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* The ''VideoGame/VirtualVillagers'' series of casual games is very prone to this trope. The player has to pick up a sprite and drop it on a hotspot to get a particular reaction, such as starting a villager working on a task. This is even harder than clicking on the hotspot, since when clicking, the cursor gives a more accurate indication of screen position. The hotspots in the ports to IOSGames and AndroidGames are possibly even more difficult to find than in games played on desktop or laptop computers because of the smaller touch screens.

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* The ''VideoGame/VirtualVillagers'' series of casual games is very prone to this trope. The player has to pick up a sprite and drop it on a hotspot to get a particular reaction, such as starting a villager working on a task. This is even harder than clicking on the hotspot, since when clicking, the cursor gives a more accurate indication of screen position. The hotspots in the ports to IOSGames UsefulNotes/IOSGames and AndroidGames are possibly even more difficult to find than in games played on desktop or laptop computers because of the smaller touch screens.


* ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM'' has several forced first person segments, where you're trying to find one small detail in a much larger picture. The most infamous of these involve [[spoiler:a spot of green blood on a field of green grass.]] The player not only isn't given any hints about this, but they also receive a RedHerring in the form of the game [[spoiler: making you face in the ''complete opposite direction'', where there is a corpse that all the NPCs are surrounding and commenting on the condition of. You're expected not to go with the natural assumption that you need to find a way to examine it, and instead turn 180 degrees to look at a barely noticeable puddle.]]

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* ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM'' has several forced first person segments, where you're trying to find one small detail in a much larger picture. The most infamous of these involve [[spoiler:a spot of green blood on a field of green grass.]] The player not only isn't given any hints about this, but they also receive a RedHerring in the form of the game [[spoiler: making you face in the ''complete opposite direction'', where there is a corpse that all the NPCs [=NPCs=] are surrounding and commenting on the condition of. You're expected not to go with the natural assumption that you need to find a way to examine it, and instead turn 180 degrees to look at a barely noticeable puddle.]]


* Speaking of LucasArts games, the ''goddamn miniature golf mini-game'' in SamAndMaxHitTheRoad.

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* Speaking of LucasArts games, the ''goddamn miniature golf mini-game'' in SamAndMaxHitTheRoad.VideoGame/SamAndMaxHitTheRoad.
** Until you eventually GuideDangIt and find out that you're not supposed to be hitting the target at all. [[MoonLogicPuzzle You're supposed to be hitting the gators]]. And you're not supposed to be hitting them with golf balls, but [[InsaneTrollLogic with fish, because both the golf balls and the fish come in buckets]].

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* Speaking of LucasArts games, the ''goddamn miniature golf mini-game'' in SamAndMaxHitTheRoad.


* The ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' series has some fun with this trope. But like all latter-day Creator/LucasArts games, it displays item names when you hover the mouse on them.
** In the first game, you're required to get a rubber chicken to go somewhere. The problem? It blends in with "cursed" chickens the player character says something to the effect of "I'm not going near those" if clicked on the wrong one. Thankfully, this was fixed in the special edition.
** In the second game you are, at one point, completely in the dark. It turns out there's a light switch on the wall. The problem is, both the room and the switch are ''completely'' black, and thus invisible.
** In the hard version of the second game (and the only version of the special edition) you at one point have to pick up a piece of string that blends in perfectly with the mise-en-scene.
** In the third game, if you carefully move your cursor over every pixel in the Plunder Island beach area, you can locate a "secret button" hidden inside a column on a bridge. Pushing this button remotely activates the nearby fort's cannons, which is [[EasterEgg absolutely useless]] but, according to Threepwood, "fun".
** Also in the third game, repeatedly using the beach water on Blood Island will make Guybrush get in, and appear in the water scene from the first game. You only get a brief look before Guybrush comes out again. Afterwards, you can click on a certain spot in the water to go under and have a proper look. There's only about a 3 pixel square to click on.
** There's a lucky penny hidden on Lucre Island in the fourth game. You have to run to an area of the city that you've got no business being in and carefully walk around until Guybrush is standing right next to it, facing in exactly the right direction. [[spoiler:It's been glued to the ground.]]
* ''VideoGame/{{Myst}}'' is in many ways a game of pixel hunting--case in point, finding the secret room in the Stoneship Age. This is actually an accidental case of this trope: the secret room in Stoneship is clearly marked in the Mac version. Due to palette changes when porting the game to the PC, the mark became invisible and finding the secret room is much harder. The problem of clues hidden in dark shadows is also why the games have a gamma calibration built in to run at first startup.
** ''VideoGame/{{Riven}}: The Sequel to Myst'' also has its points of pixel hunting, with switches hidden in tiny decorative buttons on lamp posts looking exactly like ''every other lamp post'' you encounter on your way there. Good luck hovering over the whole screen in the hopes of seeing the cursor change.


