].
** There is ''no'' level or stat system at all; you can increase your HP with special items, but the game has no experience points of any kind; all kind. All enemy battles give you no rewards other than coins, making frequent combat rather pointless.pointless. The coins themselves aren't even that helpful, since they're mostly just for buying more stickers, but you can find a ton of stickers just by exploring levels, so you really only need to replenish your stickers if you just spent a bunch fighting enemies.



** You are now forced to use Things on the main bosses at points in their fights. If you [[SelfImposedChallenge try fighting them normally anyways]], they'll auto-dodge all attacks that aren't their weakness, even if the attack would hit them. In addition, Replicas of Things will not solve the boss puzzles. This means you only get one shot per fight.

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** You are now forced to use Things on the main bosses at points in their fights. If you [[SelfImposedChallenge try fighting them normally anyways]], they'll auto-dodge all attacks that aren't their weakness, even if the attack would hit them. In addition, Replicas of Things will not solve the boss puzzles. This means you only get one shot per fight. The only silver lining is that the game is much better than its predecessor about telegraphing what you'll need well in advance.


** Speaking of random, the Glitz Pit's ruling of applying some random manner of handicap on you at the beginning of a match turns many of the already difficult higher level bouts into unfair and sometimes unwinnable battles. It's unbelievably frustrating to lose a match you normally could have won just because the RandomNumberGod decided you were not allowed to attack for the first three turns or restricted you from using your jump against an aerial foe. Since it's random, it's even possible to be told you can't use your partner or [=FP=] Points against The Armored Harriers: a battle where the ''only'' way to damage them is with Yoshi's [=FP Point-costing=] Gulp ability.

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** Speaking of random, the Glitz Pit's ruling of applying some random manner of handicap on you at the beginning of a match turns many of the already difficult higher level bouts into unfair and sometimes unwinnable battles. battles if you want to increase your rank. It's unbelievably frustrating to lose a match you normally could have won to boost your rank just because the RandomNumberGod decided you were not allowed to attack for the first three turns or restricted you from using your jump against an aerial foe. Since it's random, it's even possible to be told you can't use your partner or [=FP=] Points against The Armored Harriers: a battle where the ''only'' way to damage them is with Yoshi's [=FP Point-costing=] Gulp ability.ability (which will ensure a rematch against them and the possibility to ''get one of those two handicaps again'').


** The Bullet Bill is a big one: It turns you into a super fast giant torpedo that you don't even have to steer. Plus, anyone you hit bounces twice in a random direction, guaranteeing that they are catapulted off the stage on smaller levels. You'll only get it when you're nearly dead last, so it's not an issue for guys in first and second place. However, tell that to the player in 5th place who just got passed because the game decided to reward the 12th place player for being worse at the game.

to:

** The Bullet Bill is a big one: It turns you into a super fast giant torpedo that you don't even have to steer. Plus, anyone you hit bounces twice in a random direction, guaranteeing that they are catapulted off the stage on smaller levels. You'll only get it when you're nearly dead last, so it's not an issue for guys in first and second place. However, tell that to the player in 5th place who just got passed because the game decided to reward the 12th 8th place player for being worse at the game.



* The first ''Mario Party'' featured several mini-games where a player had to rotate the control stick. Hard enough for many, they ended up causing [[https://crappygames.miraheze.org/wiki/Mario_Party_1_Injuries blisters and other painful side effects]], and often damaged the controllers by players trying to rotate the stick too quickly and having it break. Nintendo received a ton of complaints, and ended up releasing special gloves for players who hurt their hands. They also promised that "rotate the control stick" mini-games would never appear in a ''Mario Party'' title again.

to:

* The first ''Mario Party'' featured several mini-games where a player had to rotate the control stick. Hard enough for many, they ended up causing [[https://crappygames.miraheze.org/wiki/Mario_Party_1_Injuries blisters and other painful side effects]], and often damaged the controllers by players trying to rotate the stick too quickly and having it break. Nintendo received a ton of complaints, and ended up releasing special gloves for players who hurt their hands. They also promised that "rotate the control stick" mini-games would never appear in a ''Mario Party'' title again.again, a promise that was broken in ''Mario Party: Island Tour''.


** There's still no text search, though the codes have been shortened. ** Several course maker features taken for granted in the first game are removed here, such as now requiring you to manually remove ground to make room for parts that used to automatically do so when placed and no longer being able to overlap pipes with one-ways or other pipes. Finally, while a level may not be in itself banned, it will still be deleted (automatically) if it features any "corrupt data" like certain glitches, notably the famous black hole glitch, and this will happen ''even if you don't upload it''.

to:

** There's still no text search, though the codes have been shortened. shortened.
** Several course maker features taken for granted in the first game are removed here, such as now requiring you to manually remove ground to make room for parts that used to automatically do so when placed and no longer being able to overlap pipes with one-ways or other pipes. Finally, while a level may not be in itself banned, it will still be deleted (automatically) if it features any "corrupt data" like certain glitches, notably the famous black hole glitch, and this will happen ''even if you don't upload it''.

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioMaker2'' fixes some of these problems, does nothing for others, and even adds whole new issues. Respectively:
** Levels will no longer be deleted no matter how badly they're rated, just not placed in popular lists or Endless mode, and the upload limit started at a flat 32 for everyone, was increased to 64, and has another increase somewhere in the future.
** There's still no text search, though the codes have been shortened. ** Several course maker features taken for granted in the first game are removed here, such as now requiring you to manually remove ground to make room for parts that used to automatically do so when placed and no longer being able to overlap pipes with one-ways or other pipes. Finally, while a level may not be in itself banned, it will still be deleted (automatically) if it features any "corrupt data" like certain glitches, notably the famous black hole glitch, and this will happen ''even if you don't upload it''.


** [[PowerupLetdown The Spring Mushroom power-up.]] You can't stand still while you're wearing it, the movement is very wobbly, and it requires precise timing in order to do a high jump (and unsurprisingly, the areas in which you find the spring require many such jumps). It doesn't help that it doesn't appear until very late in the game, which means you have to use it on some of the harder levels without having a chance to practice using it in easier levels first.

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** [[PowerupLetdown The Spring Mushroom power-up.]] You can't stand still while you're wearing it, the movement is very wobbly, and it requires precise timing in order to do a high jump (and unsurprisingly, the areas in which you find the spring require many such jumps). It doesn't help that it doesn't appear until very late in the game, which means you have to use it on some of the harder levels without having a chance to practice using it in easier levels first. It even appears to be this in-universe, as [[http://www.mariowiki.com/File:Spring_Mario_Art_-_Super_Mario_Galaxy.png the promotional picture]] of this power-up shows Mario looking horrified as if to say [[WesternAnimation/TheJetsons "STOP THIS CRAZY THING!!!"]]


* The first ''Mario Party'' featured several mini-games where a player had to rotate the control stick. Hard enough for many, they ended up causing blisters and other painful side effects, and often damaged the controllers by players trying to rotate the stick too quickly and having it break. Nintendo received a ton of complaints, and ended up releasing special gloves for players who hurt their hands. They also promised that "rotate the control stick" mini-games would never appear in a ''Mario Party'' title again.

to:

* The first ''Mario Party'' featured several mini-games where a player had to rotate the control stick. Hard enough for many, they ended up causing [[https://crappygames.miraheze.org/wiki/Mario_Party_1_Injuries blisters and other painful side effects, effects]], and often damaged the controllers by players trying to rotate the stick too quickly and having it break. Nintendo received a ton of complaints, and ended up releasing special gloves for players who hurt their hands. They also promised that "rotate the control stick" mini-games would never appear in a ''Mario Party'' title again.


** The Ally Rank system, which forces you to rank up ''all'' your party members before you can rank a second one up twice. Characters like Goombella and Flurrie are [[TierInducedScrappy Tier-Induced Scrappies]] who even ''with'' upgrades are outclassed by Koops and Vivian, yet you're still forced to waste your precious Shine Sprites to upgrade a character you'll never use rather than beef up a character you rely on.


** [[PowerupLetdown The Spring Mushroom power-up.]] You can't stand still while you're wearing it, the movement is very wobbly, and it requires precise timing in order to do a high jump (and unsurprisingly, the areas in which you find the spring require many such jumps). It doesn't help that it doesn't appear until very late in the game, which means you have to use it on some of the harder levels without having a chance to practice using it in easier levels first. Provides the page image.

to:

** [[PowerupLetdown The Spring Mushroom power-up.]] You can't stand still while you're wearing it, the movement is very wobbly, and it requires precise timing in order to do a high jump (and unsurprisingly, the areas in which you find the spring require many such jumps). It doesn't help that it doesn't appear until very late in the game, which means you have to use it on some of the harder levels without having a chance to practice using it in easier levels first. Provides the page image.



