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* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars''[[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS1E19StormOverRyloth , "Storm Over Ryloth"]]: Ahsoka gets her first command, of Blue Squadron, and her actions cause the deaths of all but two of the men she's leading. When Anakin is talking to her about it he tells her that such is the reality of command, before going to tell the Mace (and Obi-Wan) about their failure to make any progress and take responsibility for the loss of Blue Squadron and the ''Redeemer''.


* Say what you will about modern political leaders, but many of them live their lives in a fishbowl and are ruthlessly scrutinized by the media, their political opponents, and online bloggers. Even the smallest mistakes and misstatements can blow up in one's face, particularly in the modern age when blogs, Twitter, and other online media can spread news almost immediately. It gets worse when you consider the level of personal venom some commentators direct at them, which in some cases would be grounds for slander or libel if made against a private citizen. And then there's what happens if your family gets dragged into it...

to:

* Say what you will about modern political leaders, but many of them live their lives in a fishbowl and are ruthlessly scrutinized by the media, their political opponents, and online bloggers. Even the smallest mistakes and misstatements can blow up in one's face, particularly in the modern age when blogs, Twitter, and other online media can spread news almost immediately. Imagine if almost everything you said, every expression you made, was broadcast to the world and mercilessly picked apart across the internet and cable channels. It gets worse when you consider the level of personal venom some commentators direct at them, which in some cases would be grounds for slander or libel if made against a private citizen. And then there's what happens if your family gets dragged into it...


* The last arc of the ''ComicBook/XWingSeries'' comics featured this pretty clearly. Wedge, helping make plans for an operation to rescue a defecting Imperial, accepts that he and his people will be the ones who have to make sure any potential disaster stays potential. They have to fly cover, and if they can't adjust to any surprises... Later in the arc, after things went wrong, the Rebel Alliance Council look over the situation and decide that they can't allocate any more forces to helping their people out, to Leia's misery. She'd like to gather up Luke and Han and Lando and pull a BigDamnHeroes moment, but her sphere of responsibility is so much wider now, and she has to apply to other conflicts.

to:

* The last arc of the ''ComicBook/XWingSeries'' ''ComicBook/XWingRogueSquadron'' comics featured this pretty clearly. Wedge, helping make plans for an operation to rescue a defecting Imperial, accepts that he and his people will be the ones who have to make sure any potential disaster stays potential. They have to fly cover, and if they can't adjust to any surprises... Later in the arc, after things went wrong, the Rebel Alliance Council look over the situation and decide that they can't allocate any more forces to helping their people out, to Leia's misery. She'd like to gather up Luke and Han and Lando and pull a BigDamnHeroes moment, but her sphere of responsibility is so much wider now, and she has to apply to other conflicts.



* [[ComicBook/XWingSeries Wedge Antilles]] sometimes falls under this trope, mostly when pilots under his command are dying. He does have to write the letters back to their families and takes a little comfort that ItNeverGetsAnyEasier.
** Mon Mothma, Garm Bel Iblis, and Bail Organa were the three most significant members of the Rebellion until Organa's death at [[EarthShatteringKaboom Alderaan]]. After that, Iblis got uneasy about the way Mothma was directing things and left to make his own Rebellion. The events of ''Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy'' let Iblis see things differently.
--->'''Iblis''': After all these years, I finally understand why she does things the way she does. I've always assumed that she was gathering more and more power to herself simply because she was in love with power. But I was wrong. With everything she does there are lives hanging in the balance. And she's terrified of trusting anyone else with those lives.\\

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* [[ComicBook/XWingSeries ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':
** ''Literature/XWingSeries'':
Wedge Antilles]] Antilles sometimes falls under this trope, mostly when pilots under his command are dying. He does have to write the letters back to their families and takes a little comfort that ItNeverGetsAnyEasier.
** Mon Mothma, Garm Bel Iblis, and Bail Organa were the three most significant members of the Rebellion until Organa's death at [[EarthShatteringKaboom Alderaan]]. After that, Bel Iblis got uneasy about the way Mothma was directing things and left to make his own Rebellion. The events of ''Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy'' let Iblis see things differently.
--->'''Iblis''': --->'''Bel Iblis:''' After all these years, I finally understand why she does things the way she does. I've always assumed that she was gathering more and more power to herself simply because she was in love with power. But I was wrong. With everything she does there are lives hanging in the balance. And she's terrified of trusting anyone else with those lives.\\



** In ''Solo Command'', General Han Solo shows a bit of this while commanding the task force sent after Warlord Zsinj. There's mention that all he could do was issue orders and hope they were so good that not many of his people died. They were never so good that ''none'' of his people died. Never.

to:

** In ''Solo Command'', ''[[Literature/XWingSeries Solo Command]]'', General Han Solo shows a bit of this while commanding the task force sent after Warlord Zsinj. There's mention that all he could do was issue orders and hope they were so good that not many of his people died. They were never so good that ''none'' of his people died. Never.


* On ''Series/{{The 100}}'', Clarke's [[CharacterDevelopment character]] [[StoryArc arc]] in Season 2 is built around how, by becoming her people's leader, she's forced to commit increasingly ruthless acts to keep them alive. By the season finale, she's come to view herself as NecessarilyEvil, and can no longer bear to be around her friends and family, because seeing them just reminds her of the horrible things she did in their name. She views accepting this guilt as her responsibility, saying, "I bear it so they don't have to."

to:

* On ''Series/{{The 100}}'', 100}}'':
** A running theme of the series is that the job of "leader" is not an easy one: sometimes, you have to do things that go against everything you stand for in order to protect your people. Jaha had to execute people on the Ark just to ensure PopulationControl and conserve dwindling resources, which clearly took a toll on him. Kane, a WellIntentionedExtremist, had to deal with the guilt of knowing that the people he had culled didn't need to die.
**
Clarke's [[CharacterDevelopment character]] [[StoryArc arc]] in Season season 2 is built around how, by becoming her people's leader, she's forced to commit increasingly ruthless acts to keep them alive. By the season finale, she's come to view herself as NecessarilyEvil, NecessarilyEvil and can no longer bear to be around her friends and family, because seeing them just reminds her of the horrible things she did in their name. She views accepting this guilt as her responsibility, saying, "I bear it so they don't have to."


* In the 1996 TV movie ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Command_(film) Star Command]]'' (aka ''In The Fold''), Captain Ridnaur explains this to a cadet. The commanding officer is [[LonelyAtTheTop alone]] and must appear invincible to encourage confidence among the crew.