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* The ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' series has some fun with this trope. But like all latter-day Creator/LucasArts games, it displays item names when you hover the mouse on them.
** In the first game, you're required to get a rubber chicken to go somewhere. The problem? It blends in with "cursed" chickens the player character says something to the effect of "I'm not going near those" if clicked on the wrong one. Thankfully, this was fixed in the special edition.
** In the second game you are, at one point, completely in the dark. It turns out there's a light switch on the wall. The problem is, both the room and the switch are ''completely'' black, and thus invisible.
** In the hard version of the second game (and the only version of the special edition) you at one point have to pick up a piece of string that blends in perfectly with the mise-en-scene.
** In the third game, if you carefully move your cursor over every pixel in the Plunder Island beach area, you can locate a "secret button" hidden inside a column on a bridge. Pushing this button remotely activates the nearby fort's cannons, which is [[EasterEgg absolutely useless]] but, according to Threepwood, "fun".
** Also in the third game, repeatedly using the beach water on Blood Island will make Guybrush get in, and appear in the water scene from the first game. You only get a brief look before Guybrush comes out again. Afterwards, you can click on a certain spot in the water to go under and have a proper look. There's only about a 3 pixel square to click on.
** There's a lucky penny hidden on Lucre Island in the fourth game. You have to run to an area of the city that you've got no business being in and carefully walk around until Guybrush is standing right next to it, facing in exactly the right direction. [[spoiler:It's been glued to the ground.]]
* ''VideoGame/{{Myst}}'' is in many ways a game of pixel hunting--case in point, finding the secret room in the Stoneship Age. This is actually an accidental case of this trope: the secret room in Stoneship is clearly marked in the Mac version. Due to palette changes when porting the game to the PC, the mark became invisible and finding the secret room is much harder. The problem of clues hidden in dark shadows is also why the games have a gamma calibration built in to run at first startup.
** ''VideoGame/{{Riven}}: The Sequel to Myst'' also has its points of pixel hunting, with switches hidden in tiny decorative buttons on lamp posts looking exactly like ''every other lamp post'' you encounter on your way there. Good luck hovering over the whole screen in the hopes of seeing the cursor change.
* ''{{The Dig}}'' is plagued with these. One puzzle in particular requires picking up FOUR objects that are indistinguishable from the background art (a ribcage, a dowel, a metal rod, and some kind of heavy hooked polearm), and there are several entire areas that you won't even realize exist, much less be able to visit, unless you accidentally mouse over the right spot in the background.


* In ''VideoGame/ManiacMansion'', if your character is captured, the cell door can be opened by pushing a particular brick - one in a wall of hundreds. This one's pretty easy though, considering the (primitive) engine makes every hotspot at least 8x8 pixels in size.

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* In ''VideoGame/ManiacMansion'', if ''VideoGame/ManiacMansion'':
** If
your character is captured, the cell door can be opened by pushing a particular brick - one in a wall of hundreds. This one's pretty easy though, considering the (primitive) engine makes every hotspot at least 8x8 pixels in size.size.
** An odd example happens in the NES adaptation, where if you happen to click on a specific unmarked spot on the column next to the security door on the second floor you will find a keypad, and you're not likely to find it unless you know it's there or are just randomly clicking everything. However, no matter what you type the mansion will explode a minute later (data miners have confirmed there is no correct code), so it's actually good it's so hard to find. It seems to be something that was DummiedOut, possibly leftover copy protection from the PC versions or the abandoned Pepsi promotion, and that one random spot accidentally triggers it.


* ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest 6: Roger Wilco in The Spinal Frontier'' lampshades this by having the narrator comment on a certain very small item when you look at it by saying, after identifying the item, "Good eyesight! Now we'll have to do one of those puzzles where you have to find a one-pixel coin or something. But hey, who'd design a mean, unfair puzzle like THAT?"

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* ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest 6: Roger Wilco in The Spinal Frontier'' ''VideoGame/SpaceQuestVIRogerWilcoInTheSpinalFrontier'' lampshades this by having the narrator comment on a certain very small item when you look at it by saying, after identifying the item, "Good eyesight! Now we'll have to do one of those puzzles where you have to find a one-pixel coin or something. But hey, who'd design a mean, unfair puzzle like THAT?"


