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History Recap / DoctorWhoS9E1DayOfTheDaleks

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* {{Retraux}}: The Special Edition" DVD release has a brand-new version of the "only three Daleks" onslaught, new voices by Dalek aficionado Nicholas Briggs, and new CGI sequences. An ''unbelievable'' amount of care was taken to ensure that nothing would look out of place within the 1973 milieu: the Dalek voices were re-created with older, analog equipment (also, Briggs uses a slightly less-deranged voice set than he does on the New Series); the new film sequences were done with a period BBC film camera; and the CGI was made to look a little more like a model set.

to:

* {{Retraux}}: The Special Edition" DVD release has a brand-new version of the "only three Daleks" onslaught, new voices by Dalek aficionado Nicholas Briggs, and new CGI sequences. An ''unbelievable'' amount of care was taken to ensure that nothing would look out of place within the 1973 1972 milieu: the Dalek voices were re-created with older, analog analogue equipment (also, Briggs uses a slightly less-deranged voice set than he does on the New Series); the new film sequences were done with a period BBC film camera; and the CGI was made to look a little more like a model set.


* PeaceConference: The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E2TheMindOfEvil last one]] obviously didn't work, so another one is held to stop a situation turning into WorldWarThree. A bomb going off starts that war and leads to the Daleks taking over Earth, which was what some guerrillas have traveled back in time to prevent by killing the man they thought was responsible. He wasn't and by blowing up the conference themselves, they caused their own problem. The Doctor is able to prevent this from occurring.

to:

* PeaceConference: The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E2TheMindOfEvil last one]] obviously didn't work, so another one is held to stop a situation turning into WorldWarThree. A bomb going off starts that war and leads to the Daleks taking over Earth, which was what some guerrillas have traveled travelled back in time to prevent by killing the man they thought was responsible. He wasn't and by blowing up the conference themselves, they caused their own problem. The Doctor is able to prevent this from occurring.


The Doctor realises that this is a StableTimeLoop - that the explosion was actually caused by the guerrillas: specifically by Shura, the injured man left behind in the 20th century, trying to fulfill his mission. He gets back to the 20th century in time to have Styles' house evacuated and the pursuing Daleks and Ogrons are destroyed when Shura detonates his bomb.

to:

The Doctor realises that this is a StableTimeLoop - that the explosion was actually caused by the guerrillas: specifically by Shura, the injured man left behind in the 20th century, trying to fulfill fulfil his mission. He gets back to the 20th century in time to have Styles' house evacuated and the pursuing Daleks and Ogrons are destroyed when Shura detonates his bomb.



* TheQuisling: The Controller, name-dropped as such by the Doctor, though he also fulfills the RedemptionEqualsDeath trope.

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* TheQuisling: The Controller, name-dropped as such by the Doctor, though he also fulfills fulfils the RedemptionEqualsDeath trope.


* BatmanGrabsAGun: Near the end of episode two, the Doctor fires one of the guerrillas' disintegrator guns in self-defence at an Ogron, vaporising it. This is one of only a handful of occasion where the Doctor uses deadly force against an opponent other than a Dalek or Cyberman. In the special edition, the Doctor also kills a second Ogron inside the house with the disintegrator pistol.

to:

* BatmanGrabsAGun: Near the end of episode two, Episode Two, the Doctor fires one of the guerrillas' disintegrator guns in self-defence at an Ogron, vaporising it. This is one of only a handful of occasion where the Doctor uses deadly force against an opponent other than a Dalek or Cyberman. In the special edition, the Doctor also kills a second Ogron inside the house with the disintegrator pistol.