[[folder:LiveActionTV]]
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
** Robb starts to feel them when his father's departure and his mother's breakdown leave him in charge in "The Kingsroad". By "Baelor", he's led an army to war and and sacrificed two thousand men for victory. Things only get worse as the war drags on and some of his men start to lose faith despite his victories. In Season 3, his leadership decisions start to put him at odds with some of his more prominent men.
** Daenerys starts to feel them in Season 2, when her people become dependent on her. They only get heavier as her responsibilities increase. She realizes that being a ruler and being a conqueror are not the same things. As Tyrion notes, being a ruler means that they have to be "terrible" and he is pleased that Daenerys is "the right kind of terrible", that is the kind "that prevents her people from being even more so." Dany doesn't like making compromises and concessions to the nobility of Slaver's Bay but she does so anyway, to build some kind of peace in Meereen and moderate multiple factions, and on returning to Westeros, she doesn't like dealing with the picky norms of Westerosi feudalism, namely their endless grudges, feuds and prejudices against Dothraki but decides to proceed slowly if only to prove IAmNotMyFather.
** Alliser Thorne tells Jon that a commander will always face criticism for his decisions, but if he ever begins second-guessing himself he will become indecisive, an even worse trait than being wrong.
** Jon sends his friend Grenn and five others to hold the crucial inner gate even though he knows it is likely a SuicideMission.
** Slightly touched upon with Tywin. He has Seven Kingdoms to run during an open rebellion and the ship of fools and schemers that he governs does not make it any easier. When Tyrion casually asks him if he's enjoying the position, Tywin finds the query outlandish and repeats back the question in disbelief. In the books, Kevan speaks earnestly about how Tywin is a stern but just man of duty doing a tough job for decades with little appreciation or reward.
** Cersei has moments of fragility and self-pity where she laments the hardships of the regency that have fallen on her. Given her pettiness and dismal management, nobody really empathizes with her.
* ''Series/SpaceAboveAndBeyond'': this trope was used several times by the main characters.
* In the 1996 TV movie ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Command_(film) Star Command]]'' (aka ''In The Fold''), Captain Ridnaur explains this to a cadet. The commanding officer is [[LonelyAtTheTop alone]] and must appear invincible to encourage confidence among the crew.

to:

[[folder:LiveActionTV]]
[[folder: Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
** Robb starts to feel them when his father's departure and his mother's breakdown leave him in charge in "The Kingsroad". By "Baelor", he's led an army to war and and sacrificed two thousand men for victory. Things only get worse as the war drags on and some
President David Palmer of his men start to lose faith despite his victories. In Season 3, his leadership decisions start to put him at odds with some of his more prominent men.
** Daenerys starts to feel them
''Series/TwentyFour'' is a lot like this. President Allison Taylor more-so.
* On ''Series/{{The 100}}'', Clarke's [[CharacterDevelopment character]] [[StoryArc arc]]
in Season 2, when 2 is built around how, by becoming her people become dependent on her. They only get heavier people's leader, she's forced to commit increasingly ruthless acts to keep them alive. By the season finale, she's come to view herself as NecessarilyEvil, and can no longer bear to be around her friends and family, because seeing them just reminds her of the horrible things she did in their name. She views accepting this guilt as her responsibilities increase. She realizes that being a ruler and being a conqueror are not the same things. As Tyrion notes, being a ruler means that responsibility, saying, "I bear it so they don't have to be "terrible" and he is pleased that Daenerys is "the right kind of terrible", that is the kind "that prevents her people from being even more so." Dany doesn't like making compromises and concessions to the nobility of Slaver's Bay but she does so anyway, to build some kind of peace in Meereen and moderate multiple factions, and on returning to Westeros, she doesn't like dealing with the picky norms of Westerosi feudalism, namely their endless grudges, feuds and prejudices against Dothraki but decides to proceed slowly if only to prove IAmNotMyFather.
** Alliser Thorne tells Jon that a commander will always face criticism for his decisions, but if he ever begins second-guessing himself he will become indecisive, an even worse trait than being wrong.
** Jon sends his friend Grenn and five others to hold the crucial inner gate even though he knows it is likely a SuicideMission.
** Slightly touched upon with Tywin. He has Seven Kingdoms to run during an open rebellion and the ship of fools and schemers that he governs does not make it any easier. When Tyrion casually asks him if he's enjoying the position, Tywin finds the query outlandish and repeats back the question in disbelief. In the books, Kevan speaks earnestly about how Tywin is a stern but just man of duty doing a tough job for decades with little appreciation or reward.
** Cersei has moments of fragility and self-pity where she laments the hardships of the regency that have fallen on her. Given her pettiness and dismal management, nobody really empathizes with her.
* ''Series/SpaceAboveAndBeyond'': this trope was used several times by the main characters.
* In the 1996 TV movie ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Command_(film) Star Command]]'' (aka ''In The Fold''), Captain Ridnaur explains this to a cadet. The commanding officer is [[LonelyAtTheTop alone]] and must appear invincible to encourage confidence among the crew.
to."



* ''Series/{{Wings}}'': after Joe leaves Nantucket in 'Joe Blows' due to being overworked, Brian discovers how difficult it is to operate a business.
* President David Palmer of ''Series/TwentyFour'' is a lot like this. President Allison Taylor more-so.
* ''Series/TheWestWing'''s President Bartlet frequently finds himself feeling the full weight of his authority, especially when what the job calls for goes against his personal beliefs.
* Jack from ''Series/{{Lost}}'' is a very reluctant [[TheLeader leader]].
* One of the main motifs in ''Series/TheSopranos'':
** Tony Soprano is very savvy about this issue and is unable to decide which he feels more strongly: the stress or the benefits of being mob boss.
--->'''Tony:''' All due respect, you got no fuckin' idea what it's like to be Number One. Every decision you make affects every facet of every other fuckin' thing. It's too much to deal with almost. And in the end you're completely alone with it all.
** Tony also tries to warn DragonAscendant Johnny Sack about the difficulty of the position once he succeeds in becoming boss of his crew. Johnny falls victims to the chains not long after.
** Silvio has to take the reins for a brief period after Tony is hospitalized with a gunshot. He doesn't last more than a few days because the stresses of the job quickly take a toll on his health.

to:

* ''Series/{{Wings}}'': after Joe leaves Nantucket in 'Joe Blows' due to being overworked, Brian discovers ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'':
** Commander (later Admiral) William Adama. Seeing as
how difficult it is to operate a business.
* President David Palmer of ''Series/TwentyFour'' is a lot like this. President Allison Taylor more-so.
* ''Series/TheWestWing'''s President Bartlet frequently finds himself feeling
the full weight military affairs of all that's left of mankind are in his authority, especially hands, dropping the ball even once means humanity's last chance is gone.
** In the miniseries, at one point the Galactica is hit by a nuke. The damaged section's fires are endangering the ship and the automatic fire suppressors are out. Nearly a hundred of Tyrol's people are fighting the fires with handheld gear...
when what Tigh orders the job calls section to be sealed off and the atmosphere to be vented, putting out the fires and [[ThrownOutTheAirlock killing everyone inside]]. Understandably, Tyrol tries to protest but not only Tigh is his superior officer, they don't really have a choice because [[ColdEquation if they wait until everyone gets out, the fire will reach the fuel lines and blow the whole ship to smithereens]]. Afterwards, Tyrol tries to appeal to Adama and almost breaks down in tears right then and there, had it not for goes against Adama's GetAHoldOfYourselfMan DeathGlare.
--->Forty seconds, sir... All I've needed... was forty seconds...
* Subverted in ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'s Christmas Carol'' when Ebenezar Blackadder sees if he becomes bad
his personal beliefs.
* Jack from ''Series/{{Lost}}''
descendants will rule the Universe, the Ghost of Christmas Present's reaction is a very reluctant [[TheLeader leader]].
* One
'Maybe... Maybe... But would you be happy? Being ruler of the main motifs in ''Series/TheSopranos'':
** Tony Soprano
universe is very savvy about this issue and is unable to decide which he feels more strongly: the stress or the benefits of being mob boss.
--->'''Tony:''' All due respect, you got no fuckin' idea what
not all it's like cracked up to be Number One. Every decision you make affects every facet of every other fuckin' thing. It's too much to deal with almost. And in - there's the end you're completely alone with it all.
** Tony also tries to warn DragonAscendant Johnny Sack about the difficulty of the position once he succeeds in becoming boss of his crew. Johnny falls victims to the chains not
long after.
** Silvio has to take
hours... I mean, you wave at people the reins for a brief period after Tony is hospitalized with a gunshot. He whole time. You're no longer your own boss.' It doesn't last more than a few days work.
* ''Series/{{Borgen}}'' practically runs on this. It's revealed that WhenYouComingHomeDad is in full effect in Borgen, and many politicians divorce or have their marriage ruined
because of this. [[spoiler:By the stresses end of season 1, this happens to Birgitte too.]]
* Series/{{Buffy|TheVampireSlayer}} often felt this way about her calling as the Slayer making her feel different. It bordered on what could be considered supreme egotism sometimes and when faced with one very tough decision [[spoiler:about whether to kill Anya for restarting her vengeance demon ways]] she claimed that the Scooby Gang was not a democracy, that she's the Slayer and eventually all the tough decisions come down to her.
* Aaron "Hotch" Hotchner of ''Series/CriminalMinds'' can be seen often second guessing his own decisions. The best example is in the second part of "The Fisher King", where, after scolding Agent Anderson for not staying with Elle after driving her home [[spoiler:causing her to get shot]], Hotch laments how he forget to tell Anderson to specifically stay with her after driving her home.
* In the ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Two Doctors", a Sontaran admits to having made a "tactical error" and gives the excuse that "it's not easy being commander, the loneliness of supreme responsibility."
* ''Series/{{Dollhouse}}'''s Adelle Dewitt feels this trope pretty hard, though most characters are unaware of how much it weighs on her, thanks to her [[TheWomanWearingTheQueenlyMask Queenly Mask]].
* Israeli satire show ''Eretz Nehederet'' aired [[http://totzeret-haaretz.tumblr.com/post/42509645050/this-song-isnt-relevant-anymore-but-i-got-a this skit]] before the winner
of the job quickly take 2009 elections was declared. It featured a toll on his health.group of former Israeli prime ministers singing a song to both candidates, aimed at the winner-to-be, detailing how awful life would be after they get the job. Subverted by Shim'on Peres, who would still like to be the prime minister again in spite of everything.



* Long story short, pretty much every captain from ''Franchise/StarTrek'' feels this at some point. This includes all the spin-offs, and even one shot captains often wind up feeling the burden of command before their spot is over. Readers of the ''Literature/HoratioHornblower'' books can pick out scenes that mirror ones from the novels, which were a direct inspiration for the series.
** Really, this has been in Trek ever since the ''very first pilot'' of ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'', where [[ThePeteBest Captain Christopher Pike]] discusses the possibility of resigning, tired of being responsible for the lives and deaths of his crew.
** One episode of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' features Troi taking the bridge officer's test, which she keeps failing until she realizes that the win condition is saving the ship by sending a virtual crewman to certain death. This in turn ties into an earlier episode where, due to an accident, Troi is stuck as the senior most officer on the bridge but her rank was conferred based on her counselor position, not her technical or command experience. So she has to rely on the junior officers to explain the situation to her and make a gut call which, based on the above latter episode, she made wrong. It's only by luck that her decision didn't get anyone killed, something that she acknowledges which is what leads her to seek that bridge officer qualification later on.
** Starting with TNG, the captain often isn't permitted to enter dangerous situations as Kirk frequently did; the first officer goes in their place, because the captain is the single most indispensable person on the ship.
** Sisko lives and breathes this trope from day one of ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine''. He has to deal with the volatile and extreme politics of Bajor, the machinations of the Cardassians, the [[spoiler:Dominion War]], his role as Emissary of the Prophets, an (initially) uncooperative first officer, and the difficulties of single fatherhood on top of his regular duties as the commanding officer of one of the busiest and most strategically important space stations.
** Janeway started to embody this trope over the course of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''. Entire episodes would revolve around her being forced to make tough calls about whether or not to compromise the Federation's ideals in order to help get Voyager home. She's much more isolated than the other captains, who can apply to (or have to ''answer'' to) Starfleet, but cut off in the Delta Quadrant she's more like the captain of an old wooden ship far from home port.
* ''Franchise/StargateVerse'':
** General George Hammond of ''Series/StargateSG1'' has it tough as head of Stargate Command. He has to juggle the conflicting issues of his SG teams and their safety, the Air Force, the president, other politicians, and of course, the safety of the galaxy as a whole. The point is driven home when Jack O'Neill is promoted and takes over for Hammond and almost quits because "he can't fill Hammond's shoes".
** Same thing with Dr. Weir, Colonel Carter, and Mr. Woolsey during their respective times as the leader of Atlantis in ''Series/StargateAtlantis''. While the IOA likes to interfere and chew them out for not following protocol, they always refuse to make decisions, instead leaving the leader to make the tough calls and then deal with being chewed out for making said tough decisions (vicious cycle, no?)
** Later in ''Series/StargateUniverse'', Jack O'Neill chews out Colonel Young for hesitating and making the wrong (no) call, pointing out that literally moments ago Colonel Carter left two people to die so her ship and crew would be saved.
* Series/{{Buffy|TheVampireSlayer}} often felt this way about her calling as the Slayer making her feel different. It bordered on what could be considered supreme egotism sometimes and when faced with one very tough decision [[spoiler:about whether to kill Anya for restarting her vengeance demon ways]] she claimed that the Scooby Gang was not a democracy, that she's the Slayer and eventually all the tough decisions come down to her.
* ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'':
** Commander (later Admiral) William Adama. Seeing as how the military affairs of all that's left of mankind are in his hands, dropping the ball even once means humanity's last chance is gone.
** In the miniseries, at one point the Galactica is hit by a nuke. The damaged section's fires are endangering the ship and the automatic fire suppressors are out. Nearly a hundred of Tyrol's people are fighting the fires with handheld gear... when Tigh orders the section to be sealed off and the atmosphere to be vented, putting out the fires and [[ThrownOutTheAirlock killing everyone inside]]. Understandably, Tyrol tries to protest but not only Tigh is his superior officer, they don't really have a choice because [[ColdEquation if they wait until everyone gets out, the fire will reach the fuel lines and blow the whole ship to smithereens]]. Afterwards, Tyrol tries to appeal to Adama and almost breaks down in tears right then and there, had it not for Adama's GetAHoldOfYourselfMan DeathGlare.
--->Forty seconds, sir... All I've needed... was forty seconds...
* {{Invoked|Trope}} in one episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'', where a man who has discovered a genie in a lamp imagines how each of several potential wishes would play out for him. In one ImagineSpot, he is the President of the United States, only to find himself confronted with a crisis where he must make a critical decision without concrete facts to suggest the correct answer, and knowing that the consequences of making the wrong decision could be catastrophic. This scenario leads him to decide against making this his wish.
* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'':
** In one of the more humanizing moments for Dr. Kelso, he puts Dr. Cox in charge of trying to figure out how to balance the budget without firing someone. Much to Cox's chagrin, he can't, and Kelso points out that he doesn't (always) make his decisions because he's a {{jerkass}}; sometimes, it's the only way to keep Sacred Heart running.
** Another great Kelso example is the end of an episode where J.D. shadows him all day trying to find something nice to say about him (but fails). Specifically on that day, Kelso put a rich patient ahead of a poor one for an experimental medical treatment that was his only hope (because the rich guy will now donate tons of cash to the hospital, allowing them to continue offering medical care to homeless and uninsured pregnant women). Kelso acts like it was an easy call that doesn't bother him, but the episode ends with him letting his guard down with nobody around. He looks incredibly shaken and forlorn as he walks to his car.
** After Kelso's retirement, Dr. Cox is made the new Chief Of Medicine, and quickly finds just how brutal the trappings of the job really are, and it quickly costs him both any time for actually practicing medicine, and time with his family.
* ''Series/{{Dollhouse}}'''s Adelle Dewitt feels this trope pretty hard, though most characters are unaware of how much it weighs on her, thanks to her [[TheWomanWearingTheQueenlyMask Queenly Mask]].
* Not that modern monarchs do much actual "commanding," but the young King Richard in ''Series/ThePalace'' struggled to reconcile his role as monarch with his political views, love life, and so on.
* Subverted in ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'s Christmas Carol'' when Ebenezar Blackadder sees if he becomes bad his descendants will rule the Universe, the Ghost of Christmas Present's reaction is 'Maybe... Maybe... But would you be happy? Being ruler of the universe is not all it's cracked up to be - there's the long hours... I mean, you wave at people the whole time. You're no longer your own boss.' It doesn't work.

