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''Laughing Stock'' is the final album by British group Music/TalkTalk, embarking on an [[NewSoundAlbum even further departure]] from their SynthPop[=/=]NewWaveMusic beginnings that began with their previous album, ''Spirit of Eden'', and letting their jazz influences and experimental leanings shine through. Released on September 16, 1991, ''Laughing Stock'' is notable and sometimes referred to as being a [[IAmTheBand Mark Hollis]] improvisation session with a bunch of guest artists; bassist Paul Webb left the band prior to recording, and Hollis hired a large ensemble for recordings (to put it into perspective, the amount of violists featured in this album is ''seven'').

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''Laughing Stock'' is the fifth and final album by British group Music/TalkTalk, embarking on an [[NewSoundAlbum even further departure]] from their SynthPop[=/=]NewWaveMusic beginnings that began with their previous album, ''Spirit of Eden'', and letting their jazz influences and experimental leanings shine through. Released on September 16, 1991, ''Laughing Stock'' is notable and sometimes referred to as being a [[IAmTheBand Mark Hollis]] improvisation session with a bunch of guest artists; bassist Paul Webb left the band prior to recording, and Hollis hired a large ensemble for recordings (to put it into perspective, the amount of violists featured in this album is ''seven'').



* EpicRocking: Only one song, "Runeii", is under five minutes long (and even that song's merely two seconds shy). "After the Flood" and "New Grass" in particular stand out.

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* EpicRocking: Only one song, "Runeii", is under five minutes long (and even that song's merely two seconds shy). "After the Flood" and "New Grass" in particular stand out.out, both being over 9 and a half minutes.



* NewSoundAlbum: Listening to this, it's hard to believe the band was making cheap synthpop almost a decade before.

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* NewSoundAlbum: Listening to this, it's hard to believe the band was making cheap Music/DuranDuran-esque synthpop almost a decade before.


* IAmTheBand: Mark Hollis during this album.

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* IAmTheBand: Mark Hollis during this album.album, despite the presence of long-time drummer Lee Harris.



* NewSoundAlbum: Listening to this, it's hard to believe the band was making cheap synthpop just a few years before.

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* NewSoundAlbum: Listening to this, it's hard to believe the band was making cheap synthpop just almost a few years decade before.


* ThrowItIn: "Ascension Day" was nearly 12 minutes long, but the recording suddenly stopped at the 6-minute mark. Due to the improvisational nature of the album, the take was kept.
* UncommonTime: "Ascension Day" is in 7/4 and "After the Flood" is at least partially in 10/4.

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* ThrowItIn: "Ascension Day" was nearly 12 minutes long, but the recording suddenly stopped at the 6-minute mark. Due to the improvisational nature of the album, the take was kept.
* UncommonTime: "Ascension Day" is in 7/4 and "After the Flood" is at least partially in 10/4.10/4.
----


* UncommonTime: "Ascension Day" is in 7/4 and "After the Flood" is (mostly) in 10/4.

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* UncommonTime: "Ascension Day" is in 7/4 and "After the Flood" is (mostly) at least partially in 10/4.


* UncommonTime: "Ascension Day" is in 7/4.

to:

* UncommonTime: "Ascension Day" is in 7/4.7/4 and "After the Flood" is (mostly) in 10/4.


* ThrowItIn: "Ascension Day" was nearly 12 minutes long, but the recording suddenly stopped at the 6-minute mark. Due to the improvisational nature of the album, the take was kept.

to:

* ThrowItIn: "Ascension Day" was nearly 12 minutes long, but the recording suddenly stopped at the 6-minute mark. Due to the improvisational nature of the album, the take was kept.kept.
* UncommonTime: "Ascension Day" is in 7/4.


* FadingIntoTheNextSong: "After the Flood" into "Taphead".

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* FadingIntoTheNextSong: "After the Flood" into "Taphead"."Taphead" on CD copies outside the US; American CD copies lack the crossfade effect and instead feature "After the Flood" and "Taphead" as wholly separate tracks, as on the LP release. Interestingly, the lack of a cross-fade ends up highlighting a brief four-second guitar warmup at the start of "Taphead" that the crossfade on most CD copies obscures.


[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/laughing_stock.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/laughing_stock.org/pmwiki/pub/images/5_laughing_stock_lp.jpg]]


''Laughing Stock'', while somewhat criticised as being self-indulgent and pretentious upon release, has since gone on to critical acclaim. It's now recognised as one of the TropeMakers for PostRock, alongside ''Music/{{Spiderland}}''. While Talk Talk would break up and go their separate ways, the album still generates praise and respect amongst critics.

to:

''Laughing Stock'', while somewhat criticised as being self-indulgent and pretentious upon release, has since gone on to critical acclaim. It's now recognised as one of the TropeMakers for PostRock, alongside ''Music/{{Spiderland}}''. While Talk Talk would break up and go their separate ways, ways shortly after its' completion, the album still generates praise and respect amongst critics.