* '' Mario Party 3'' had Game Guy, who would force you to bet all of your coins in a luck based minigame that would double them if you win or take them all away if you lose. There was also the rare Lucky Charm item that would force another player to play a Game Guy minigame.

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* '' Mario ''Mario Party 3'' had 3''[='=]s Game Guy, who would force you to bet all Guy minigames were a major source of your coins in a luck based minigame that would double them if you win or take them all away if you lose. There was also frustration for many players. Landing on one of his spaces forced the rare Lucky Charm item that would force another player to play gamble all of their coins on a (usually)[[note]]Technically, there's a little bit of strategy involved with Game Guy's Lucky 7 and to a lesser extent Magic Boxes, since the player can choose to push their luck to increase their winnings if they've already won, at the risk of losing it all (unless, in the case of Lucky 7, the player rolled a 1 on the first die, so there's literally no risk of overshooting it and they basically have a free chance to multiply their coins tenfold instead of the usual double)[[/note]] [[LuckBasedMission entirely luck-based minigame]], most of which had 50/50 odds at best and incredibly thin odds at worst ([[ThatOneLevel we're looking at you, Game Guy's Roulette]]), in the hopes of walking away with several times more coins than they started with. Unlucky players could lose every coin they had in a heartbeat (costing many of them the entire game), while lucky players who won a game after gambling lots of coins had a very good chance of winning the Coin Star-- and in some cases (winning on low-odd Roulette spaces or longshot odds on the smaller Chain Chomp in Game Guy's Sweet Surprise, and landing on the final space in Game Guy's Lucky 7) possibly reaching the coin {{cap}}. Notably, unlike the aforementioned Chance Time, Game Guy spaces were frequently placed on the boards' main paths (whereas most Chance Time spaces were placed on Skeleton Key paths, meaning that players typically had to go out of their way to land on one), and even appeared in Duel Mode (where losing all of one's coins was effectively a death sentence as it all but ensured that they wouldn't be able to pay their partners' salary at the start of their next turn, leaving them completely defenseless until they found their way back to their Start Space). Even worse? One of the game's rarest items in the Battle Royale Mode let the user force a Game Guy minigame.minigame on a player of their choice. Unsurprisingly, this mechanic did not return in future games.


[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/spring_mario.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Wow, even Mario doesn't want to [[JustForPun spring]] into action with this power-up. That's a pretty bad sign.]]

[[AC:Party Games]]
* ''VideoGame/MarioParty'':
** Chance Time, for its [[http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2007/01/29/ tendency to screw over more skilled players with forced redistribution of coins and stars]]. On that same note, among more skilled players, and especially StopHavingFunGuys, luck in general is this trope (one of the few things where it's possible for them to agree with {{Scrub}}s on something). Chance time was removed after ''Mario Party 6'' to cut back on the excessive luck, though ''Mario Party 7'' incorporated some elements of it into the Duel mini-games (rather than choosing what to duel for, the stakes are decided by a roulette after the minigame is finished; it's even possible for the loser to luck out and not have to give anything.)
** On the opposite end of the spectrum, Bonus Stars. For a while, players who earned the most coins in mini-games would get one bonus star. Another star was given if a player also collected the most coins at one time during play. Those two bonus stars were usually won by one person since a skilled player who can win a lot of mini-games would also wind up getting another bonus star for having the most coins as well, making them win 2 extra stars and most likely win the game because of it. The series added other types of bonus stars in the mix in order to encourage more diverse playstyles and reduce the amount of players sweeping the bonus stars effortlessly. ''Mario Party 2'' onwards also gives you an option to turn these off, at least.
** Any game with secret star chests. Basically, there is a random chance that at some point (sometimes more) in the game, one player will randomly be given a star. Similar to Chance Time above (but not nearly as extreme) it's frustrating to players to suddenly go from winning to losing because somebody else got something off of pure luck, particularly on maps where getting a single star is a lot of work. Like with the Bonus Stars above, they can be turned off.
** The first ''Mario Party'' featured several mini-games where a player had to rotate the control stick. Hard enough for many, they ended up causing blisters and other painful side effects, and often damaged the controllers by players trying to rotate the stick too quickly and having it break. Nintendo received a ton of complaints, and ended up releasing special gloves for players who hurt their hands. They also promised that "rotate the control stick" mini-games would never appear in a ''Mario Party'' title again.
** The original ''Mario Party'' had 2 boards where Toad and Bowser would at times switch places. A player could be near Toad only to have someone step on a Happening Space, and end up meeting Bowser instead, losing quite a number of coins.
** Wario's Battle Canyon and Peach's Birthday Cake from the first game were also more luck based than usual as the former causes players to be blasted out of cannons and land on another island, the problem is that it's difficult landing in just the right spot causing players to potentially land after Toad while the latter forces the players to pay coins to play a lottery when they reach the board's only split path to determine whether they meet Toad or Bowser. There are more details about Peach's Birthday Cake on [[ThatOneLevel/MarioParty this page]].
** '' Mario Party 3'' had Game Guy, who would force you to bet all of your coins in a luck based minigame that would double them if you win or take them all away if you lose. There was also the rare Lucky Charm item that would force another player to play a Game Guy minigame.
** ''Mario Party 4''[='=]s Mini and Mega Mushrooms. The mechanic (replacing the skeleton keys from the previous games by having size changing mushrooms that open new paths -- the Mega Mushroom allows you to skip board events, making it a borderline GameBreaker, while the Mini-Mushroom... allows you to go down smaller pipes while having a limited number on your dice) wouldn't be quite as bad if there weren't a number of mushroom spaces giving you the items, meaning that if you want to even have anything else in your pockets, you must use them to get rid of them, leaving you in either form most of the time.
** The main issues with ''Mario Party 5'' are the lack of shops forcing players to rely completely on the luck of the draw from the capsule machine, and the fact that you can be hurt by traps you set yourself.
** From ''Mario Party 5'' on, battle minigames were no longer a board space and instead randomly replaced a standard end-of-turn minigame. Despite having the potential to change the game dramatically, this isn't the problem. The problem is that the winnings and losses from these minigames counted toward the players' Minigame Star count, basically ensuring that whoever won the most expensive battle minigame would be guaranteed the bonus star at the end, regardless of their performance for the rest of the game.
** Bowser Time! in ''Mario Party 7''. Every 5 turns, Bowser shows up to cause trouble such as taking a picture of the characters and forcing everyone to pay or temporarily destroying one of the orb shops and setting up his own business where he would sell the first person a Golden Bowser Statue (which has absolutely no impact on the game) or a Koopa Kid orb (both of which get stolen immediately and regarding the latter, adds another Koopa Kid space on the board) to making some changes to the board's environment like destroying bridges either forcing players to take a different route or ending their turn as soon as they reach the bridge.
** ''Mario Party 9'' having linear maps and all players traveling together in a vehicle is this to some fans as they felt it was too far a deviation from the original series and being together in a vehicle robs a sense of control for players.
** ''Mario Party 10'' has Amiibo Party, a mode designed as a simplistic throwback to earlier ''Mario Party'' games. The most obvious complaint is that you have to purchase compatible Amiibos just to play the mode. But even when you get past that, there remains one insanely annoying mechanic: if you're playing as an Amiibo (and at least one person must be), you cannot roll the die, pick up items, use them, or stop a spinner without physically touching your Amiibo to the gamepad. Every time. It only gets more crowded when multiple players use Amiibos.
** Bowser Party in ''Mario Party 10'' stacks the entire game unfavorably toward the team running from Bowser. It allows Bowser to reroll his dice if his roll doesn't reach the team as well as gain a bonus when the team reaches the home stretch. Furthermore, the end of the board has tons of Bowser Jr. spaces ready to send the team back or take their hearts. Winning isn't impossible for the team, but it'll certainly take a lot of luck, which makes it an infuriating game to play for some players.
** More generally, the fact that all the minigames in any game are initially locked and there's no way to play them without randomly unlocking them while doing the boards has never sat well with the JustHereForGodzilla crowd who are only interested in the minigames. (Especially since most party games allow the players to jump into the minigames right out of the gate.) This was fixed in ''Mario Party 9'', ''Mario Party: Island Tour,'' and ''Mario Party 10,'' but returned in ''Mario Party: Star Rush,'' with the key difference being that three minigames are available by default.