to:

* Long story short, pretty much every captain from ''Franchise/StarTrek'' feels this at ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
** Robb starts to feel them when his father's departure and his mother's breakdown leave him in charge in "The Kingsroad". By "Baelor", he's led an army to war and and sacrificed two thousand men for victory. Things only get worse as the war drags on and
some point. This includes all the spin-offs, and even one shot captains often wind up feeling the burden of command before their spot is over. Readers of the ''Literature/HoratioHornblower'' books can pick out scenes that mirror ones from the novels, which were a direct inspiration for the series.
** Really, this has been in Trek ever since the ''very first pilot'' of ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'', where [[ThePeteBest Captain Christopher Pike]] discusses the possibility of resigning, tired of being responsible for the lives and deaths
of his crew.
men start to lose faith despite his victories. In Season 3, his leadership decisions start to put him at odds with some of his more prominent men.
** One episode of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' features Troi taking the bridge officer's test, which she keeps failing until she Daenerys starts to feel them in Season 2, when her people become dependent on her. They only get heavier as her responsibilities increase. She realizes that the win condition is saving the ship by sending a virtual crewman to certain death. This in turn ties into an earlier episode where, due to an accident, Troi is stuck as the senior most officer on the bridge but her rank was conferred based on her counselor position, not her technical or command experience. So she has to rely on the junior officers to explain the situation to her and make a gut call which, based on the above latter episode, she made wrong. It's only by luck that her decision didn't get anyone killed, something that she acknowledges which is what leads her to seek that bridge officer qualification later on.
** Starting with TNG, the captain often isn't permitted to enter dangerous situations as Kirk frequently did; the first officer goes in their place, because the captain is the single most indispensable person on the ship.
** Sisko lives and breathes this trope from day one of ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine''. He has to deal with the volatile and extreme politics of Bajor, the machinations of the Cardassians, the [[spoiler:Dominion War]], his role as Emissary of the Prophets, an (initially) uncooperative first officer, and the difficulties of single fatherhood on top of his regular duties as the commanding officer of one of the busiest and most strategically important space stations.
** Janeway started to embody this trope over the course of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''. Entire episodes would revolve around her
being forced to make tough calls about whether or a ruler and being a conqueror are not to compromise the Federation's ideals in order to help get Voyager home. She's much more isolated than the other captains, who can apply to (or same things. As Tyrion notes, being a ruler means that they have to ''answer'' to) Starfleet, but cut off in the Delta Quadrant she's more like the captain of an old wooden ship far from home port.
* ''Franchise/StargateVerse'':
** General George Hammond of ''Series/StargateSG1'' has it tough as head of Stargate Command. He has to juggle the conflicting issues of his SG teams
be "terrible" and their safety, the Air Force, the president, other politicians, and of course, the safety of the galaxy as a whole. The point he is driven home when Jack O'Neill is promoted and takes over for Hammond and almost quits because "he can't fill Hammond's shoes".
** Same thing with Dr. Weir, Colonel Carter, and Mr. Woolsey during their respective times as the leader of Atlantis in ''Series/StargateAtlantis''. While the IOA likes to interfere and chew them out for not following protocol, they always refuse to make decisions, instead leaving the leader to make the tough calls and then deal with being chewed out for making said tough decisions (vicious cycle, no?)
** Later in ''Series/StargateUniverse'', Jack O'Neill chews out Colonel Young for hesitating and making the wrong (no) call, pointing out
pleased that literally moments ago Colonel Carter left two Daenerys is "the right kind of terrible", that is the kind "that prevents her people to die so her ship and crew would be saved.
* Series/{{Buffy|TheVampireSlayer}} often felt this way about her calling as the Slayer making her feel different. It bordered on what could be considered supreme egotism sometimes and when faced with one very tough decision [[spoiler:about whether to kill Anya for restarting her vengeance demon ways]] she claimed that the Scooby Gang was not a democracy, that she's the Slayer and eventually all the tough decisions come down to her.
* ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003'':
** Commander (later Admiral) William Adama. Seeing as how the military affairs of all that's left of mankind are in his hands, dropping the ball
from being even once means humanity's last chance is gone.
** In the miniseries, at one point the Galactica is hit by a nuke. The damaged section's fires are endangering the ship and the automatic fire suppressors are out. Nearly a hundred of Tyrol's people are fighting the fires with handheld gear... when Tigh orders the section to be sealed off and the atmosphere to be vented, putting out the fires and [[ThrownOutTheAirlock killing everyone inside]]. Understandably, Tyrol tries to protest but not only Tigh is his superior officer, they don't really have a choice because [[ColdEquation if they wait until everyone gets out, the fire will reach the fuel lines and blow the whole ship to smithereens]]. Afterwards, Tyrol tries to appeal to Adama and almost breaks down in tears right then and there, had it not for Adama's GetAHoldOfYourselfMan DeathGlare.
--->Forty seconds, sir... All I've needed... was forty seconds...
* {{Invoked|Trope}} in one episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'', where a man who has discovered a genie in a lamp imagines how each of several potential wishes would play out for him. In one ImagineSpot, he is the President of the United States, only to find himself confronted with a crisis where he must make a critical decision without concrete facts to suggest the correct answer, and knowing that the consequences of making the wrong decision could be catastrophic. This scenario leads him to decide against making this his wish.
* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'':
** In one of the
more humanizing moments for Dr. Kelso, he puts Dr. Cox in charge of trying to figure out how to balance the budget without firing someone. Much to Cox's chagrin, he can't, and Kelso points out that he so." Dany doesn't (always) make his decisions because he's a {{jerkass}}; sometimes, it's the only way to keep Sacred Heart running.
** Another great Kelso example is the end of an episode where J.D. shadows him all day trying to find something nice to say about him (but fails). Specifically on that day, Kelso put a rich patient ahead of a poor one for an experimental medical treatment that was his only hope (because the rich guy will now donate tons of cash
like making compromises and concessions to the hospital, allowing them nobility of Slaver's Bay but she does so anyway, to continue offering medical care to homeless build some kind of peace in Meereen and uninsured pregnant women). Kelso acts like it was an easy call that moderate multiple factions, and on returning to Westeros, she doesn't bother him, but the episode ends like dealing with him letting the picky norms of Westerosi feudalism, namely their endless grudges, feuds and prejudices against Dothraki but decides to proceed slowly if only to prove IAmNotMyFather.
** Alliser Thorne tells Jon that a commander will always face criticism for
his guard down decisions, but if he ever begins second-guessing himself he will become indecisive, an even worse trait than being wrong.
** Jon sends his friend Grenn and five others to hold the crucial inner gate even though he knows it is likely a SuicideMission.
** Slightly touched upon
with Tywin. He has Seven Kingdoms to run during an open rebellion and the ship of fools and schemers that he governs does not make it any easier. When Tyrion casually asks him if he's enjoying the position, Tywin finds the query outlandish and repeats back the question in disbelief. In the books, Kevan speaks earnestly about how Tywin is a stern but just man of duty doing a tough job for decades with little appreciation or reward.
** Cersei has moments of fragility and self-pity where she laments the hardships of the regency that have fallen on her. Given her pettiness and dismal management,
nobody around. He looks incredibly shaken and forlorn as he walks to his car.
** After Kelso's retirement, Dr. Cox is made the new Chief Of Medicine, and quickly finds just how brutal the trappings of the job
really are, and it quickly costs him both any time for empathizes with her.
* Done in the ''Series/HoratioHornblower'' telefilms, of course, although since the viewer isn't
actually practicing medicine, and time with his family.
* ''Series/{{Dollhouse}}'''s Adelle Dewitt feels this trope pretty hard, though most characters are unaware of how much it weighs on her, thanks to her [[TheWomanWearingTheQueenlyMask Queenly Mask]].
* Not that modern monarchs do much actual "commanding," but the young King Richard in ''Series/ThePalace'' struggled to reconcile his role as monarch with his political views, love life, and so on.
* Subverted in ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'s Christmas Carol'' when Ebenezar Blackadder sees if he becomes bad his descendants will rule the Universe, the Ghost of Christmas Present's reaction is 'Maybe... Maybe... But would you be happy? Being ruler of the universe is not all
inside Hornblower's thoughts it's cracked up less pronounced. "The Examination for Lieutenant / The Fire Ships" in particular revolves around this theme. While Hornblower studies out of a book to be - there's examined by a board, his readiness for actual command is repeatedly tested as he witnesses and experiences what happens when captains make reckless decisions, when circumstances outside one's control imperil the long hours... I mean, you wave lives of subordinates, and times where he can't do ''anything'' to make a man follow his lead. Hornblower ends up questioning if he's fit for promotion at people all, but [[TheMentor Captain Pellew]] says he's doing fine and living with such things is the whole time. You're no longer your own boss.' It doesn't work.price of being a leader.



* Aaron "Hotch" Hotchner of ''Series/CriminalMinds'' can be seen often second guessing his own decisions. The best example is in the second part of "The Fisher King", where, after scolding Agent Anderson for not staying with Elle after driving her home [[spoiler:causing her to get shot]], Hotch laments how he forget to tell Anderson to specifically stay with her after driving her home.

to:

* Aaron "Hotch" Hotchner ''Franchise/KamenRider'':
** ''Series/KamenRiderBuild'': Sento Kiriyu was [[GoodFeelsGood happy]] for as long as his duty
of ''Series/CriminalMinds'' can Kamen Rider involved fighting [[NebulousEvilOrganization Faust]] and protecting people of Touto from Smash. Things were fair and simple. The responsibilty of creating the outcome of civil war between Touto and Hokuto that technically started because of him and making decision about people's lives nearly crushed him.
** ''Series/KamenRiderDragonKnight'': With all other Ventaran Riders gone, Len finds himself in charge of the earth resistance against Xaviax's invansion. He is fighting in stealthy war where half the soldiers don't even know who they are fighting and has to give them a FateWorseThanDeath or let them aid Xaviax in his conquest of another world. This sparks his duty vs. morals conflict.
** ''Series/KamenRiderExAid'': Kyotaro Hinata, Ministry Of Health had to deal with several epidemies of illness that causes people [[EverythingFades to disappear]] if left untreated, all with his authority, political power and DysfunctionJunction crew of specialists. Naturally, putting faith in them and convincing the public they know what they are doing put a serious strain on him.
* In ''Series/TheLastShip'', poor Jeff Michener was a horribly depressed government functionary mourning the death of his entire family when he discovered that he also happened to
be seen often second guessing the de facto President of the United States. He was so unprepared to take command that it came as a relief to him when the Chosen cult found him and decided to make him their puppet. After the crew of the ''Nathan James'' rescues him, he tries to kill himself, and he feels so lost that he nearly has an anxiety attack while trying to decide what to have for lunch.
* Jack from ''Series/{{Lost}}'' is a very reluctant [[TheLeader leader]].
* This trope is discussed in the ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' episode where the special-ed class runs away, and Hal leads [[DumbMuscle a group of body builders that decided to follow him around.]] After Dewey asks Hal a question about leadership (Dewey had been hiding the special-ed students who were living in the neighborhood's treetops, who had [[{{Blackmail}} blackmailed]] Dewey into keeping their location secret, but was now thinking of telling on them), Hal responds by saying that people think that being a leader means having people looking up to you and doing what you want, but really being a leader means sometimes making hard decisions and telling the truth to the people that look to you for guidance, which will likely leave them disappointed.
* One episode of ''Series/{{MASH}}'' saw the main characters follow the British tradition of Boxing Day by having the enlisted and officers switch roles for the day. Of particular note are Colonel Potter's and Klinger's switched roles. Colonel Potter gains new respect for Klinger when he finds out just how much work is involved in being company clerk and Klinger gains new respect for the Colonel when he learns just how much weight the burden of command carries and having to be responsible for making extremely tough decisions.
* In ''Series/MediciMastersOfFlorence'': Cosimo, the son who wanted to be an artist, is picked to lead the family bank (one of the largest in Europe, with a great deal of political power) because of his ingenuity and ruthlessness at need. He most explicitly ''does not'' want this, and years later is baffled by
his own decisions. The best example is son's eagerness to get involved in the second part family business and ''signoria'' politics. More, he visibly struggles with his guilt over all the things he does in his family's interests, spending much time praying for forgiveness.
* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'' has the episode "Trial By Fire", in which the President
of "The Fisher King", where, the US is sequestered after scolding Agent Anderson for not staying a UFO is spotted coming towards the earth at light speed. It's up to him as to how the US will respond to the potential threat, though his [[AttackAttackAttack warhawk]] and [[SuicidalPacifism dovish]] advisers have plenty to say on the matter.
* Not that modern monarchs do much actual "commanding," but the young King Richard in ''Series/ThePalace'' struggled to reconcile his role as monarch
with Elle after driving her home [[spoiler:causing her to get shot]], Hotch laments how he forget to tell Anderson to specifically stay with her after driving her home.his political views, love life, and so on.



* Israeli satire show ''Eretz Nehederet'' aired [[http://totzeret-haaretz.tumblr.com/post/42509645050/this-song-isnt-relevant-anymore-but-i-got-a this skit]] before the winner of the 2009 elections was declared. It featured a group of former Israeli prime ministers singing a song to both candidates, aimed at the winner-to-be, detailing how awful life would be after they get the job. Subverted by Shim'on Peres, who would still like to be the prime minister again in spite of everything.
* ''Series/{{Borgen}}'' practically runs on this. It's revealed that WhenYouComingHomeDad is in full effect in Borgen, and many politicians divorce or have their marriage ruined because of this. [[spoiler:By the end of season 1, this happens to Birgitte too.]]

to:

* Israeli satire show ''Eretz Nehederet'' aired [[http://totzeret-haaretz.tumblr.com/post/42509645050/this-song-isnt-relevant-anymore-but-i-got-a this skit]] before the winner ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'':
** In one
of the 2009 elections more humanizing moments for Dr. Kelso, he puts Dr. Cox in charge of trying to figure out how to balance the budget without firing someone. Much to Cox's chagrin, he can't, and Kelso points out that he doesn't (always) make his decisions because he's a {{jerkass}}; sometimes, it's the only way to keep Sacred Heart running.
** Another great Kelso example is the end of an episode where J.D. shadows him all day trying to find something nice to say about him (but fails). Specifically on that day, Kelso put a rich patient ahead of a poor one for an experimental medical treatment that
was declared. It featured a group his only hope (because the rich guy will now donate tons of former Israeli prime ministers singing a song cash to the hospital, allowing them to continue offering medical care to homeless and uninsured pregnant women). Kelso acts like it was an easy call that doesn't bother him, but the episode ends with him letting his guard down with nobody around. He looks incredibly shaken and forlorn as he walks to his car.