* EnhancedOnDVD: The DVD special release does an ''extensive'' overhaul of the episode. It adds a lot of CGI in place of the primitive green screen-esque colour separation overlay effects (the monitors look more futuristic, the Dalek headquarters exterior shot is completely different and the building looks more intimidating with flying vehicles in the background), laser blasts, the extermination effect is not the screen flashing and streamers popping out of the Daleks but actual blue energy beams coming out of the guns and people turning see-through with visible skeletons when hit and Ogrons being more graphically disintegrated (controversially adding a scene where the Doctor [[BatmanGrabsAGun kills another Ogron]]). It also has veteran Dalek voice actor Creator/NicholasBriggs portray the Daleks in place of the original and admittedly shaky voice acting. (The series had tried to write off the Daleks and thus didn't have a go-to actor portrayal ready and able, and so the producers brought on two actors, Oliver Gilbert and Peter Messaline, who hadn't been as versed with Dalek voices and by now were out of practice. Neither Messaline nor Gilbert had ever been featured in ''any'' Doctor Who media before, nor since. Roy Skelton would later be called back (alongside future Davros actor Michael Wisher) and become the definitive classic series' voice of the Daleks.) Most notably, the climactic battle at Auderly House had entire sequences re-filmed ''decades'' after the serial had been released through funding by 2 entertain to show a true army of Daleks and Ogrons duking it out versus using new and borrowed costumes, when the original tried to create the illusion of an army by re-using the same shots of only a few Daleks and Ogrons rather unconvincingly. In fact, the production team may have possibly been limited to '''two''' Daleks by Creator/JonPertwee's estimate (again, the series nearly wrote off the Daleks and didn't have that many props on hand), nowhere near enough to depict a fearsome battle.

to:

* EnhancedOnDVD: The DVD special release does an ''extensive'' overhaul of the episode.story. It adds a lot of CGI in place of the primitive green screen-esque colour separation overlay effects (the monitors look more futuristic, the Dalek headquarters exterior shot is completely different and the building looks more intimidating with flying vehicles in the background), laser blasts, the extermination effect is not the screen flashing and streamers popping out of the Daleks but actual blue energy beams coming out of the guns and people turning see-through with visible skeletons when hit and Ogrons being more graphically disintegrated (controversially adding a scene where the Doctor [[BatmanGrabsAGun kills another Ogron]]). It also has veteran Dalek voice actor Creator/NicholasBriggs portray the Daleks in place of the original and admittedly shaky voice acting. (The series had tried to write off the Daleks and thus didn't have a go-to actor portrayal ready and able, and so the producers brought on two actors, Oliver Gilbert and Peter Messaline, who hadn't been as versed with Dalek voices and by now were out of practice. Neither Messaline nor Gilbert had ever been featured in ''any'' Doctor Who media before, nor since. Roy Skelton would later be called back (alongside future Davros actor Michael Wisher) and become the definitive classic series' voice of the Daleks.) Most notably, the climactic battle at Auderly House had entire sequences re-filmed ''decades'' after the serial had been released through funding by 2 entertain to show a true army of Daleks and Ogrons duking it out versus using new and borrowed costumes, when the original tried to create the illusion of an army by re-using the same shots of only a few Daleks and Ogrons rather unconvincingly. In fact, the production team may have possibly been limited to '''two''' Daleks by Creator/JonPertwee's estimate (again, the series nearly wrote off the Daleks and didn't have that many props on hand), nowhere near enough to depict a fearsome battle.


* BatmanGrabsAGun: The Doctor disintegrates an Ogron with a laser gun.

to:

* BatmanGrabsAGun: The Near the end of episode two, the Doctor disintegrates fires one of the guerrillas' disintegrator guns in self-defence at an Ogron, vaporising it. This is one of only a handful of occasion where the Doctor uses deadly force against an opponent other than a Dalek or Cyberman. In the special edition, the Doctor also kills a second Ogron inside the house with a laser gun.the disintegrator pistol.

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* IdiotBall: Grabbed by the Daleks with their frontal assault on the peace conference. Not only were the delegates evacuated long before the Daleks got near the house, an obvious alien invasion is just the sort of thing to make the wars the Daleks want to start less likely.

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* DisconnectedByDeath: The manager of the factory is on the radio to a guerilla cell when he is killed by an Ogron.

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* WeWillNotHavePocketsIntheFuture: 22nd century does not seem to include pockets. Especially noticeable with the guerillas, who are wearing combat fatigues with no pockets. Shura has to stuff a communicator inside his tunic in order to carry it, and later does the same thing with a bomb.

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* ConvenientlyPlacedSharpThing: The Doctor rubs his bonds against a wine rack in the cellar to cut his wrists free.

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* GrievousBottleyHarm: Jo smashes a wine flask over the head of an Ogron.