[[AC:2D Platform Games]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/spring_mario.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Wow, even Mario doesn't want to [[JustForPun spring]] into action with this power-up. That's a pretty bad sign.]]

[[AC:Party Games]]
* ''VideoGame/MarioParty'':
** Chance Time, for its [[http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2007/01/29/ tendency to screw over more skilled players with forced redistribution of coins and stars]]. On that same note, among more skilled players, and especially StopHavingFunGuys, luck in general is this trope (one of the few things where it's possible for them to agree with {{Scrub}}s on something). Chance time was removed after ''Mario Party 6'' to cut back on the excessive luck, though ''Mario Party 7'' incorporated some elements of it into the Duel mini-games (rather than choosing what to duel for, the stakes are decided by a roulette after the minigame is finished; it's even possible for the loser to luck out and not have to give anything.)
** On the opposite end of the spectrum, Bonus Stars. For a while, players who earned the most coins in mini-games would get one bonus star. Another star was given if a player also collected the most coins at one time during play. Those two bonus stars were usually won by one person since a skilled player who can win a lot of mini-games would also wind up getting another bonus star for having the most coins as well, making them win 2 extra stars and most likely win the game because of it. The series added other types of bonus stars in the mix in order to encourage more diverse playstyles and reduce the amount of players sweeping the bonus stars effortlessly. ''Mario Party 2'' onwards also gives you an option to turn these off, at least.
** Any game with secret star chests. Basically, there is a random chance that at some point (sometimes more) in the game, one player will randomly be given a star. Similar to Chance Time above (but not nearly as extreme) it's frustrating to players to suddenly go from winning to losing because somebody else got something off of pure luck, particularly on maps where getting a single star is a lot of work. Like with the Bonus Stars above, they can be turned off.
** The first ''Mario Party'' featured several mini-games where a player had to rotate the control stick. Hard enough for many, they ended up causing blisters and other painful side effects, and often damaged the controllers by players trying to rotate the stick too quickly and having it break. Nintendo received a ton of complaints, and ended up releasing special gloves for players who hurt their hands. They also promised that "rotate the control stick" mini-games would never appear in a ''Mario Party'' title again.
** The original ''Mario Party'' had 2 boards where Toad and Bowser would at times switch places. A player could be near Toad only to have someone step on a Happening Space, and end up meeting Bowser instead, losing quite a number of coins.
** Wario's Battle Canyon and Peach's Birthday Cake from the first game were also more luck based than usual as the former causes players to be blasted out of cannons and land on another island, the problem is that it's difficult landing in just the right spot causing players to potentially land after Toad while the latter forces the players to pay coins to play a lottery when they reach the board's only split path to determine whether they meet Toad or Bowser. There are more details about Peach's Birthday Cake on [[ThatOneLevel/MarioParty this page]].
** '' Mario Party 3'' had Game Guy, who would force you to bet all of your coins in a luck based minigame that would double them if you win or take them all away if you lose. There was also the rare Lucky Charm item that would force another player to play a Game Guy minigame.
** ''Mario Party 4''[='=]s Mini and Mega Mushrooms. The mechanic (replacing the skeleton keys from the previous games by having size changing mushrooms that open new paths -- the Mega Mushroom allows you to skip board events, making it a borderline GameBreaker, while the Mini-Mushroom... allows you to go down smaller pipes while having a limited number on your dice) wouldn't be quite as bad if there weren't a number of mushroom spaces giving you the items, meaning that if you want to even have anything else in your pockets, you must use them to get rid of them, leaving you in either form most of the time.
** The main issues with ''Mario Party 5'' are the lack of shops forcing players to rely completely on the luck of the draw from the capsule machine, and the fact that you can be hurt by traps you set yourself.
** From ''Mario Party 5'' on, battle minigames were no longer a board space and instead randomly replaced a standard end-of-turn minigame. Despite having the potential to change the game dramatically, this isn't the problem. The problem is that the winnings and losses from these minigames counted toward the players' Minigame Star count, basically ensuring that whoever won the most expensive battle minigame would be guaranteed the bonus star at the end, regardless of their performance for the rest of the game.
** Bowser Time! in ''Mario Party 7''. Every 5 turns, Bowser shows up to cause trouble such as taking a picture of the characters and forcing everyone to pay or temporarily destroying one of the orb shops and setting up his own business where he would sell the first person a Golden Bowser Statue (which has absolutely no impact on the game) or a Koopa Kid orb (both of which get stolen immediately and regarding the latter, adds another Koopa Kid space on the board) to making some changes to the board's environment like destroying bridges either forcing players to take a different route or ending their turn as soon as they reach the bridge.
** ''Mario Party 9'' having linear maps and all players traveling together in a vehicle is this to some fans as they felt it was too far a deviation from the original series and being together in a vehicle robs a sense of control for players.
** ''Mario Party 10'' has Amiibo Party, a mode designed as a simplistic throwback to earlier ''Mario Party'' games. The most obvious complaint is that you have to purchase compatible Amiibos just to play the mode. But even when you get past that, there remains one insanely annoying mechanic: if you're playing as an Amiibo (and at least one person must be), you cannot roll the die, pick up items, use them, or stop a spinner without physically touching your Amiibo to the gamepad. Every time. It only gets more crowded when multiple players use Amiibos.
** Bowser Party in ''Mario Party 10'' stacks the entire game unfavorably toward the team running from Bowser. It allows Bowser to reroll his dice if his roll doesn't reach the team as well as gain a bonus when the team reaches the home stretch. Furthermore, the end of the board has tons of Bowser Jr. spaces ready to send the team back or take their hearts. Winning isn't impossible for the team, but it'll certainly take a lot of luck, which makes it an infuriating game to play for some players.
** More generally, the fact that all the minigames in any game are initially locked and there's no way to play them without randomly unlocking them while doing the boards has never sat well with the JustHereForGodzilla crowd who are only interested in the minigames. (Especially since most party games allow the players to jump into the minigames right out of the gate.) This was fixed in ''Mario Party 9'', ''Mario Party: Island Tour,'' and ''Mario Party 10,'' but returned in ''Mario Party: Star Rush,'' with the key difference being that three minigames are available by default.

[[AC:2D
[[foldercontrol]]
[[folder:2-D
Platform Games]]



** To unlock Worlds A through D in the original Famicom Disk System version of ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'', you must beat the entire game ''eight times''. You can lessen the time by using [[WarpZone Warp Zones]], though. Even if you do enjoy the SequelDifficultySpike, this is still FakeLongevity at its finest. Fortunately, the ''VideoGame/SuperMarioAllStars'' version loosens the unlock condition to "just beat the game once".
** Using a warp zone before reaching World 9 locks you out of getting to World 9, even if the pipe you entered leads to an earlier world. In the ''All-Star'' version, this includes any future attempts after you've already beaten the game. So if you save after using a warp zone without realizing this fact, [[PermanentlyMissableContent your save file can never get to World 9 ever again]].

to:

** To unlock Worlds A through D in the original Famicom Disk System version of ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'', version, you must beat the entire game ''eight times''. You can lessen the time by using [[WarpZone Warp Zones]], though. Even if you do enjoy the SequelDifficultySpike, this is still FakeLongevity at its finest. Fortunately, the ''VideoGame/SuperMarioAllStars'' version loosens the unlock condition to "just beat the game once".
** Using a warp zone before reaching World 9 locks you out of getting to World 9, even if the pipe you entered leads to an earlier world. In the ''All-Star'' ''All-Stars'' version, this includes any future attempts after you've already beaten the game. So if you save after using a warp zone without realizing this fact, [[PermanentlyMissableContent your save file can never get to World 9 ever again]].



* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'' has one major problem in the original NES release: ''[[SaveGameLimits there is no saving at all]],'' and the game spans eight entire lands with lots of things to do between "begin World 1-1" and "beat Bowser", as there are now ''90'' levels instead of 32, 52 or 20 like in the previous games respectively. Sure, you can use {{Warp Whistle}}s to "resume" your game, but you have to start from the very beginning of the world with no forts destroyed or keyhole doors removed, as well as an empty item inventory. This is why every subsequent release has included some form of saving, whether it's save files in the ''VideoGame/SuperMarioAllStars'' CompilationRerelease or suspend saves in the UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole releases.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'' has one major problem in the original NES release: ''[[SaveGameLimits there is no saving at all]],'' and the game spans eight entire lands with lots of things to do between "begin World 1-1" and "beat Bowser", as there are now ''90'' levels instead of 32, 52 or 20 like in the previous games respectively. Sure, you can use {{Warp Whistle}}s to "resume" your game, but you have to start from the very beginning of the world with no forts destroyed or keyhole doors removed, as well as an empty item inventory. This is why every subsequent release has included some form of saving, whether it's save files in the ''VideoGame/SuperMarioAllStars'' CompilationRerelease ''All-Stars'' and ''Advance'' or suspend saves in the UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole releases.



** Mario/Luigi on the overworld map moves at a tortoise's pace. It's not really noticeable if you're merely moving from one level to the next, but if you want the Top Secret Area and you're somewhere like Chocolate Island or Valley of Bowser where lives are easily lost, and you're not using the Star World, then you have to waste a fair number of minutes plodding all the way to the Top Secret Area, and then you have to plod all the way back; it's a vexingly slow and tedious process. In the GBA release, you can warp straight to whichever level you want... once you've reached all 96 goals, that is.

to:

** Mario/Luigi on the overworld map moves at a tortoise's pace. It's not really noticeable if you're merely moving from one level to the next, but if you want the Top Secret Area and you're somewhere like Chocolate Island or Valley of Bowser where lives are easily lost, and you're not using the Star World, then you have to waste a fair number of minutes plodding all the way to the Top Secret Area, and then you have to plod all the way back; it's a vexingly slow and tedious process. In the GBA release, you can warp straight to whichever level you want... once you've reached all 96 goals, exits, that is.



** One of the most common criticisms of the ''Wii'' installment was [[{{Waggle}} having to shake the Wii Remote]] to spin jump, get off Yoshi, and pick up objects, despite them leaving out the B button on the Wii remote. This could cause lags in actions that lead to untimely deaths.

to:

** One of the most common criticisms of the ''Wii'' installment ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosWii'' was [[{{Waggle}} having to shake the Wii Remote]] to spin jump, get off Yoshi, and pick up objects, despite them leaving out the B button on the Wii remote. This could cause lags lag in actions that lead to untimely deaths.



** The platforms in ''U'' that shut down once too many objects are on them. Taken UpToEleven in "Red-Hot Elevator Ride", where the platform will only keep moving if Mario is the ''only'' thing on it. So, naturally, the level provides plenty of enemies and even ''coins'' to stop the platform and prevent you from moving up, all while [[RiseToTheChallenge lava fills up the tower]].

to:

** The platforms in ''U'' ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU'' that shut down once too many objects are on them. Taken UpToEleven in "Red-Hot Elevator Ride", where the platform will only keep moving if Mario is the ''only'' thing on it. So, naturally, the level provides plenty of enemies and even ''coins'' to stop the platform and prevent you from moving up, all while [[RiseToTheChallenge lava fills up the tower]].



** Commenting a level automatically stars it. To avoid giving a star when providing constructive criticism, you have to view comments from Course World or the website. A patch rectified the problem by allowing people to leave a comment on the level directly without giving it a star.

to:

** Commenting a level automatically stars it. To avoid giving a star when providing constructive criticism, you have to view comments from Course World or the website. A patch rectified the this problem by allowing people to leave a comment on the level directly without giving it a star.



** Levels are represented by 16-digit codes, but there is no QR-code support in the game even though the [=WiiU=] can handle QR-codes.

to:

** Levels are represented by 16-digit codes, but there is no QR-code QR code support in the game even though the [=WiiU=] Wii U can handle QR-codes.QR codes.




[[AC:3D Platform Games]]

to:

\n[[AC:3D [[/folder]]

[[folder:3-D
Platform Games]]



* ''VideoGame/LuigisMansion'':
** The poisonous mushrooms shrink Luigi, disable his vacuum, and make him lose some coins. They don't make the game harder, just more annoying, especially when catching Portrait Ghosts and Speedy Spirit.
** In the basement, one room has dirt piles which take a while to clean up and they return every time you come back into the room.
** The further in the game you get, the Boos become more annoying to capture since their health is now in the triple digits and they can potentially escape into a room you can't enter yet. And at any time in the game, it's possible for a Boo to escape through a wall into a place where Luigi must go through an incredibly convoluted path to enter and chase after it, including escaping from Area 3 to Area 1, which can only be gotten to by going back to the foyer on the first floor, and worst of all, escaping into the Sealed Room, which can only be entered by ''climbing onto the roof and jumping down the chimney.''
** ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'' has an UnexpectedGameplayChange to platforming in your survival horror-lite, with motion controls [[GuideDangIt of which the game does not see fit to inform you,]] and that involve holding the [=3DS=] perfectly still for extended periods of time while Luigi inches excruciatingly slowly forward on a tightrope over a bottomless pit [[SerialEscalation in an ice level, while being buffeted by winds, In a game where you only get up to one extra life per level.]]



%% ** The motion controls are this for some players.

[[AC:Racing Games]]
* ''VideoGame/MarioKart'':
** The Blue Shells, Lightning Bolts and [=POWs=].
*** All of them all but undodgeable and all of them far too commonly occurring given their power (particularly in the Wii offering, due to the greater number of racers). This shifting baseline has caused what used to be items that occurred twice in a 4 race circuit to appearing in concurrent pickups. They can be mostly cut out in Mario Kart Wii by choosing the "strategic" item set, but only for local multiplayer--hence, to beat the Grand Prix, you will need to just bear up. The Blue Shell can be used to take out other racers, if you're in first place. Slam on the brakes at the right time and the explosion will hit a few other racers. If you're going to drop 5 or 6 places, may as well take someone with you. Another aspect of the Blue Shell that can drive you crazy is that once it closes in on the leading racers (who haven't yet finished the race), it will fixate onto the leading racer of that specific moment. So if you get hit a half second after it locks on you and fall backward a few places, it will hit you anyway, meaning you'll likely fall even further back and give whoever replaced you for the lead a free pass. Finally, if you throw a Blue Shell and then get into first before it locks on (a rare situation, but it happens, especially in one-on-one races), you can be hit by your own Blue Shell. ''Mario Kart 8'' seeks to fix the issue with the introduction of the Super Horn, which causes a shockwave when used that stuns all nearby racers and destroys all projectiles in the same area when used, including the Blue Shell.
*** In ''Mario Kart 7'', the Blue Shell now takes the worst parts of the versions from the earlier games: it flies along the floor until it reaches the first place player, then flies up and blasts them to pieces. Unfortunately, both of these 'attacks' can really easily screw someone up; the players at the back due to them being in the middle of the track on a narrow course (guess where the Blue Shell travels, and you have about four seconds to move out the way or get obliterated) and for the person in the lead, it seems the impact of being hit is random, you fly to the side in some almost arbitrary direction and likely fly off the track. If a Blue Shell gets fired on SNES Rainbow Road, someone racing will pay dearly for it.
** The weird thing is that most people assume that the mechanic that gave the trailing racers better items debuted in ''[=MK64=]''. [[OlderThanTheyThink It didn't]]. It was actually a feature in ''Super Mario Kart'', but only for the players since computers didn't use items at all. All ''64'' did was allow the computer racers to use items rather than their predictable and avoidable attacks. And as for ''Wii'', Red Shells are a valid item drop for even ''first place'', with Mushrooms being given to second place.
** Mario Kart Wii's upping the racer count from 8 to 12 turned out to be quite the scrappy mechanic because it increases how often annoying items are used. There have been horror stories of players getting hit by ''multiple'' blue shells in rapid succession, or taken down by a blue shell, a lightning bolt, a POW block, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and a Blooper]] one after the other, which shouldn't even be ''possible'' because the lightning bolt normally causes everyone else [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard (or at least, humans)]] to drop their items.
** The Bullet Bill is a big one: It turns you into a super fast giant torpedo that you DON'T EVEN HAVE TO STEER. Plus, anyone you hit bounces TWICE, guaranteeing that they are catapulted off the stage on smaller levels. You'll only get it when you're nearly dead last, so it's not an issue for guys in first and second place. However, tell that to the player in 5th place who just got passed because the game decided to reward the 12th place player for being worse at the game.
** And then there's the coin system in the SNES and GBA Mario Kart games. The more you get (up to 10 for best effect), the faster you go. Falling off the track, bumping into people, or being attacked makes you drop coins and you go slower. Have no coins? Just bumping anyone makes you spin out. Because of this, coins are also offered as an item, which is good to have if you are not good enough to pick up coins on the track, but this is more of an annoyance if you got enough coins or are looking for an item to defend yourself with. If that wasn't bad enough, for the GBA version, you had to collect a lot of coins in order to qualify for star grades at the end of a cup (along with your race times).
** ''Mario Kart 7'''s version of the coin system is more forgiving; the only benefit to having them is a boost in top speed, and not having any will simply keep your kart performing normally. Additionally, you can only lose coins by falling off the track or being attacked by an item, and simply bumping into another kart will let you keep your coins. However, it turned the Lightning Bolt into one of the most hated items in the entire game, as it instantaneously makes every single other racer lose about 4 coins in addition to stopping, shrinking, and slowing them down.
** ''Mario Kart 7'', being like any other game in the series, can get crazy with items. There can be several races where you can go from 10 coins down to 2 due to being hit by several items in a row. Combine this with unlockables requiring coins to be unlocked is a nightmare waiting to happen.
** ''Mario Kart Wii'' introduced the [[HotPotato Thunder Cloud]] which caused a lot of misery for players since it can be picked up in ''any position'', even in last place. When you get it, it automatically activates, placing a cloud above your racer and slightly boosting your speed. Also, after a short while, it will shrink you unless you transfer it to another racer by ramming into them. The contempt for this item is so great that a lot of fans are glad that it hasn't been in any other Mario Kart since then.
** ''Mario Kart 8'' does tone down the Blue Shells and Lightning, and introduces the Super Horn, which can destroy Blue Shells. Unfortunately, items are now awarded based on distance from the leader, not position in the race, meaning even second- and third-place racers can get really awesome items. First place? Expect a lot of coins to come up in that roulette.
** Also in ''[=MK8=]'', you can now no longer claim a new item from an item box while dragging another item behind you. While one can see what they were aiming for, this means that the first-place racer approaching an item box has to make the excruciating decision to drop the banana peel he's using to block red shells in the hopes of getting a Super Horn... or hold on to it in case s/he would get some useless coins instead. What makes the coin system even worse is that coins will still show up even if you can't carry any more, meaning that you might be sacrificing an item for no benefit whatsoever. Even when ''[=MK8=] Deluxe'' brought back the second item box you still have no use for holding onto coins (outside of unlocking more kart parts).
** In ''Mario Kart DS'', power-sliding. It's a difficult technique to pull off, but it rewards with a short speed boost when successful. Human players can do it alright, but it takes a couple seconds. The [=CPUs=] don't have this limitation ([[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard they can activate it very fast]]) and use, overuse, and abuse it on the 150cc setting, making it extremely difficult to reach the first place. Everyone will be faster than you. Everyone.