** After Kelso's retirement, Dr. Cox is made the new Chief Of Medicine, and quickly finds just how brutal the trappings of the job really are, and it quickly costs him
both candidates, aimed at any time for actually practicing medicine, and time with his family.
* One of
the winner-to-be, detailing how awful life would be after they get main motifs in ''Series/TheSopranos'':
** Tony Soprano is very savvy about this issue and is unable to decide which he feels more strongly:
the job. Subverted by Shim'on Peres, who would still stress or the benefits of being mob boss.
--->'''Tony:''' All due respect, you got no fuckin' idea what it's
like to be the prime minister again in spite Number One. Every decision you make affects every facet of everything.
* ''Series/{{Borgen}}'' practically runs on this.
every other fuckin' thing. It's revealed that WhenYouComingHomeDad too much to deal with almost. And in the end you're completely alone with it all.
** Tony also tries to warn DragonAscendant Johnny Sack about the difficulty of the position once he succeeds in becoming boss of his crew. Johnny falls victims to the chains not long after.
** Silvio has to take the reins for a brief period after Tony
is in full effect in Borgen, and many politicians divorce or have their marriage ruined hospitalized with a gunshot. He doesn't last more than a few days because of this. [[spoiler:By the end stresses of season 1, the job quickly take a toll on his health.
* ''Series/SpaceAboveAndBeyond'': This trope was used several times by the main characters.
* ''Franchise/StargateVerse'':
** General George Hammond of ''Series/StargateSG1'' has it tough as head of Stargate Command. He has to juggle the conflicting issues of his SG teams and their safety, the Air Force, the president, other politicians, and of course, the safety of the galaxy as a whole. The point is driven home when Jack O'Neill is promoted and takes over for Hammond and almost quits because "he can't fill Hammond's shoes".
** Same thing with Dr. Weir, Colonel Carter, and Mr. Woolsey during their respective times as the leader of Atlantis in ''Series/StargateAtlantis''. While the IOA likes to interfere and chew them out for not following protocol, they always refuse to make decisions, instead leaving the leader to make the tough calls and then deal with being chewed out for making said tough decisions (vicious cycle, no?)
** Later in ''Series/StargateUniverse'', Jack O'Neill chews out Colonel Young for hesitating and making the wrong (no) call, pointing out that literally moments ago Colonel Carter left two people to die so her ship and crew would be saved.
* Long story short, pretty much every captain from ''Franchise/StarTrek'' feels
this happens at some point. This includes all the spin-offs, and even one shot captains often wind up feeling the burden of command before their spot is over. Readers of the ''Literature/HoratioHornblower'' books can pick out scenes that mirror ones from the novels, which were a direct inspiration for the series.
** Really, this has been in Trek ever since the ''very first pilot'' of ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'', where [[ThePeteBest Captain Christopher Pike]] discusses the possibility of resigning, tired of being responsible for the lives and deaths of his crew.
** One episode of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' features Troi taking the bridge officer's test, which she keeps failing until she realizes that the win condition is saving the ship by sending a virtual crewman
to Birgitte too.]]certain death. This in turn ties into an earlier episode where, due to an accident, Troi is stuck as the senior most officer on the bridge but her rank was conferred based on her counselor position, not her technical or command experience. So she has to rely on the junior officers to explain the situation to her and make a gut call which, based on the above latter episode, she made wrong. It's only by luck that her decision didn't get anyone killed, something that she acknowledges which is what leads her to seek that bridge officer qualification later on.
** Starting with TNG, the captain often isn't permitted to enter dangerous situations as Kirk frequently did; the first officer goes in their place, because the captain is the single most indispensable person on the ship.
** Sisko lives and breathes this trope from day one of ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine''. He has to deal with the volatile and extreme politics of Bajor, the machinations of the Cardassians, the [[spoiler:Dominion War]], his role as Emissary of the Prophets, an (initially) uncooperative first officer, and the difficulties of single fatherhood on top of his regular duties as the commanding officer of one of the busiest and most strategically important space stations.
** Janeway started to embody this trope over the course of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''. Entire episodes would revolve around her being forced to make tough calls about whether or not to compromise the Federation's ideals in order to help get Voyager home. She's much more isolated than the other captains, who can apply to (or have to ''answer'' to) Starfleet, but cut off in the Delta Quadrant she's more like the captain of an old wooden ship far from home port.
* {{Invoked|Trope}} in one episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'', where a man who has discovered a genie in a lamp imagines how each of several potential wishes would play out for him. In one ImagineSpot, he is the President of the United States, only to find himself confronted with a crisis where he must make a critical decision without concrete facts to suggest the correct answer, and knowing that the consequences of making the wrong decision could be catastrophic. This scenario leads him to decide against making this his wish.
* The titular queen on ''Series/{{Victoria}}'' struggles with her newfound power. Though she genuinely seeks to be a good and fair ruler, she also struggles with the idea that she must be politically impartial, for the most part; even when it comes to people or ideas she feels very strongly about as an individual, she must be seen to be fair as queen.
* ''Series/TheWestWing'''s President Bartlet frequently finds himself feeling the full weight of his authority, especially when what the job calls for goes against his personal beliefs.
* ''Series/{{Wings}}'': after Joe leaves Nantucket in 'Joe Blows' due to being overworked, Brian discovers how difficult it is to operate a business.