* ArbitrarySkepticism: By this point, the Brigadier's already dealt with a man who can change his face and travels through time, not to mention an incredible variety of aliens, but doesn't seem to believe in ghosts. In fairness, he's right--the "ghosts" the Doctor mentions are ones from the future, not the past.



* CrapsackWorld: Future version of Earth, ruled by Daleks

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* CrapsackWorld: Future version of Earth, ruled by DaleksDaleks.



* {{Jerkass}}: Captain Yates suddenly turns into one for this story, in particular during the first episode, when Jo fetches Benton some food and drink, only for Yates to chase Benton away and take it for himself. When Jo calls him out on it, Yates flat-out admits abusing his rank for the sake of feeding his face.



* TheQuisling: The Controller, though he also fulfills the RedemptionEqualsDeath trope.

to:

* TheQuisling: The Controller, name-dropped as such by the Doctor, though he also fulfills the RedemptionEqualsDeath trope.


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* {{Troll}}: Captain Yates suddenly turns into one for this story, in particular during the first episode, when Jo fetches Benton some food and drink, only for Yates to chase Benton away and take it for himself. When Jo calls him out on it, Yates flat-out admits abusing his rank for the sake of feeding his face.


* PeaceConference: The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E2TheMindOfEvil last one]] obviously didn't work, so another one is held to stop a situation turning into WorldWarThree. A bomb going off starts that war and leads to the Daleks taking over Earth, which was what some guerrillas have traveled back in time to prevent by killing the man they thought was responsible. [[spoiler: He wasn't and by blowing up the conference themselves, they caused their own problem. The Doctor is able to prevent this from occurring.]]

to:

* PeaceConference: The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E2TheMindOfEvil last one]] obviously didn't work, so another one is held to stop a situation turning into WorldWarThree. A bomb going off starts that war and leads to the Daleks taking over Earth, which was what some guerrillas have traveled back in time to prevent by killing the man they thought was responsible. [[spoiler: He wasn't and by blowing up the conference themselves, they caused their own problem. The Doctor is able to prevent this from occurring.]]


-->''"I assure you, Brigadier, there's nothing to worry about. Tell Styles that. Tell the Prime Minister. And, Brigadier, be particularly sure to tell it to the Marines."''

to:

-->''"I assure you, Brigadier, there's nothing -->''"You tell Captain Yates not to worry about. worry. Everything's fine. Tell old Styles that. Tell too and the Prime Minister. And, Oh, and, Brigadier, be particularly sure don't forget to tell it to the Marines.marines."''



** This was actually down to the decision to make the Ogrons into simpletons being taken in between the shooting of the first two and last two episodes: Ogrons only speak three times in the whole story, including twice in that scene, whereas they were scripted as being quite erudite. As originally recorded, the first Ogron line was "Mission accomplished. Target found and eliminated." That line was re-recorded (the scene suddenly cuts to a close-up at that point) but the second one wasn't.



-->''"I assure you, Brigadier, there's nothing to worry about. Tell Styles that. Tell the Prime Minister. And, Brigadier, be particularly sure to tell it to the Marines."''

to:

-->''"I assure you, Brigadier, there's nothing -->''"You tell Captain Yates not to worry about. worry. Everything's fine. Tell old Styles that. Tell too and the Prime Minister. And, Oh, and, Brigadier, be particularly sure don't forget to tell it to the Marines.marines."''


* TimeyWimeyBall: One of the earliest in ''Doctor Who''. Had already been touched on in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27TheSpaceMuseum The Space Museum]]" but this could be seen as the TropeCodifier.

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* TimeyWimeyBall: One of the earliest in ''Doctor Who''. Had already been touched on in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27TheSpaceMuseum "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E7TheSpaceMuseum The Space Museum]]" but this could be seen as the TropeCodifier.


* PantyShot: Well, what do you think happens when Jo climbs down a long ladder whilst wearing a miniskirt?

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* PantyShot: Well, what do you think happens when Jo [[SkirtsAndLadders climbs down a long ladder whilst wearing a miniskirt?miniskirt]]?


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* SpoilerTitle: A particularly bad one as the Daleks hadn't been seen in five years.

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