[[AC:Role-Playing Games]]

to:

%% ** The motion controls are this for some players.

[[AC:Racing Games]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Mario Kart]]
* ''VideoGame/MarioKart'':
Series-wide:
** The Blue Shells, Lightning Bolts and [=POWs=].
***
POW Blocks. All of them all but undodgeable and all of them far too commonly occurring given their power (particularly in the Wii offering, due to the greater number of racers). power. This shifting baseline has caused what used to be items that occurred twice in a 4 race circuit 4-race Grand Prix to appearing in concurrent pickups. They can be mostly cut out in Mario Kart Wii by choosing the "strategic" item set, but only for local multiplayer--hence, to beat the Grand Prix, you will need to just bear up. The Blue Shell can be used to take out other racers, if you're in first place. Slam on the brakes at the right time and the explosion will hit a few other racers. If you're going to drop 5 or 6 places, may as well take someone with you. Another aspect of the Blue Shell that can drive you crazy is that once it closes in on the leading racers (who haven't yet finished the race), it will fixate onto the leading racer of that specific moment. So if you get hit a half second after it locks on you and fall backward a few places, it will hit you anyway, meaning you'll likely fall even further back and give whoever replaced you for the lead a free pass. Finally, if you throw a Blue Shell and then get into first before it locks on (a rare situation, but it happens, especially in one-on-one races), you can be hit by your own Blue Shell. ''Mario Kart 8'' seeks to fix the issue with the introduction of the Super Horn, which causes a shockwave when used that stuns all nearby racers and destroys all projectiles in the same area when used, including the Blue Shell.
*** In ''Mario Kart 7'', the Blue Shell now takes the worst parts of the versions from the earlier games: it flies along the floor until it reaches the first place player, then flies up and blasts them to pieces. Unfortunately, both of these 'attacks' can really easily screw someone up; the players at the back due to them being in the middle of the track on a narrow course (guess where the Blue Shell travels, and you have about four seconds to move out the way or get obliterated) and for the person in the lead, it seems the impact of being hit is random, you fly to the side in some almost arbitrary direction and likely fly off the track. If a Blue Shell gets fired on SNES Rainbow Road, someone racing will pay dearly for it.
pickups.
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioKart'':
** The weird thing is that most people assume that the mechanic that gave the trailing racers better items debuted in ''[=MK64=]''. [[OlderThanTheyThink It didn't]]. It was actually a feature in ''Super Mario Kart'', but only for the players since computers didn't use items at all. All ''64'' did was allow the computer racers to use items rather than their predictable and avoidable attacks. And as for ''Wii'', Red Shells are a valid item drop for even ''first place'', with Mushrooms being given to second place.
** Mario Kart Wii's upping the racer count from 8 to 12 turned out to be quite the scrappy mechanic because it increases how often annoying items are used. There have been horror stories of players getting hit by ''multiple'' blue shells in rapid succession, or taken down by a blue shell, a lightning bolt, a POW block, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and a Blooper]] one after the other, which shouldn't even be ''possible'' because the lightning bolt normally causes everyone else [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard (or at least, humans)]] to drop their items.
** The Bullet Bill is a big one: It turns you into a super fast giant torpedo that you DON'T EVEN HAVE TO STEER. Plus, anyone you hit bounces TWICE, guaranteeing that they are catapulted off the stage on smaller levels. You'll only get it when you're nearly dead last, so it's not an issue for guys in
first and second place. However, tell that to the player in 5th place who just got passed because the game decided to reward the 12th place player for being worse at the game.
** And then there's
iteration of the coin system in the SNES and GBA Mario Kart games.is oft-reviled. The more you get (up to 10 for best effect), the faster you go. Falling off the track, bumping into people, another racer, or being attacked makes you drop coins and you go slower. Have no coins? Just bumping anyone makes you spin out. Because of this, coins are also offered as an item, which is good to have if you are not good enough to pick up coins on the track, but this is more of an annoyance if you got enough coins or are looking for an item to defend yourself with. If that wasn't bad enough, for the GBA version, in ''VideoGame/MarioKartSuperCircuit'', you had to collect a lot of coins in order to qualify for star grades at the end of a cup (along with your race times).
** ''Mario Kart 7'''s version of
and unlock the coin system is more forgiving; the only benefit to having them SNES tracks.
* ''VideoGame/MarioKartDS'':
** The Bullet Bill
is a boost in top speed, and not having any will simply keep your kart performing normally. Additionally, big one: It turns you can only lose coins by falling into a super fast giant torpedo that you don't even have to steer. Plus, anyone you hit bounces twice in a random direction, guaranteeing that they are catapulted off the track or being attacked by stage on smaller levels. You'll only get it when you're nearly dead last, so it's not an item, issue for guys in first and simply bumping into another kart will let you keep your coins. second place. However, tell that to the player in 5th place who just got passed because the game decided to reward the 12th place player for being worse at the game.
** Power-sliding, or worse, snaking. It's a difficult technique to pull off, but
it rewards the user with a short speed boost when successful. Human players can do it alright, but it takes a couple seconds. The [=CPUs=] don't have this limitation ([[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard they can activate it very fast]]) and use, overuse, and abuse it on the 150cc setting, making it extremely difficult to reach the first place. Everyone will be faster than you. Everyone.
* ''VideoGame/MarioKartWii'':
** The racer count being increased from 8 to 12
turned out to be quite the Lightning Bolt into one of the most hated scrappy mechanic, because it increases how often annoying items in the entire game, as it instantaneously makes every single other racer lose about 4 coins in addition to stopping, shrinking, and slowing them down.
** ''Mario Kart 7'', being like any other game in the series, can get crazy with items.
are used. There can be several races where you can go from 10 coins down to 2 due to being have been horror stories of players getting hit by several items ''multiple'' blue shells in rapid succession, or taken down by a row. Combine this with unlockables requiring coins blue shell, a lightning bolt, a POW block, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and a Blooper]] one after the other, which is all but impossible in normal gameplay because the lightning bolt normally causes everyone else [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard (or at least, humans)]] to be unlocked is a nightmare waiting to happen.
drop their items.
** ''Mario Kart Wii'' This game introduced the [[HotPotato Thunder Cloud]] which caused a lot of misery for players since it can be picked up in ''any position'', even in last place.players. When you get it, it automatically activates, placing a cloud above your racer and slightly boosting your speed. Also, after a short while, it will shrink you unless you transfer it to another racer by ramming into them. The contempt for this item is so great that a lot of fans are glad that it hasn't been in any other Mario Kart since then.
* ''VideoGame/MarioKart7'':