* On ''Series/{{The 100}}'', Clarke's [[CharacterDevelopment character]] [[StoryArc arc]] in Season 2 is built around how, by becoming her people's leader, she's forced to commit increasingly ruthless acts to keep them alive. By the season finale, she's come to view herself as NecessarilyEvil, and can no longer bear to be around her friends and family, because seeing them just reminds her of the horrible things she did in their name. She views accepting this guilt as her responsibility, saying, "I bear it so they don't have to."
* One episode of ''Series/{{MASH}}'' saw the main characters follow the British tradition of Boxing Day by having the enlisted and officers switch roles for the day. Of particular note are Colonel Potter's and Klinger's switched roles. Colonel Potter gains new respect for Klinger when he finds out just how much work is involved in being company clerk and Klinger gains new respect for the Colonel when he learns just how much weight the burden of command carries and having to be responsible for making extremely tough decisions.
* In the ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Two Doctors", a Sontaran admits to having made a "tactical error" and gives the excuse that "it's not easy being commander, the loneliness of supreme responsibility."
* In ''Series/TheLastShip'', poor Jeff Michener was a horribly depressed government functionary mourning the death of his entire family when he discovered that he also happened to be the de facto President of the United States. He was so unprepared to take command that it came as a relief to him when the Chosen cult found him and decided to make him their puppet. After the crew of the ''Nathan James'' rescues him, he tries to kill himself, and he feels so lost that he nearly has an anxiety attack while trying to decide what to have for lunch.
* The titular queen on ''Series/{{Victoria}}'' struggles with her newfound power. Though she genuinely seeks to be a good and fair ruler, she also struggles with the idea that she must be politically impartial, for the most part; even when it comes to people or ideas she feels very strongly about as an individual, she must be seen to be fair as queen.
* Done in the ''Series/HoratioHornblower'' telefilms, of course, although since the viewer isn't actually inside Hornblower's thoughts it's less pronounced. "The Examination for Lieutenant / The Fire Ships" in particular revolves around this theme. While Hornblower studies out of a book to be examined by a board, his readiness for actual command is repeatedly tested as he witnesses and experiences what happens when captains make reckless decisions, when circumstances outside one's control imperil the lives of subordinates, and times where he can't do ''anything'' to make a man follow his lead. Hornblower ends up questioning if he's fit for promotion at all, but [[TheMentor Captain Pellew]] says he's doing fine and living with such things is the price of being a leader.
* In ''Series/MediciMastersOfFlorence'': Cosimo, the son who wanted to be an artist, is picked to lead the family bank (one of the largest in Europe, with a great deal of political power) because of his ingenuity and ruthlessness at need. He most explicitly ''does not'' want this, and years later is baffled by his own son's eagerness to get involved in the family business and ''signoria'' politics. More, he visibly struggles with his guilt over all the things he does in his family's interests, spending much time praying for forgiveness.
* This trope is discussed in the ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'' episode where the special-ed class runs away, and Hal leads [[DumbMuscle a group of body builders that decided to follow him around.]] After Dewey asks Hal a question about leadership (Dewey had been hiding the special-ed students who were living in the neighborhood's treetops, who had [[{{Blackmail}} blackmailed]] Dewey into keeping their location secret, but was now thinking of telling on them), Hal responds by saying that people think that being a leader means having people looking up to you and doing what you want, but really being a leader means sometimes making hard decisions and telling the truth to the people that look to you for guidance, which will likely leave them disappointed.
* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'' has the episode "Trial By Fire", in which the President of the US is sequestered after a UFO is spotted coming towards the earth at light speed. It's up to him as to how the US will respond to the potential threat, though his [[AttackAttackAttack warhawk]] and [[SuicidalPacifism dovish]] advisers have plenty to say on the matter.
* ''Series/KamenRiderDragonKnight'': With all other Ventaran Riders gone, Len finds himself in charge of the earth resistance against Xaviax's invansion. He is fighting in stealthy war where half the soldiers don't even know who they are fighting and has to give them a FateWorseThanDeath or let them aid Xaviax in his conquest of another world. This sparks his duty vs. morals conflict.
* ''Series/KamenRiderExAid'': Kyotaro Hinata, Ministry Of Health had to deal with several epidemies of illness that causes people [[EverythingFades to disappear]] if left untreated, all with his authority, political power and DysfunctionJunction crew of specialists. Naturally, putting faith in them and convincing the public they know what they are doing put a serious strain on him.
* ''Series/KamenRiderBuild'': Sento Kiriyu was [[GoodFeelsGood happy]] for as long as his duty of Kamen Rider involved fighting [[NebulousEvilOrganization Faust]] and protecting people of Touto from Smash. Things were fair and simple. The responsibilty of creating the outcome of civil war between Touto and Hokuto that technically started because of him and making decision about people's lives nearly crushed him.