Greg Costikyan discusses this in his article on game design [[http://www.disinterest.org/resource/MUD-Dev/1997q2/001507.html "I Have No Words and I Must Design"]]:

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Greg Costikyan Creator/GregCostikyan discusses this in his article on game design [[http://www.disinterest.org/resource/MUD-Dev/1997q2/001507.html "I Have No Words and I Must Design"]]:


* The dark setting of ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward'' makes some items in puzzle rooms go unnoticeable or plain invisible, which will drag on the investigation and create much frustration because one of the features of [[VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors its prequel]] yields a yellow outline whenever you click something examinable, and in this installment it's gone. One of the major offenders of this trope in VLR is the binder in GAULEM Bay, which is dark grey in a black area next to a ''blatantly noticeable white'' coat, making it impossible to see if your console screen is obscured by a bright light in whatever place you're playing at. There's also the shelf in the Laboratory, which has ''tons'' of bottles and beakers and only half of them are useful, yet you can't tell which is which until you click in every one of them.

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* The dark setting of ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward'' makes some items in puzzle rooms go unnoticeable or plain invisible, which will drag on the investigation and create much frustration because one of the features of [[VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors its prequel]] predecessor]] yields a yellow outline whenever you click something examinable, and in this installment it's gone. One of the major offenders of this trope in VLR is the binder in GAULEM Bay, which is dark grey in a black area next to a ''blatantly noticeable white'' coat, making it impossible to see if your console screen is obscured by a bright light in whatever place you're playing at. There's also the shelf in the Laboratory, which has ''tons'' of bottles and beakers and only half of them are useful, yet you can't tell which is which until you click in every one of them.


* ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM'' has several forced first person segments, where you're trying to find one small detail in a much larger picture. [[spoiler:The cybernetically enhanced Zebesian, where you have to find the small Galactic Federation logo on its chest. You are given no hints about this, and after finding Lyle's body, you have to turn around and look at a spot of green blood, again without hints]]. Worse yet, you have to spot it on a field of green grass. It's hard enough find the spot without it blending in with its surroundings. Even worse, [[spoiler: it happens while all the soldiers are remarking how notably gruesome his death was while standing in a way that obstructs your view of the body, while the natural response is to find a way to move the soldiers or find some way to examine the single most striking thing in the area... but no, the game wants you to completely turn around and look at an odd puddle.]]

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* ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM'' has several forced first person segments, where you're trying to find one small detail in a much larger picture. [[spoiler:The cybernetically enhanced Zebesian, where you have to find the small Galactic Federation logo on its chest. You are given no hints about this, and after finding Lyle's body, you have to turn around and look at a The most infamous of these involve [[spoiler:a spot of green blood, again without hints]]. Worse yet, you have to spot it blood on a field of green grass. It's hard enough find grass.]] The player not only isn't given any hints about this, but they also receive a RedHerring in the spot without it blending in with its surroundings. Even worse, form of the game [[spoiler: it happens while making you face in the ''complete opposite direction'', where there is a corpse that all the soldiers NPCs are remarking how notably gruesome his death was while standing in a way that obstructs your view of surrounding and commenting on the body, while condition of. You're expected not to go with the natural response is assumption that you need to find a way to move the soldiers or find some way to examine the single most striking thing in the area... but no, the game wants you to completely it, and instead turn around and 180 degrees to look at an odd a barely noticeable puddle.]]


** One of these chests, found 'early' in the game, 'cannot' be collected except that '''one time''' in a game, because you have to ride on a Toad's head to jump to a ledge that even 'Super Mario' cannot reach without adding that Toad's height to his jump height. This is 'long' before you get the item that alerts you to hidden chests, meaning that if you missed it that first time, every time you walk through that hallway the thing goes off, and you can literally jump in every square you can reach and not find the chest. GuideDangIt

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** One of these chests, found 'early' early in the game, 'cannot' cannot be collected except that '''one time''' one time in a game, because you have to ride on a Toad's head to jump to a ledge that even 'Super Mario' Super Mario cannot reach without adding that Toad's height to his jump height. This is 'long' long before you get the item that alerts you to hidden chests, meaning that if you missed it that first time, every time you walk through that hallway the thing goes off, and you can literally jump in every square you can reach and not find the chest. GuideDangIt

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