** ''Mario Kart 8'' does tone down the The Blue Shells Shell now takes the worst parts of the versions from the earlier games: it flies along the floor until it reaches the first place player, then flies up and Lightning, and introduces the Super Horn, which can destroy Blue Shells. blasts them to pieces. Unfortunately, items are now awarded based on distance from both of these attack can really easily screw someone up; the leader, not position players at the back due to them being in the race, meaning even second- middle of the track on a narrow course (guess where the Blue Shell travels, and third-place racers you have about four seconds to move out the way or get obliterated) and for the person in the lead, it seems the impact of being hit is random, you fly to the side in some almost arbitrary direction and likely fly off the track. If a Blue Shell gets fired on SNES Rainbow Road, someone racing will pay dearly for it.
** This game's version of the coin system is more forgiving; the only benefit to having them is a boost in top speed, and not having any will simply keep your kart performing normally. Additionally, you
can get really awesome items. First place? Expect a lot of only lose coins by falling off the track or being attacked by an item, and simply bumping into another racer will let you keep your coins. However, it turned the Lightning Bolt into one of the most hated items in the entire game, as it instantaneously makes every single other racer lose about 4 coins in addition to come up in stopping, shrinking, and slowing them down. On top of that, the coin count now maxes at 10, which means that roulette.
stocking up coins for unlockables is a nightmare waiting to happen.
* ''VideoGame/MarioKart8''
** Also in In ''[=MK8=]'', you can now no longer claim a new item from an item box while dragging another item behind you. While one can see what they were aiming for, this means that the first-place racer approaching an item box has to make the excruciating decision to drop the banana peel he's using to block red shells in the hopes of getting a Super Horn... or hold on to it in case s/he would get some useless coins instead. What makes The introduction of the coin system even worse is that coins will still show up even if you can't carry any more, meaning that you might be sacrificing an second item for no benefit whatsoever. Even when box in ''[=MK8=] Deluxe'' brought back the second item box you still have no use mitigates this quite a bit.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Mario Party]]
* Chance Time,
for holding onto its [[http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2007/01/29/ tendency to screw over more skilled players with forced redistribution of coins (outside of unlocking and stars]]. On that same note, among more kart parts).
** In
skilled players, and especially StopHavingFunGuys, luck in general is this trope (one of the few things where it's possible for them to agree with {{Scrub}}s on something). Chance Time was removed after ''Mario Kart DS'', power-sliding. It's Party 6'' to cut back on the excessive luck, though ''Mario Party 7'' incorporated some elements of it into the Duel mini-games (rather than choosing what to duel for, the stakes are decided by a roulette after the minigame is finished; it's even possible for the loser to luck out and not have to give anything.)
* On the opposite end of the spectrum, Bonus Stars. For a while, players who earned the most coins in mini-games would get one bonus star. Another star was given if a player also collected the most coins at one time during play. Those two bonus stars were usually won by one person since a skilled player who can win a lot of mini-games would also wind up getting another bonus star for having the most coins as well, making them win 2 extra stars and most likely win the game because of it. The series added other types of bonus stars in the mix in order to encourage more diverse playstyles and reduce the amount of players sweeping the bonus stars effortlessly. ''Mario Party 2'' onwards also gives you an option to turn these off, at least.
* Any game with secret star chests. Basically, there is a random chance that at some point (sometimes more) in the game, one player will randomly be given a star. Similar to Chance Time above (but not nearly as extreme) it's frustrating to players to suddenly go from winning to losing because somebody else got something off of pure luck, particularly on maps where getting a single star is a lot of work. Like with the Bonus Stars above, they can be turned off.
* The first ''Mario Party'' featured several mini-games where a player had to rotate the control stick. Hard enough for many, they ended up causing blisters and other painful side effects, and often damaged the controllers by players trying to rotate the stick too quickly and having it break. Nintendo received a ton of complaints, and ended up releasing special gloves for players who hurt their hands. They also promised that "rotate the control stick" mini-games would never appear in a ''Mario Party'' title again.
* The original ''Mario Party'' had 2 boards where Toad and Bowser would at times switch places. A player could be near Toad only to have someone step on a Happening Space, and end up meeting Bowser instead, losing quite a number of coins.
* Wario's Battle Canyon and Peach's Birthday Cake from the first game were also more luck based than usual as the former causes players to be blasted out of cannons and land on another island, the problem is that it's
difficult technique to pull off, but it rewards with a short speed boost when successful. Human landing in just the right spot causing players can do it alright, but it takes to potentially land after Toad while the latter forces the players to pay coins to play a couple seconds. The [=CPUs=] don't have lottery when they reach the board's only split path to determine whether they meet Toad or Bowser. There are more details about Peach's Birthday Cake on [[ThatOneLevel/MarioParty this limitation ([[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard they can activate it very fast]]) page]].
* '' Mario Party 3'' had Game Guy, who would force you to bet all of your coins in a luck based minigame that would double them if you win or take them all away if you lose. There was also the rare Lucky Charm item that would force another player to play a Game Guy minigame.
* ''Mario Party 4''[='=]s Mini
and use, overuse, and abuse it on Mega Mushrooms. The mechanic (replacing the 150cc setting, skeleton keys from the previous games by having size changing mushrooms that open new paths -- the Mega Mushroom allows you to skip board events, making it extremely difficult a borderline GameBreaker, while the Mini-Mushroom... allows you to go down smaller pipes while having a limited number on your dice) wouldn't be quite as bad if there weren't a number of mushroom spaces giving you the items, meaning that if you want to even have anything else in your pockets, you must use them to get rid of them, leaving you in either form most of the time.
* The main issues with ''Mario Party 5'' are the lack of shops forcing players to rely completely on the luck of the draw from the capsule machine, and the fact that you can be hurt by traps you set yourself.
* From ''Mario Party 5'' on, battle minigames were no longer a board space and instead randomly replaced a standard end-of-turn minigame. Despite having the potential to change the game dramatically, this isn't the problem. The problem is that the winnings and losses from these minigames counted toward the players' Minigame Star count, basically ensuring that whoever won the most expensive battle minigame would be guaranteed the bonus star at the end, regardless of their performance for the rest of the game.
* Bowser Time! in ''Mario Party 7''. Every 5 turns, Bowser shows up to cause trouble such as taking a picture of the characters and forcing everyone to pay or temporarily destroying one of the orb shops and setting up his own business where he would sell the first person a Golden Bowser Statue (which has absolutely no impact on the game) or a Koopa Kid orb (both of which get stolen immediately and regarding the latter, adds another Koopa Kid space on the board) to making some changes to the board's environment like destroying bridges either forcing players to take a different route or ending their turn as soon as they
reach the first place. Everyone will be faster than you. Everyone.