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* ''Film/{{Gladiator}}'': Emperor Marcus Aurelius knows all too well how heavy the crown is, having spent a lifetime trying to keep Rome prosperous, and knowing that his son Commodus is an InadequateInheritor to say the least, wants General Maximus Meridus to succeed him instead specifically because Maximus does not want power and would see the throne as the burden it really is, but would accept it anyway. It's a moot point after Commodus murders his father to seize power and quickly proves himself even worse than Aurelius feared.


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* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'': Parodied when Stan wakes up one day and discovers he's somehow gotten the physique of a 70-year old overnight despite being in excellent health the day before (He had been cursed with RapidAging by an old man he made fun of at the mall). After he goes to the hospital, one of the questions for possible causes the doctor asks is "are you President of the United States?"

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* ''ComicBook/100Bullets'': The Trust has shades of this, given how it's members end up inheriting secret control of the country and live in fear of assassination for the rest of their lives. Mia Simone in particular is implied to feel this way at [[spoiler: Axel Nagel's]] wake, questioning whether the Trust leaders control their houses, or their houses control them.


-->'''Surge''': Shut up. Just '''shut up!'''\\

to:

-->'''Surge''': --->'''Surge''': Shut up. Just '''shut up!'''\\


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* [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Lucina]] from ''Fanfic/GoldenThreadsTieUs'', can't ever allow herself to rest or look weak. She's constantly pushing herself in the belief that everyone will fall apart if their warrior princess doesn't measure up to the task.
-->'''Severa:''' Your duty is staying there to rest. You're not going to exactly be helpful in that condition.\\
'''Lucina:''' I'm fine. Maybe not for battle, no. But there are chores, night watches, somewhere I could make myself useful.\\
'''Severa:''' No, no, no. You don't have to be on all hours of the day, are you crazy? No one can take that.\\
'''Lucina:''' You said my strength is what made me worth following. What type of leader am I, to hide myself away nursing my wounds?\\
'''Severa:''' Oh, you've got to be joking. You're being unreasonable. We're not going to lose faith in you because you get wounded like a normal human being and not some Risen.\\
'''Lucina:''' Of course not. But, I have to know that I'm worthy of your expectations of me.\\
'''Severa:''' Are you saying that you're trying to prove to yourself that you're good enough for us? You?\\
'''Lucina:''' There's Risen dangerously close to Ylisstol. This is as good as time to any to assert myself as worthy of my Father's legacy.\\
'''Severa:''' I said, you're being crazy! All of us are here too! We don't need you to do everything for us, nor do we expect you to!\\
'''Lucina:''' That's exactly it, though. I'm doing this for you. You, and Cynthia, and all of our allies! This weight on my shoulders is...a burden I must bear, but I will do so without complaint, if it's for your sakes.


* {{Invoked|Trope}} in one episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'', where a man who has discovered a genie in a lamp considers several potential wishes as he tries to determine what he will ultimately wish for. In one ImagineSpot, he is the President of the United States, only to find himself confronted with a crisis where he must make a critical decision without concrete facts to suggest the correct answer, and knowing that the consequences of making the wrong decision could be catastrophic. This scenario leads him to decide against making this his wish.

to:

* {{Invoked|Trope}} in one episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'', where a man who has discovered a genie in a lamp considers imagines how each of several potential wishes as he tries to determine what he will ultimately wish for.would play out for him. In one ImagineSpot, he is the President of the United States, only to find himself confronted with a crisis where he must make a critical decision without concrete facts to suggest the correct answer, and knowing that the consequences of making the wrong decision could be catastrophic. This scenario leads him to decide against making this his wish.

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* {{Invoked|Trope}} in one episode of ''Series/TheTwilightZone1959'', where a man who has discovered a genie in a lamp considers several potential wishes as he tries to determine what he will ultimately wish for. In one ImagineSpot, he is the President of the United States, only to find himself confronted with a crisis where he must make a critical decision without concrete facts to suggest the correct answer, and knowing that the consequences of making the wrong decision could be catastrophic. This scenario leads him to decide against making this his wish.


** UsefulNotes/WarrenHarding is recorded to have said ''I am not fit for this office and I should never have been here''. He also stated ''I have no trouble with my enemies - I can take care of my enemies all right. But my damn friends... They're the ones that keep me walking the floors at night!''

to:

** UsefulNotes/WarrenHarding is recorded to have said ''I am not fit for this office and I should never have been here''. He also stated ''I have no trouble with my enemies - I can take care of my enemies all right. But my damn friends... [[WithFriendsLikeThese They're the ones that keep me walking the floors at night!''night]]!''

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* Garnet brings this up in the episode "[[Recap/StevenUniverseS5E15PoolHopping Pool Hopping]]" of ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse''. She can [[{{Seer}} predict]] possible futures, which allows her to be an effective leader for the Crystal Gems. However, a string of completely unexpected events has left her in doubt of her abilities and her position as their leader. Her teammates are looking to her for answers more than ever, and it upsets her immensely that she doesn't know what to do anymore. At the end of the episode, she comes to the conclusion that it's up to her now to decide what she ''wants'' the future to be, so that she can confidently lead her team again.

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* ''VideoGame/EnsembleStars'': That Eichi struggles with this is the primary takeaway from ''Circus'' - he genuinely believes that he is the only one who can ensure Yumenosaki Academy's success, being the Student Council President and the son of its main donor (meaning that the school board obeys his every whim), but while he is willing to play the part of the emperor, he feels the immense pressure of everyone's futures on his shoulders. To a lesser extent, most of the unit leaders struggle with having such responsibility over the others under their care - Chiaki, for example, is convinced that he's not as good a leader as his predecessor Madara and so is constantly working himself too hard in an attempt to live up to him.


** A President who aged ''before'' taking office was arguably [[UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower Ike]], due to serving as [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Allied Commander of the European theater]]. The stress of leading allied forces against a well-trained military force drove Ike to drink and smoke constantly. And he took the duty seriously: A letter was found after D-Day that Eisenhower wrote in case the Normandy landings failed where he asked [[ItsAllMyFault to take full blame]] (even though the landing was successful, the letter is [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments still considered an excellent example of leadership]]). By the time Ike was President, he wasn't in the best of health.

to:

** A President who aged ''before'' taking office was arguably [[UsefulNotes/DwightDEisenhower Ike]], due to serving as [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Allied Commander of the European theater]]. The stress of leading allied forces against a well-trained military force drove Ike to drink and smoke constantly. And he took the duty seriously: A letter was found after D-Day that Eisenhower wrote in case the Normandy landings failed where he asked [[ItsAllMyFault to take full blame]] (even though the landing was successful, the letter is [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments still considered an excellent example of leadership]]).leadership). By the time Ike was President, he wasn't in the best of health.

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*** Since premature aging is often one of the main signs of this stress, his age at the onset might have also played a role, making the stress less visible than it might be on a younger man.

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