* LighterAndSofter[=/=]DarkerAndEdgier: It's more artsy and bohemian compared to Music/{{Slint}}'s ''Music/{{Spiderland}}'', but heavier in mood in comparison to ''Spirit of Eden''.

to:

* LighterAndSofter[=/=]DarkerAndEdgier: It's more artsy and bohemian compared to Music/{{Slint}}'s ''Music/{{Spiderland}}'', but heavier in mood and more fractured in comparison to ''Spirit of Eden''.


''Laughing Stock'' is the final album by British group Music/TalkTalk, embarking on an [[NewSoundAlbum even further departure]] from their SynthPop[=/=]NewWave beginnings that began with their previous album, ''Spirit of Eden'', and letting their jazz influences and experimental leanings shine through. Released on September 16, 1991, ''Laughing Stock'' is notable and sometimes referred to as being a [[IAmTheBand Mark Hollis]] improvisation session with a bunch of guest artists; bassist Paul Webb left the band prior to recording, and Hollis hired a large ensemble for recordings (to put it into perspective, the amount of violists featured in this album is ''seven'').

to:

''Laughing Stock'' is the final album by British group Music/TalkTalk, embarking on an [[NewSoundAlbum even further departure]] from their SynthPop[=/=]NewWave SynthPop[=/=]NewWaveMusic beginnings that began with their previous album, ''Spirit of Eden'', and letting their jazz influences and experimental leanings shine through. Released on September 16, 1991, ''Laughing Stock'' is notable and sometimes referred to as being a [[IAmTheBand Mark Hollis]] improvisation session with a bunch of guest artists; bassist Paul Webb left the band prior to recording, and Hollis hired a large ensemble for recordings (to put it into perspective, the amount of violists featured in this album is ''seven'').


'''''Laughing Stock''''' is the final album by British group Music/TalkTalk, embarking on an [[NewSoundAlbum even further departure]] from their SynthPop[=/=]NewWave beginnings that began with their previous album, ''Spirit of Eden'', and letting their jazz influences and experimental leanings shine through. Released on September 16, 1991, ''Laughing Stock'' is notable and sometimes referred to as being a [[IAmTheBand Mark Hollis]] improvisation session with a bunch of guest artists; bassist Paul Webb left the band prior to recording, and Hollis hired a large ensemble for recordings (to put it into perspective, the amount of violists featured in this album is ''seven'').

to:

'''''Laughing Stock''''' ''Laughing Stock'' is the final album by British group Music/TalkTalk, embarking on an [[NewSoundAlbum even further departure]] from their SynthPop[=/=]NewWave beginnings that began with their previous album, ''Spirit of Eden'', and letting their jazz influences and experimental leanings shine through. Released on September 16, 1991, ''Laughing Stock'' is notable and sometimes referred to as being a [[IAmTheBand Mark Hollis]] improvisation session with a bunch of guest artists; bassist Paul Webb left the band prior to recording, and Hollis hired a large ensemble for recordings (to put it into perspective, the amount of violists featured in this album is ''seven'').


* StylisticSuck: The guitar at the end of "Ascension Day" is intentionally played off-tempo and adds to the chaos of the song's closing moments.

to:

* StylisticSuck: The guitar at the end of "Ascension Day" is intentionally played off-tempo and adds to the chaos of the song's closing moments.moments.
* ThrowItIn: "Ascension Day" was nearly 12 minutes long, but the recording suddenly stopped at the 6-minute mark. Due to the improvisational nature of the album, the take was kept.


* PostRock: TropeMaker alongside ''Music/{{Spiderland}}''.

to:

* PostRock: TropeMaker alongside ''Music/{{Spiderland}}''.''Music/{{Spiderland}}''.
* StylisticSuck: The guitar at the end of "Ascension Day" is intentionally played off-tempo and adds to the chaos of the song's closing moments.


* LighterAndSofter[=/=]DarkerAndEdgier: It's more artsy and bohemian compared to Music/{{Slint}}'s ''Music/{{Spiderland}}'', but decidedly darker when compared to ''Spirit of Eden''.

to:

* LighterAndSofter[=/=]DarkerAndEdgier: It's more artsy and bohemian compared to Music/{{Slint}}'s ''Music/{{Spiderland}}'', but decidedly darker when compared heavier in mood in comparison to ''Spirit of Eden''.

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