[[AC:Role-Playing
bridge.
* ''Mario Party 9'' having linear maps and all players traveling together in a vehicle is this to some fans as they felt it was too far a deviation from the original series and being together in a vehicle robs a sense of control for players.
* ''Mario Party 10'' has Amiibo Party, a mode designed as a simplistic throwback to earlier ''Mario Party'' games. The most obvious complaint is that you have to purchase compatible Amiibos just to play the mode. But even when you get past that, there remains one insanely annoying mechanic: if you're playing as an Amiibo (and at least one person must be), you cannot roll the die, pick up items, use them, or stop a spinner without physically touching your Amiibo to the gamepad. Every time. It only gets more crowded when multiple players use Amiibos.
* Bowser Party in ''Mario Party 10'' stacks the entire game unfavorably toward the team running from Bowser. It allows Bowser to reroll his dice if his roll doesn't reach the team as well as gain a bonus when the team reaches the home stretch. Furthermore, the end of the board has tons of Bowser Jr. spaces ready to send the team back or take their hearts. Winning isn't impossible for the team, but it'll certainly take a lot of luck, which makes it an infuriating game to play for some players.
* More generally, the fact that all the minigames in any game are initially locked and there's no way to play them without randomly unlocking them while doing the boards has never sat well with the JustHereForGodzilla crowd who are only interested in the minigames. (Especially since most party games allow the players to jump into the minigames right out of the gate.) This was fixed in ''Mario Party 9'', ''Mario Party: Island Tour,'' and ''Mario Party 10,'' but returned in ''Mario Party: Star Rush,'' with the key difference being that three minigames are available by default.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Role-Playing
Games]]




[[AC:Sports Games]]

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\n[[AC:Sports [[/folder]]

[[folder:Sports
Games]]



* ''Mario Superstar Baseball'':
** Getting each character's Star Missions if you want to use their Superstar version. The requirements must be done in Challenge Mode, with a minimum difficulty setting and can range from hitting a homerun, getting MVP or stealing a base, to dropping a squeeze bunt or getting a minimum score in a minigame. Particularly hard were Mario's "Get a Perfect Game" which had you win ''without the opponent getting a single hit'' or Baby Mario's "catch a booted ball" which is a LuckBasedMission consisting in him getting a batted ball to hit him and then catching it before it touches the ground.
** The game does not even indicate the existence of some of the mechanics needed for these missions. It also doesn't bother to explain any of the baseball jargon in the descriptions, so if you aren't an avid follower of real baseball, which is quite likely if you don't live in America or Japan, a lot of missions will leave you not even understanding what you're supposed to be doing. There's GuideDangIt, and then there's this.



* In the original ''Mario Superstar Baseball'':
** Getting each character's Star Missions if you want to use their Superstar version. The requirements must be done in Challenge Mode, with a minimum difficulty setting and can range from hitting a homerun, getting MVP or stealing a base, to dropping a squeeze bunt or getting a minimum score in a minigame. Particularly hard were Mario's "Get a Perfect Game" which had you win ''without the opponent getting a single hit'' or Baby Mario's "catch a booted ball" which is a LuckBasedMission consisting in him getting a batted ball to hit him and then catching it before it touches the ground.
** The game does not even indicate the existence of some of the mechanics needed for these missions. It also doesn't bother to explain any of the baseball jargon in the descriptions, so if you aren't an avid follower of real baseball, which is quite likely if you don't live in America or Japan, a lot of missions will leave you not even understanding what you're supposed to be doing. There's GuideDangIt, and then there's this.

[[AC:Other Games]]

to:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Other Games]]
* In ''VideoGame/LuigisMansion'':
** The poisonous mushrooms shrink Luigi, disable his vacuum, and make him lose some coins. They don't make
the original ''Mario Superstar Baseball'':
** Getting each character's Star Missions if you want to use their Superstar version. The requirements must be done in Challenge Mode, with a minimum difficulty setting and can range from hitting a homerun, getting MVP or stealing a base, to dropping a squeeze bunt or getting a minimum score in a minigame. Particularly hard were Mario's "Get a Perfect Game" which had you win ''without the opponent getting a single hit'' or Baby Mario's "catch a booted ball" which is a LuckBasedMission consisting in him getting a batted ball to hit him and then
game harder, just more annoying, especially when catching it before it touches Portrait Ghosts and Speedy Spirit.
** In
the ground.
basement, one room has dirt piles which take a while to clean up and they return every time you come back into the room.
** The further in the game you get, the Boos become more annoying to capture since their health is now in the triple digits and they can potentially escape into a room you can't enter yet. And at any time in the game, it's possible for a Boo to escape through a wall into a place where Luigi must go through an incredibly convoluted path to enter and chase after it, including escaping from Area 3 to Area 1, which can only be gotten to by going back to the foyer on the first floor, and worst of all, escaping into the Sealed Room, which can only be entered by ''climbing onto the roof and jumping down the chimney.''
** ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'' has an UnexpectedGameplayChange to platforming in your survival horror-lite, with motion controls [[GuideDangIt of which the
game does not even indicate see fit to inform you,]] and that involve holding the existence of some of the mechanics needed [=3DS=] perfectly still for these missions. It also doesn't bother to explain any extended periods of the baseball jargon time while Luigi inches excruciatingly slowly forward on a tightrope over a bottomless pit [[SerialEscalation in the descriptions, so if an ice level, while being buffeted by winds, In a game where you aren't an avid follower of real baseball, which is quite likely if you don't live in America or Japan, a lot of missions will leave you not even understanding what you're supposed only get up to be doing. There's GuideDangIt, and then there's this.

[[AC:Other Games]]
one extra life per level.]]


Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]


** Hey, everybody, do you like having an UnexpectedGameplayChange to platforming in your survival horror-lite? With motion controls [[GuideDangIt of which the game does not see fit to inform you,]] and that involve holding the [=3DS=] perfectly still for extended periods of time while Luigi inches excruciatingly slowly forward on a tightrope? Over a bottomless pit? [[SerialEscalation In an ice level? While being buffeted by winds? In a game where you only get up to one extra life per level?]] Then ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'' has a hell of a treat for you!

to:

** Hey, everybody, do you like having ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'' has an UnexpectedGameplayChange to platforming in your survival horror-lite? With horror-lite, with motion controls [[GuideDangIt of which the game does not see fit to inform you,]] and that involve holding the [=3DS=] perfectly still for extended periods of time while Luigi inches excruciatingly slowly forward on a tightrope? Over tightrope over a bottomless pit? pit [[SerialEscalation In in an ice level? While level, while being buffeted by winds? winds, In a game where you only get up to one extra life per level?]] Then ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'' has a hell of a treat for you!level.]]



** The boss weakness system. The bosses (except perhaps the first) have so much HP and defense, you ''need'' to use the right sticker at the right time to have any hope of defeating any of them. What sticker and what time that is, more often than not, is quite a GuideDangIt, and even if you ''do'' figure out partway through the battle what you need, it will most likely be too late anyway; what are the chances of having that particular sticker already in your album ready to use at that moment, given that most of the weaknesses are of the aforementioned "requires extra inventory space" type? The final boss takes this [[UpToEleven to its ultimate]] [[FromBadToWorse and horrible conclusion]], with a '''[[MarathonBoss FIVE-PART]]''' boss battle, ''each'' of which requires specific stickers to complete. And if you do manage to beat a boss without exploiting its weakness, or simply want to fight it normally, [[WhatTheHellPlayer the game has your helper insult you for not doing what it wanted]].

to:

** The boss weakness system. The bosses (except perhaps the first) have so much HP and defense, you ''need'' to use the right sticker at the right time to have any hope of defeating any of them. What sticker and what time that is, more often than not, is quite a GuideDangIt, and even if you ''do'' figure out partway through the battle what you need, it will most likely be too late anyway; what are the chances of having that particular sticker already in your album ready to use at that moment, given that most of the weaknesses are of the aforementioned "requires extra inventory space" type? The final boss takes this [[UpToEleven to its ultimate]] [[FromBadToWorse and horrible conclusion]], with a '''[[MarathonBoss FIVE-PART]]''' five-part]]''' boss battle, ''each'' of which requires specific stickers to complete. And if you do manage to beat a boss without exploiting its weakness, or simply want to fight it normally, [[WhatTheHellPlayer the game has your helper insult you for not doing what it wanted]].


** Those God forsaken block platforms/trains/snakes. You know, from Roy's and Larry's Castle in ''World'', the World 7 Castle and World 8 second Tower in ''New Super Mario Bros.'', Lemmy's Castle in ''New Super Mario Bros. Wii'', various stages in ''New Super Mario Bros. 2'', and in the World 5 Tower and level 7-6 in ''New Super Mario Bros. U''. They go pretty fast, speeding through lots of dangerous obstacles, above bottomless pits and lava, and take the most convoluted paths imaginable, as if the game designers felt extra malicious and wanted to punish the player. [[TheBusCameBack They're back]] in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'', but this time in 3D and with gravity mechanics.
** Coin trails. You know, the ones directed by the D Pad and where you have to hit a P-Switch to turn into temporary blocks. It gets to be very nightmarish when trying to get the secret exit in Valley Ghost House: You need to direct the coin trail up to a ledge with a key to access the secret exit. Unfortunately, the ledge is ''far'' above the top of the screen, you need to direct the coin path to create steps leading up to it, and the hole at the ledge is only big enough for Small Mario, so if you're Big Mario, you better hope you have enough room to try to slide through, or you'll have to take the long, winding path back to the room and start all over again. Notably, many players will take the simpler (and less sanity-taxing) option of using a Cape to fly up to the ledge, which Mario can just ''barely'' stand on if he flies up right next to it. From there, Mario can squeeze through the gap by ducking and jumping.

to:

** Those God forsaken block platforms/trains/snakes. You know, from Roy's and Larry's Castle in ''World'', the World 7 Castle and World 8 second Tower in ''New Super Mario Bros.'', Lemmy's Castle in ''New Super Mario Bros. Wii'', various stages in ''New Super Mario Bros. 2'', and in the World 5 Tower and level 7-6 in ''New Super Mario Bros. U''. They The Snake Blocks go pretty fast, speeding through lots of dangerous obstacles, above bottomless pits and lava, and take the most convoluted paths imaginable, as if the game designers felt extra malicious and wanted to punish the player. [[TheBusCameBack They're back]] in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'', but this time in 3D and with gravity mechanics.
** Coin trails. You know, the ones The coin trails directed by the D Pad and where you have to hit a P-Switch to turn into temporary blocks. It gets to be very nightmarish when trying to get the secret exit in Valley Ghost House: You need to direct the coin trail up to a ledge with a key to access the secret exit. Unfortunately, the ledge is ''far'' above the top of the screen, you need to direct the coin path to create steps leading up to it, and the hole at the ledge is only big enough for Small Mario, so if you're Big Mario, you better hope you have enough room to try to slide through, or you'll have to take the long, winding path back to the room and start all over again. Notably, many players will take the simpler (and less sanity-taxing) option of using a Cape to fly up to the ledge, which Mario can just ''barely'' stand on if he flies up right next to it. From there, Mario can squeeze through the gap by ducking and jumping.



** Mario/Luigi on the overworld map moves at a tortoise's pace. It's not really noticeable if you're merely moving from one level to the next, but if you want the Top Secret Area and you're somewhere like Chocolate Island or Valley of Bowser where lives are easily lost, and you're not using the Star World, then you have to waste a fair number of minutes plodding all the way to the Top Secret Area, and then you have to plod all the way back; it's a vexingly slow and tedious process. In the GBA release, you can warp straight to whichever level you want... once you've reached all 96 goals, that is!

to:

** Mario/Luigi on the overworld map moves at a tortoise's pace. It's not really noticeable if you're merely moving from one level to the next, but if you want the Top Secret Area and you're somewhere like Chocolate Island or Valley of Bowser where lives are easily lost, and you're not using the Star World, then you have to waste a fair number of minutes plodding all the way to the Top Secret Area, and then you have to plod all the way back; it's a vexingly slow and tedious process. In the GBA release, you can warp straight to whichever level you want... once you've reached all 96 goals, that is!is.



** The Mega Mushroom from the first game. Initially, it's fun to destroy everything in your way, but if you destroy a pipe that leads to a Star Coin, then tough break! Time to start the level all over.

to:

** The Mega Mushroom from the first game. Initially, it's fun to destroy everything in your way, but if you destroy a pipe that leads to a Star Coin, then tough break! Time it's time to start the level all over.



* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'', ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'' and ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' all share a mechanic that causes you to lose a life when you ''fail a race or minigame''. Losing a race against [[VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine Il Piantissimo]] or taking too long to complete the squid race? It's ''lethal!''

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'', ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy'' and ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' all share a mechanic that causes you to lose a life when you ''fail a race or minigame''. Losing a race against [[VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine Il Piantissimo]] or taking too long to complete the squid race? It's ''lethal!''



** The red coin missions and '''especially''' the blue coin locations drove everyone nuts simply due to the sheer number of them in the game. However, if players wanted to beat it 100%, then they must beat them all. The blue coins deserve special mention. In Mario 64 they were worth five coins, but in Sunshine they are a special currency used to obtain Shine Sprites...the same things Mario was tasked with retrieving to clear his sentence. Story headaches aside, there is also no checklist whatsoever for blue coins. If you find you missed one somewhere and your memory isn't helping you, you have massive levels to go over again and again until you find out which ones you missed. Oh, and some are only available in certain episodes of the level too.

to:

** The red coin missions and '''especially''' the blue coin locations drove everyone nuts simply due to the sheer number of them in the game. However, if players wanted to beat it 100%, then they must beat them all. The blue coins deserve special mention. In Mario 64 they were worth five coins, but in Sunshine they are a special currency used to obtain Shine Sprites...Sprites, the same things Mario was tasked with retrieving to clear his sentence. Story headaches aside, there is also no checklist whatsoever for blue coins. If you find you missed one somewhere and your memory isn't helping you, you have massive levels to go over again and again until you find out which ones you missed. Oh, and some are only available in certain episodes of the level too.



** ''Yoshi'' of all things manages to amount to a massive one of these. Firstly not only does Yoshi die in one hit if he touches water (which is ''everywhere''), but he also dies if he goes too long without eating fruit. This turns every Yoshi mission into a TimedMission where one slip up costs you Yoshi and forces you to start over. Secondly nearly every Yoshi mission simply involves relying on Yoshi to reach one of the F.L.U.D.D.-less levels as mentioned above. While riding Yoshi feels like a rewarding powerup in most Mario games, in Sunshine it simply feels like an awkward difficult chore.

to:

** ''Yoshi'' ''Yoshi'', of all things things, manages to amount to a massive one of these. Firstly not only does Yoshi die in one hit if he touches water (which is ''everywhere''), but he also dies if he goes too long without eating fruit. This turns every Yoshi mission into a TimedMission where one slip up costs you Yoshi and forces you to start over. Secondly nearly every Yoshi mission simply involves relying on Yoshi to reach one of the F.L.U.D.D.-less levels as mentioned above. While riding Yoshi feels like a rewarding powerup in most Mario games, in Sunshine it simply feels like an awkward difficult chore.


* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'' has one major problem in the original NES release: ''[[SaveGameLimits there is no saving at all]]!'' And the game spans eight entire lands with lots of things to do between "begin World 1-1" and "beat Bowser", as there are now ''90'' levels instead of 32, 52 or 20 like in the previous games respectively. Sure, you can use {{Warp Whistle}}s to "resume" your game, but you have to start from the very beginning of the world with no forts destroyed or keyhole doors removed, as well as an empty item inventory. This is why every subsequent release has included some form of saving, whether it's save files in the ''VideoGame/SuperMarioAllStars'' CompilationRerelease or suspend saves in the UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole releases.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'' has one major problem in the original NES release: ''[[SaveGameLimits there is no saving at all]]!'' And all]],'' and the game spans eight entire lands with lots of things to do between "begin World 1-1" and "beat Bowser", as there are now ''90'' levels instead of 32, 52 or 20 like in the previous games respectively. Sure, you can use {{Warp Whistle}}s to "resume" your game, but you have to start from the very beginning of the world with no forts destroyed or keyhole doors removed, as well as an empty item inventory. This is why every subsequent release has included some form of saving, whether it's save files in the ''VideoGame/SuperMarioAllStars'' CompilationRerelease or suspend saves in the UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole releases.


** Wario's Battle Canyon and Peach's Birthday Cake from the first game were also more luck based than usual as the former causes players to be blasted out of cannons and land on another island, the problem is that it's difficult landing in just the right spot causing players to potentially land after Toad while the latter forces the players to pay a lottery when they reach the board's only split path to determine whether they meet Toad or Bowser.

to:

** Wario's Battle Canyon and Peach's Birthday Cake from the first game were also more luck based than usual as the former causes players to be blasted out of cannons and land on another island, the problem is that it's difficult landing in just the right spot causing players to potentially land after Toad while the latter forces the players to pay coins to play a lottery when they reach the board's only split path to determine whether they meet Toad or Bowser.Bowser. There are more details about Peach's Birthday Cake on [[ThatOneLevel/MarioParty this page]].

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